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Kevin Stokes

Fairport, NY USA
  • 47
  • reviews
  • 208
  • helpful votes
  • 55
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  • Donald J. Trump

  • A President like No Other
  • By: Conrad Black, Victor Davis Hanson - foreword
  • Narrated by: Tom Parks
  • Length: 8 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 69
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 60

Conrad Black, bestselling author of Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Champion of Freedom and Richard M. Nixon: A Life in Full, turns his attention to his "friend" President Donald J. Trump and provides the most intriguing and significant analysis yet of Trump's political rise. Ambitious in intellectual scope, contrarian in many of its opinions, and admirably concise, this is surely set to be one of the most provocative political books you are likely to listen to this year.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Balanced perspective of our president!

  • By Wayne on 05-18-18

An Honest Description of the President's Ascent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-27-18

A biography of Donald J Trump's life with no punches pulled. Although the author does think highly of the President, he doesn't shy away from describing mistakes also. The author knows the President through a business arrangement many years past. Much of the book is following Trump's business deals from boom to bust and back. Once it is time for the election, most of the material will be familiar to those of us that just lived through it, but is well presented. I think this is an excellent book in that it is the most objective book I have read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • American Pravda

  • My Fight for Truth in the Era of Fake News
  • By: James O'Keefe
  • Narrated by: James O'Keefe
  • Length: 9 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 357
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 327
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 324

The one real difference between the American press and the Soviet state newspaper Pravda was that the Russian people knew they were being lied to. To expose the lies our media tell us today, controversial journalist James O'Keefe created Project Veritas, an independent news organization whose reporters go where traditional journalists dare not. Their investigative work - equal parts James Bond, Mike Wallace, and Saul Alinsky - has had a consistent and powerful impact on its targets.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Ten Reason to listen this book.

  • By Ron on 01-27-18

O'Keefe impressed me. Thoughtful and fun.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-18

I expected a shallower book and was positively surprised. He makes a great point about how journalists today don't even try to go out and get the big story. Instead almost all of today's reporters just swallow up pre-digested slop from political talking points and social media and then disgorge it as news writing.

O'Keefe goes after the story, using hidden cameras to catch what people *really* think.

There are also lots of funny stories about the big stories, as well as the ones that didn't turn out very well. I really enjoyed this book.

  • Stonewalled

  • My Fight for Truth Against the Forces of Obstruction, Intimidation, and Harassment in Obama's Washington
  • By: Sharyl Attkisson
  • Narrated by: Laural Merlington
  • Length: 15 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 401
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 372
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 371

Seasoned CBS reporter Sharyl Attkisson reveals how she has been electronically surveilled while digging deep into the Obama Administration and its scandals, and offers an incisive critique of her industry and the shrinking role of investigative journalism in today's media.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Reporting

  • By Michael G. Boyd on 12-30-14

Sharyl hits the nail on the head again and again

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-20-18

I've run across multiple people on social media commenting on how it feels like we are in a 'clown car world' all of the sudden. This is due in large part to reporters abandoning the truth in favor of supporting a narrative. This leads to news stories that don't make any sense, or completely fake news.

This book is a great walk-thru during a time in which a great shift has taken place. I cannot recommend this book enough.

  • Lyssa's Dream

  • The Sentience Wars - Origins, Book 1
  • By: James S. Aaron, M. D. Cooper
  • Narrated by: Laura Jennings
  • Length: 10 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27

Captain Andy Sykes just wants to keep his family in one piece. Once a combat pilot for the TSF, he gave it all up for love and a family. But two years ago, his wife disappeared, leaving him with two mouths to feed: eight-year-old Tim and 10-year-old Cara. Since then, he's managed to scrape a living hauling cargo between the Jovian Combine and InnerSol. When a cargo run to Cruithne Station meets with more than one catastrophe, Andy finds himself accepting an offer a less desperate man would refuse: delivering an illegal AI named Lyssa.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Where is the 2nd Audible Book !?!?

  • By M. Haslip on 05-02-18

Excellent beginning to a promising series.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-18

First of all, I only finish about 1/3 of the books I purchase, so I'm not so easy to please. I not only finished this book, but I burned through it because I cared about the characters and wanted to know what happened. It is always a good sign when I still want to listen to my book after my commute is over.
It is not a perfect book. It does tend to do flashbacks at the moments where you'd rather stay in the present because something is going on. That was annoying at times.
However, I really did like the main character, which is a problem with many novels nowadays. Everybody wants to make the next GoT where everybody is a jerk, and anybody who is actually a good person dies a horrible death. Lyssa's Dream is not that. In addition, every character in the story seems three dimensional,
The children were realistically portrayed, and there is plenty of action. The realism was quite good, with just enough explanation of the technical detail without getting bogged down in geek stuff. The writing was good; The dialog seemed natural and unforced, the pacing was good, and the plot interesting.
In summation, I highly recommend Lyssa's Dream for science fiction fans and even non-science fiction fans, and I look forward to the next book in the series.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Fata Morgana

  • By: Steven R. Boyett, Ken Mitchroney
  • Narrated by: Macleod Andrews
  • Length: 12 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,481
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,402
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,391

At the height of the air war in Europe, Captain Joe Farley and the baseball-loving, wisecracking crew of the B-17 Flying Fortress Fata Morgana are in the middle of a harrowing bombing mission over East Germany when everything goes sideways. The bombs are still falling, and flak is still exploding all around the 20-ton bomber as it is knocked like a bathtub duck into another world. Suddenly stranded with the final outcasts of a desolated world, Captain Farley navigates a maze of treachery and wonder.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best one I have heard in some time!

  • By The Zombie Specialist on 10-10-17

Mix of WW2 war, romance and Sci Fi - pretty good.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-11-17

The author did a great job of describing what it was like to be on a B17 daylight bombing crew during WW2. Also, the continual banter sounds silly today, but accurate for the 1940's.

As far as what happened after the event, it was kind of hard to follow. I was never clear on what the Redoubt was and what the difference between the Well and the Redoubt was.

Much of the book is devoted to romance, which is unusual since the audience for a historical war/Science Fiction book would be less interested in all these forays off into mysteries of love.

The thing with the little mushroom made no sense to me at all.

However, overall, the book held my interest, which is not that easy to do, since I lose patience fairly often and stop listening. The writing is pretty good. If you are interested in WW2, Science Fiction and don't mind a love story, I recommend it.

  • Battle Hymn: Revelations of the Sinister Plan for a New World Order

  • By: John Scura, Dane Phillips
  • Narrated by: Greg Walston
  • Length: 15 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 178
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 163
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 163

This book presents frightening, but truthful, facts that will shake many of your deepest beliefs to the core. A dark plan, put into place centuries ago, has come to fruition. Consider

Battle Hymn

your wake-up call...

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Warning too late?

  • By ecx123 on 05-18-16

A serious, researched work well worth the listen.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-18-17

First of all - a note about the narrator. There are few words and names that get mis-pronounced, and at times it sounds a little like a synthesized voice. But in my opinion it is a very minor complaint. It will not ruin the book for you.

In most fields of study there frequently is one book that stands out above all other works as the authoritative masterpiece. Battle Hymn is such a book for study of the powerful forces which operate behind the scenes in most of the governments of the world.

While the first half deals mainly with how the world has been controlled by bankers. It is clear that this is where the author is most comfortable, since the information is right there for anybody who cares to research the financial history. I was astounded to learn that the Bush family earned their family fortune by financing Adolf Hitler's rise to power. Upon doing independent research I verified it was true, and how the Bush's political opponents did not use this is proof enough that powers at be were always running both horses in the races.

Also amazing was how the same circle of people and their offspring have flitted around from position to position, also in control of money and military forces. A great job is done following the key Illuminati families.

In areas where the evidence is circumstantial, such as G HW Bush's involvement in JFK's assassination and the attempt on Reagan's life, the author makes it clear that this is conjecture.

The 911 chapter is fairly well done. There are so many holes in the official story that it would take more than one entire book to cover them all. But the other does mention some of the more obvious facts at odds with the narrative. My favorites are the 13 cell phone calls recorded while the plane was at 30,000+ feet. It was simply not possible, ever, not even close. The Pentagon attack is the lamest, where a plane that stands 4 stories tall supposedly makes a whole one story high. How two 6-ton jet engines which burn jet fuel when operating supposedly melted and disappeared without a trace, and yet the victim's families are delivered personal effects including paper notes and driver's licenses.

In the more wild elements of Illuminati theories, such as aliens and demons, the author is careful to mention them, but offers reasonable explanations of why some people might believe this.

In later chapters, the mind control chapters are very well done. While it sounds rather out there, I recognized patterns right away. For example, how the victims are told they will rule the world. That is a line from the Evie's Crib website which should be very familiar to those familiar with the Wikileaks emails. 'Take advantage of this now, for in the future she will have the power of life and death over you.'

I cannot recommend this book enough. If you have curiosity about the theory of the Illuminati but do not feel very confident about it, this is the book that will bring it all together for you. How they are allowing this to be published is a mystery, because it is far beyond any of the other looney dis-info books out there.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • SJWs Always Lie

  • Taking Down the Thought Police
  • By: Vox Day
  • Narrated by: Bob Allen
  • Length: 6 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 221
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 208
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 205

Social justice warriors have plagued mankind for more than 150 years, but only in the last 30 years has their ideology become dominant in the West. Having invaded one institution of the cultural high ground after another, from corporations and churches to video games and government, there is nowhere that remains entirely free of their intolerant thought and speech policing.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Five stars – excellent!

  • By Consumer on 02-25-17

Feisty Anti-SJW warrior diatribe. Worth it.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-14-17

I purchased this on a lark. I did know who Vox Day was but I had heard of them. I kinda sorta knew what an SJW was. At first I thought he was a bit thin-skinned, going on and on about picking a fight with author John Scalzi about his boasts of number of visitors to his blog. Really? Who cares? I was getting unhappy. But I kept listening and didn't regret it.

Vox Day clearly is a tenacious SOB, perhaps not always in a good way. But I think he is absolutely right about SJWs. He made a brilliant point about SJWs putting their little leftist priorities ahead of everything else, including their employers. They are willing to drive any business or institution into the ground for some ill-defined narrative.

I call it a narrative instead of an ideology or a cause, because honestly there doesn't seem to be any intellectual content, just some kind of vague claims about diversity and tolerance. But there is one thing I do know from person experience, that some liberals have zero tolerance for anybody that doesn't at least smile and nod to whatever pronouncements they make.

If this book has a flaw, it was that he spend little or no time explaining what an SJW was. Why are their SJW's now when there weren't any around for most of my lifetime? What generates SJWs? Are they the new 'church ladies'? Are they part of some conspiracy?

I at least now have a better understanding of what GamerGate actually is/was. Vox Day is clearly intelligent and perceptive, but I think he could have done a better job with this book. I should have been enthralled and wanting to know more rather than ready to shut it off after the first few chapters. I gave it 5 stars for being a unique book that made me think, however.



3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Who Are the Illuminati

  • The Secret Societies, Symbols, Bloodlines and the New World Order
  • By: Frank White
  • Narrated by: Mysti Jording
  • Length: 3 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 48
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 49

Hidden behind the veil of their secret society the group known as the Illuminati have still managed to garner great attention and acclaim. They have been blamed for everything imaginable such as being the igniting force behind the French Revolution and being the real masterminds behind the 9/11 attacks. They have even been credited with assassinating both Presidents Lincoln and Kennedy, because these two celebrated presidents made the unfortunate mistake of trying to usurp their unquestionable power.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Sadly I didn't like this book at all

  • By Charles on 03-27-16

Yeah not really

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-09-17

I classify this as misinformation. The Illuminati have infinite cash reserves. They also own Amazon. This book is very difficult to listen to. Seek information elsewhere.

  • Moving Day

  • By: Jonathan Stone
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 9 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,094
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 987
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 988

Forty years’ accumulation of art, antiques, and family photographs are more than just objects for Stanley Peke - they are proof of a life fully lived. A life he could have easily lost long ago. When a con man steals his houseful of possessions in a sophisticated moving-day scam, Peke wanders helplessly through his empty New England home, inevitably reminded of another helpless time: decades in Peke’s past, a cold and threadbare Stanislaw Shmuel Pecoskowitz eked out a desperate existence in the war-torn Polish countryside, subsisting on scraps, dodging Nazi soldiers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a fantastic story... a real treat!

  • By Joe Crescenzi on 06-03-14

A good story is hiding somewhere in there

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-29-16

Moving Day is an oddity because the writing is so good while at the same time is so very bad. The story is very interesting, the characters good, and it is very satisfying to learn more about what makes the main character tick. However, the author frequently goes off on little forays into near poetry, much of it sounding like nonsense. The characters cannot seem to do even the most mundane things without having a life-changing epiphany. Many times it almost seems like a parody, with odd statements like "She was angry, terrified. And yet, at the same time she felt serene, calm like an afternoon by the pond on a quiet summer day." This is not an exact quote, but it seems like there is some kind of requirement the for each paragraph that moves the plot along, there must be two paragraphs of deep thoughts of the kind that normal people think only on the rarest of occasions.

While the author does have some good observations about some topics, such as what one's possessions really mean to the person, he ruins it by going over it again and again throughout the book without mercy.

However, I am quick to stop listening to books that I am not enjoying. In this case, the story was so interesting that I really wanted to know what happened. The author did a good job of foreshadowing, which always is enjoyable when you see how that detail did matter in the end.

One other thing that bothered me was the condemnation of the entire state of Montana as dumb, ignorant racists. That was unfair and quite ridiculous.

While I do not regret listening to Moving Day, I would not recommend it to others because I think there are other novels which have all the good qualities of this story, and at the same time don't make you wade through fields of over-stylized flowery prose.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Into the Dark

  • Alexis Carew, Book 1
  • By: J.A. Sutherland
  • Narrated by: Elizabeth Klett
  • Length: 9 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 483
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 455
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 456

At 15, Alexis Carew has to face an age old problem - she's a girl, and only a boy can inherit the family's vast holdings. Her options are few. She must marry and watch a stranger run the lands, or become a penniless tenant and see the lands she so dearly loves sold off. Yet there may be another option, one that involves becoming a midshipman on a shorthanded spaceship with no other females.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Charming, Enjoyable, Solid, FUN

  • By Gregory on 03-28-15

Odd Space Fantasy Coming of Age Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-02-16

I really liked this story despite it being completely ridiculous. The author has created a world where the people all act like it is the year 1800, and space ships are exactly like old sailing ships except for a few things.
The story itself reminds me of Horatio Hornblower, and also of Bloody Jack. Bloody Jack was an amazingly good story, with better characters. I gave this story four out of five stars because the writing seems a bit green. Everything seems a bit too pat.
The author goes to great lengths to make his spaceships being sailing ships, so much so that it is amusing at times. The narrator does a good job with the extremely British dialog. I do not finish many books I buy but I actually didn't want to put this down, and I've already purchased the next one.
Will say that if you like this book, give Bloody Jack by L A Meyer a listen also. I thought the first two or three books of that series was phenomenal.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful