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  • Innocence

  • A Novel
  • By: Dean Koontz
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 11 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,649
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,261
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,272

He lives in solitude beneath the city, an exile from society, which will destroy him if he is ever seen. She dwells in seclusion, a fugitive from enemies who will do her harm if she is ever found. But the bond between them runs deeper than the tragedies that have scarred their lives. Something more than chance - and nothing less than destiny - has brought them together in a world whose hour of reckoning is fast approaching.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Among Koontz’s Best Slow Interesting Books

  • By Michael on 01-02-14

This One Was a S-T-R-U-G-G-L-E

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-17

It was hard to make it to the end of this book, but looking at the other reviews, I kept thinking, it must pay off in the end...I just have to make it to the end. For me, it did not.

The book is from one person's point of view, going through his life and how he's different. Not sure why he's different but we know that he is and has perceptions that 'normal' people do not. Though most of his adult life is mundane, he happens into a situation that changes his life forever.

This was a very slow and drawn out read. Although we learn almost everything about the main character, he still seemed two dimensional to me. I didn't get a sense of who he was; just his reactions to several scenarios.

The narration was good, given with what he had to work with. This one just did not work for me, which is the first of Koontz books that didn't. I hope it becomes a successful series, but one that will not have my participation.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Born a Crime

  • Stories from a South African Childhood
  • By: Trevor Noah
  • Narrated by: Trevor Noah
  • Length: 8 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 75,352
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 69,919
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 69,589

One of the comedy world's fastest-rising stars tells his wild coming of age story during the twilight of apartheid in South Africa and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed. Noah provides something deeper than traditional memoirists: powerfully funny observations about how farcical political and social systems play out in our lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book and perfect narration

  • By Marilyn Armstrong on 12-15-16

Great! Great! Great Book!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-17

At first I was weary because I don't favor books where the author narrates their own work (autobiographies included), but I shouldn't of hesitated. This book is not only engaging, hilarious and relatable but it also has an introspective quality to it. You get a deeper look into apartheid where you see the cause and effect of such a system and the parallels within America.

I would recommend this book to anyone and everyone. Trevor does an excellent job narrating and he really captures your attention. There are gaps in this book, so I am looking forward to another one in the future. Thanks for sharing your story.

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Before You Leap

  • By: Keith Houghton
  • Narrated by: Scott Merriman
  • Length: 9 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 731
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 665
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 667

Peace of mind is all Greg Cole has wanted since the murder of his twin sister, Scarlett. In his new sun-soaked Florida life, he thought he had found it. But when Scarlett's killer is released early from prison with a cast-iron alibi, Greg realizes that his past is about to explode into his present, with terrifying consequences. To expose the truth he must open up old wounds. Greg knows all about dark secrets, but when a childhood friendship comes to the fore, the police turn their spotlight on him.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Riveting start that fizzled out

  • By C. Vincent on 12-29-16

Interesting Read

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-17

The book was decent. I think the narrator did well, although it was sometimes difficult to distinguish between when the main character was talking out loud vs thoughts in his head. That may have more to do with the writer than the narrator though.

This was a promising premise and I enjoyed the character, Greg Cole until he started making irrational idiotic decisions, with unjustifiable rationalizations.. But i guess that's the point, I think. It kind of got muddled in the last third of the book. There were a few twists and turns in which, you think you have it figured out, but not exactly.

This is my first book by Keith Houghton, I think I will read further works by him (if they are discounted) but nothing about this book captivated me enough to go seek out future works by him.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • And One Last Thing...

  • By: Molly Harper
  • Narrated by: Amanda Ronconi
  • Length: 8 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,652
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,807
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,804

Lacey Terwilliger's shock and humiliation over her husband's philandering prompt her to add some bonus material to Mike's company newsletter: stunning Technicolor descriptions of the special brand of "administrative support" his receptionist gives him. The detailed mass e-mail to Mike's family, friends, and clients blows up in her face, and before one can say "instant urban legend", Lacey has become the pariah of her small Kentucky town and a media punch line....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • For me this was such a HOOT!!!

  • By d.e.matthews on 02-12-11

Cute and Funny Story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-24-17

I wasn't sure what to expect from this book since it's outside my preferred thriller, suspense, procedural and fantasy categories. I automatically skip over anything categorized as romance, but by the urging of a friend, I got it and glad I did. It was a cute story that made me smile and a few times, actually laugh out loud. It's a fun and light read. The only character really given any depth is Lacey Terwilliger, but the other characters are colorful and delightful, especially her mother and brother.

The story, in the simplest of terms, is girl meets boy, they marry, boy cheats on girl with younger version, girl reacts publicly, girl meets new boy on journey of finding herself. What I liked about this book is that it seems like a realistic path of a person in that situation. She wasn't just depressed, but had periods of sadness & loneliness as well as moments of empowerment, freedom and even happiness. Although she was scared of going into the unknown future, she was going to do it on her own terms, at her own pace and with her pride, wit, strength and sass intact.

The narrator was really good. This is the first time I heard narration by Amanda Ronconi. I thought she was absolutely excellent with the female characters. I gave 4 stars because I felt she struggled a little with the lower registered male voices. Very minor, but noticeable. I enjoyed her and look forward to hearing more narrations by her.

I also enjoyed the writing style of Molly Harper and look forward to reading more of her works. I thought it was really good, although there were a few times, I felt the writing was a bit juvenile. PS., I would love to get a book on the exploits of Emmet. He definitely seemed like he has stories to tell.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Assassin's Fate

  • Book III of the Fitz and the Fool trilogy
  • By: Robin Hobb
  • Narrated by: Elliot Hill
  • Length: 39 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2,202
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,049
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,044

More than 20 years ago, the first epic fantasy novel featuring FitzChivalry Farseer and his mysterious, often maddening friend the Fool struck like a bolt of brilliant lightning. Now New York Times best-selling author Robin Hobb brings to a momentous close the third trilogy featuring these beloved characters in a novel of unsurpassed artistry that is sure to endure as one of the great masterworks of the genre.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • why does Althea sound like an 80 year old man?

  • By William on 05-23-17

It's So Hard To Say Goodbye

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-18-17

I would like to thank audible for making Fool's Errand a daily deal because without that, I don't think I would have ever stumbled across this magnificent series.

I would like to state that, if you haven't read the previous books (All fitz & fool books, liveship traders and rain wild chronicles), please do! Without that foundation, you will not really appreciate all the groundwork laid for this trilogy.

I listened to the last 2-3 chapters of this book while driving... I do not recommend that...lol All the feels and emotions that surface are definitely a testament to the greatness of Robin Hobb's writing skills. You relive the journey from book 1 and realize how much you've grown to love these characters and how they are part of you. It was a wonderful and bittersweet journey. I think I'm still in denial about this being the last book (hopefully it won't be :D).

This book was a bit more dark and graphically detailed than the other novels. It picks up right where book 2 left off. We see the adventures/struggles from Bee and Fitz POV. There is a lot of foreshadowing in the opening narration of each chapter, which I liked. You would have an idea of what is coming, but then again, you don't and still be managed to be surprised.

As for the narrator. I knew since they didn't change him in book 2, we were gonna have him in book 3 as well. Elliot wasn't bad, but he was my least favorite narrator of all the Realm of the Elderlings narrators. Some parts were better than others. I didn't like his voicing of certain characters, but the thing that bothered me the most was his inconsistent pronunciation of Vivacia. That really irked me.

All is all, this is one of the best literary works that I've ever come across. When you have to pause, absorb and marinate on the end, then you know you've been treated to something special. Ms. Hobb, I cannot thank you enough for creating and sharing this world with us. Words cannot express my gratitude. I'll always be ready for the hunt!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Criminal Defense

  • By: William L. Myers Jr.
  • Narrated by: Peter Berkrot
  • Length: 13 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,358
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2,103
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,078

When a young reporter is found dead and a prominent Philadelphia businessman is accused of her murder, Mick McFarland finds himself involved in the case of his life. The defendant, David Hanson, is Mick's best friend, and the victim, a TV news reporter, had reached out to Mick for legal help only hours before her death. Mick's played both sides of Philadelphia's courtrooms. As a top-shelf defense attorney and former prosecutor, he knows all the tricks of the trade. And he'll need every one of them to win.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • The reader ruins it!

  • By Matthew Jarka on 05-15-17

You Think You Know.... But Do You?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-17

This book started off slow for me, but I think that had more to do with the narrator than it did the writing. There were quite a few characters introduced in short succession and their voices did not sound all that different, so it took me a while to sort them all out. The narrator was subpar for the first third of the book. Everyone talking sounded like a version of Clint Eastwood talking thru gritted teeth with an edge, even on the most meaningless of text. It was truly annoying. I wanted to scream, there are more emotions other than bitter angst! but Peter eventually got much better the 2nd and 3rd parts of the book. His voice started to come alive at the trial and it only got better from there. I finally started to relate and feel the characters. I give Peter Berkrot 3 stars because I thought about quitting the book several times from his beginning narration.

But I am so glad I did not! This book is full of twist and turns; some very obvious and others catch you by surprise. I really enjoyed the trial. It was well written and I felt like a juror because I didn't know who did what either, even with the internal thoughts of the main character. The writing from the trial forward kept me hanging on until the end. The reveals are wonderfully executed and timed just right. I am impressed with the debut novel from William Myers and look forward to more legal dramas from him in the future.

30 of 35 people found this review helpful

  • Evicted

  • Poverty and Profit in the American City
  • By: Matthew Desmond
  • Narrated by: Dion Graham
  • Length: 11 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,493
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,253
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,247

In this brilliant, heartbreaking book, Matthew Desmond takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge. Arleen is a single mother trying to raise her two sons on the $20 a month she has left after paying for their rundown apartment. Scott is a gentle nurse consumed by a heroin addiction. Lamar, a man with no legs and a neighborhood full of boys to look after, tries to work his way out of debt. Vanetta participates in a botched stickup after her hours are cut.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Former Property Manager

  • By Charla on 05-18-16

Intimate Cycle of Systematic Failure & Bad Choices

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-17-17

I honestly didn't know what to expect from this book. I chose this book because of the narrator, not the author or content. So i guess I'll start with the Dion. As always, Dion does an excellent job. I could listen to him read all day. He does an excellent job with the various voices and makes you feel their struggle, insecurities, worries and contentment. His narration makes the cases in the book more realistic than if I was just reading to myself.

As for the book itself, I was surprised at how engaging it was. I thought it would be a whole bunch of stats and studies, but it was a perspective book. It follows 8 families through their life of poverty for about a year in their own words. It shows a point of view of our country's poorest and how the cycle of the system and sometimes their decisions keeps them from prospering.

It was a very eye opening book. Things I thought I knew or assumed I knew were thrown out the window. It can become disheartening to see how a country with so many opportunities sets some of it's citizens up for consistent failure. Please don't get me wrong, the families showcased in this book made several bad decisions, but it seems as though when they want to do right; success is stacked against them.

It was also interesting to see the landlord's point of view. Although they seem harsh, I got the feeling that they had to be like that in that line of work or they would have been taken advantage of regularly. The neglect and sub-conditions was uncalled for though. One landlord seemed to take pride in how badly she treated her tenants.

What struck a cord with me the most are the children that were/are affected by the decisions of the parents. The poverty/evictions clearly shows the effects on the children. Outbursts of anger, lack of willingness to connect to people/items, hardening of hearts, partial education, etc... It seems as if they're in the pre-stages of the same cycle due to no fault of their own. It definitely makes you stop and think.

I would recommend this book. It gives you a different perspective about the casualties of a system that you may assume you understand. I believe the tenants and the landlords are both casualties, but most of all the children. I don't necessarily agree with all of the authors summaries at the end, but I do agree that something different must be done. I'll be pondering this one for a while.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Hate U Give

  • By: Angie Thomas
  • Narrated by: Bahni Turpin
  • Length: 11 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 15,413
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 14,376
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 14,334

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a story!

  • By Michael - Audible Editor on 06-14-17

Serious Situations Mixed with Serious Laughter

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-17-17

This book showcases life in both dark and light as it follows the fallout from a teen girl witnessing the murder of teen boy by an on duty police officer. The book addresses real life situations of gangs, violence, and profiling, to topics like; can mac n' cheese be served as a main dish? Although this book is fiction, it could read as a non-fiction in some parts. The descriptions and emotions of some of the more serious scenes show the inner turmoil and angst of people in those situations. The characters were humanized and Angie offered a point of view that is overlooked consistently in our world today.

I love and related to Starr and her family. Although Starr was the main character, I believe it was her entire family that made the book. Her parents provided some of the funniest scenes in the book. Angie was able to capture the struggle of a family who wants better their family life and surroundings, but also their community. If you choose one are you failing the other?

This book is geared to teens, but I would recommend it to teens, adults, elderly; well pretty much anyone (teen and older, some themes and violent descriptions may not be suitable for children). You will not be disappointed. There will be times you laugh out loud because there are so many moments in the book that are relatable and remind you of people in your life. I highly recommend this book.

As for the narrator, of course Bahni is excellent. She is one of two narrators that I will choose a book solely because of who's reading without taking the author or description into consideration. She can probably make reading the dictionary sound exciting.

I look forward to reading more works by Angie Thomas. She will definitely be on the "one to watch" list because she knocked it out the park with her debut novel. Can't wait to see what's next!

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Sugar

  • By: Deirdre Riordan Hall
  • Narrated by: Tara Sands
  • Length: 8 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,068
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 972
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 976

Sugar Legowski-Gracia wasn't always fat, but fat is what she is now at age seventeen. Not as fat as her mama, who is so big she hasn't gotten out of bed in months. Not as heavy as her brother, Skunk, who has more meanness in him than fat, which is saying something. But she's large enough to be the object of ridicule wherever she is: at the grocery store, walking down the street, at school. Sugar's life is dictated by taking care of Mama in their run-down home - cooking, shopping, and, well, eating.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Teen anti-bullying book.

  • By Xannasguy on 07-30-15

Life In (Reese's) Pieces!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-03-17

I just have to say, even though this is a teen book, I, (all grown up now) absolutely loved it and related to it. It took me back to my high school days when I saw other kids bullied but didn't really do anything about it. I thought my conscious was clear cause I wasn't the one doing the bullying. Now that I'm adult (and have added a few pounds), I know silently standing by was just as bad as if I was the bully.

The book is from Sugar's perspective, who tries to make it through life with what's she's be given (and it isn't a whole lot). Sugar doesn't have much control over her life and lets situations happen to her. She deals with her negative situations by overeating (a lot of my cheat day items ;-D). In this coming of age novel, you watch the growth of self worth and self love. The transformation by someone caring. The writers shows the effect and toll that mental and physical abuse can have over time, but also the power of love, self love and positivity.

The narrator does a great job for the most part. Only a few of the minor female characters sound similar, but the main characters are all distinct. She does a great job overall.

I would recommend this book, not only to teens but adults as well. Some situations can relate to office environments and sometimes we don't know what a person is dealing with in their home life. You can't help but reflect over your life after reading this book. Job well done.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Lock In (Narrated by Wil Wheaton)

  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 10 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,722
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,036
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,020

Not too long from today, a new, highly contagious virus makes its way across the globe. Most who get sick experience nothing worse than flu, fever, and headaches. But for the unlucky one percent - and nearly five million souls in the United States alone - the disease causes "Lock In": Victims fully awake and aware, but unable to move or respond to stimulus. The disease affects young, old, rich, poor, people of every color and creed. The world changes to meet the challenge.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fun! Things you might want to know:

  • By Alexis on 08-29-14

A Great Concept with Good Execution

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-16-17

I really enjoyed this book. This was my first book by John Scalzi and the premise was different than anything I typically read and the execution was pretty solid. There are two main reasons I gave this book 4 stars instead of 5. The first being the extremely slow start to the book. I get that he has to explain the universe, but it was so boring, technical and confusing. I think there could of been a better way to say the same thing in a different way. I wish he would of used the same technique as he did in the novella. The second was the dialogue. I felt like it was written by an amateur author sometimes and not an established one. In fact, I couldn't believe the book and the novella were written by the same person.

I think the narrator did an excellent job. It wasn't until I was finished that I learned there were two narrators for this book. I am extremely glad I got the male narrator. I'm usually not a fan of a woman doing male voices and being that the main character was male, I think I wouldn't have liked it as much. But then again, maybe the character became male in my head because I heard Wil's voice first. Wil varied his voice for all the characters and worked well with the dialogue he had.

I would definitely recommend this book. I actually hope that the author would make a series out of it and write a sequel. I would love to follow the adventures of Agents Vann and Shane.

I also enjoyed the novella at the end. I kind of wish that I listened to that first before the book; I believe it would have helped me understand the Haden universe quicker, It's not necessary to read the novella before the book, but that's the way I would recommend it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful