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James

Chesterton, IN, United States
  • 29
  • reviews
  • 15
  • helpful votes
  • 42
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  • The Sin of Certainty

  • Why God Desires Our Trust More than Our "Correct" Beliefs
  • By: Peter Enns
  • Narrated by: Tom Perkins
  • Length: 5 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 278
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 245
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 241

With compelling and often humorous stories from his own life, Bible scholar Peter Enns offers a fresh look at how Christian life truly works, answering questions that cannot be addressed by the idealized traditional doctrine of "once for all delivered to the saints".

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Title may mislead the actual content

  • By Adam Shields on 05-26-16

A Breath of Fresh Air

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-13-18

Mr. Enns delivers an insighful reflection on valuable and often overlooked passages in biblical literature, passages that call into question the easy certainty of early faith. He builds a compelling case for trust being far more important in our relationship with God than any Creed or system or specific knowledge we may project on to God. He convincingly demonstrates that the dark times in our lives may actually be far more important in our individual faith journey than anything else because they force us to trust God rather than rely on our own limited ego and intelligence.

  • God Is Not One

  • The Eight Rival Religions That Run the World - and Why Their Differences Matter
  • By: Stephen Prothero
  • Narrated by: Paul Boehmer
  • Length: 14 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 223
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 130
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 126

At the dawn of the 21st century, dizzying scientific and technological advancements, interconnected globalized economies, and even the so-called New Atheists have done nothing to change one thing: our world remains furiously religious. For good and for evil, religion is the single greatest influence in the world. In God Is Not One, Prothero provides listeners with much-needed content about each of the eight great world religions.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Useful, but doesn't live up to its introduction

  • By Nassir on 11-03-10

A long-winded but helpful overview!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-03-18

Before reading this book, I had been tossed between the two extreme perspectives on religion in general - that either all religions are essentially the same in their exploration of the divine OR that all religions are poisonous and anti-intellectual. The type of secular perspective on religious literacy that Prothero advocates is an enlightening middle path similar to the concept of cultural mining advocated by Alain de Botton. I will be following up on several of the new perspectives I encountered here!

  • Independent Study

  • By: Joelle Charbonneau
  • Narrated by: Elizabeth Morton
  • Length: 9 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 547
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 491
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 494

Seventeen-year-old Cia Vale survived The Testing, as has Tomas, the boy she loves, and they have both gained admission to the University. She has a promising future as a leader of the United Commonwealth and no memory of her bloody testing experience, thanks to a government-sanctioned memory wipe. Cia should be happy but is plagued by doubts about the past and future.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great story, left me wanting more.

  • By Kimberly Rogers on 08-15-15

More twists and turns than the first!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-22-18

I very much enjoyed the developments in this novel! I wasn't sure if I would read the third book, but now I definitely will! The new characters and plot developments are much less predictable and keep the reader guessing...

  • Books That Matter: The Analects of Confucius

  • By: Robert André LaFleur
  • Narrated by: Robert André LaFleur
  • Length: 11 hrs and 52 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 132
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 120
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 119

With these 24 accessible lectures, enjoy an adventurous exploration of one of the world's most important philosophical texts. Filled with rich historical context, detailed close readings of key passages, expert interpretations of larger cultural trends, and stories of Confucius and his most notable students (and critics), these lectures are required learning for anyone who wants a solid understanding of Eastern philosophy - and the ways a single book can cross cultures and go on to inspire an entire world.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Weak content

  • By dean on 03-23-17

A Truly Enlightening, Engaging Intro

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-16-18

I am incredibly glad I listened to this course before picking up the Analects! It gave me much more insight into the text itself and the scope of it's impact on China as a whole.

  • The Course of Love

  • A Novel
  • By: Alain de Botton
  • Narrated by: Julian Rhind-Tutt
  • Length: 7 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 611
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 538
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 531

We all know the headiness and excitement of the early days of love. But what comes after? In Edinburgh a couple, Rabih and Kirsten, fall in love. They get married, they have children—but no long-term relationship is as simple as "happily ever after". The Course of Love is a novel that explores what happens after the birth of love, what it takes to maintain love, and what happens to our original ideals under the pressures of an average existence.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing, much needed retooling of the expectations and realities of Love

  • By Lydia on 07-04-16

A Truly Enlightening and Frighteningly Real Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-18

Throughout the course of this book, the reader is often uncomfortably close to Kirsten and Rabbi. At some points, the relationship is so tense and tragic that one is not sure how it might possibly work out decently well for the two. Sticking with it, though, was incredibly rewarding. With Botton's gentle guidance, one comes to see the ways in which, through idealism and romanticism, we all set ourselves up for the large and small challenges we experience in relationships. For this American idealist and romantic, these psychological truths were hard to swallow but some tough truths I desperately needed to hear. Rhind-Tutt's narration is spot on!

  • The Post-American World 2.0

  • By: Fareed Zakaria
  • Narrated by: Fareed Zakaria
  • Length: 9 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 600
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 495
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 501

Here is the New York Times and international best seller, revised and expanded with a new afterword. This is the essential update of Fareed Zakaria's analysis about America and its shifting position in world affairs. In this new edition, Zakaria makes sense of the rapidly changing global landscape. With his customary lucidity, insight, and imagination, he draws on lessons from the two great power shifts of the past 500 years - the rise of the Western world and the rise of the United States - to tell us what we can expect from the third shift, the rise of the rest.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good, but dated.

  • By mike on 08-20-12

An Eye-Opening Global Perspective

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-23-18

This book really opened my eyes to the lay of the land in terms of the macroeconomic picture and where America stands in the modern geopolitical picture. "The rise of the rest" is the overwhelming theme of this book, as the title suggests. As Zakaria suggests, America can act with prudence and wisdom on this stage it has helped to build, or it can react compulsively, like a petulant child... The trends documented here ten years ago are even more noticeable in the Trump Age.

  • Predictably Irrational

  • The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
  • By: Dan Ariely
  • Narrated by: Simon Jones
  • Length: 7 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,743
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,619
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,617

In a series of illuminating, often surprising experiments, MIT behavioral economist Dan Ariely refutes the common assumption that we behave in fundamentally rational ways. Blending everyday experience with groundbreaking research, Ariely explains how expectations, emotions, social norms, and other invisible, seemingly illogical forces skew our reasoning abilities.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well researched, well written, & well read

  • By Stephen on 03-18-08

Decent Intro to Behavioral Economics

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-09-18

While listening to this book, I vascillated between interest and boredom. The overall concepts were very intriguing, however the overly detailed description of some of the experiments conducted to test the ideas caused my attention to drift. I think that the book could have used a bit more editorial expertise in order to keep it from seeming like a textbook at points. However, the book did peak my interest in behavioral Economics which I will be reading more of...

  • On the Road: The Original Scroll

  • By: Jack Kerouac
  • Narrated by: John Ventimiglia
  • Length: 12 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 116
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 108
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 110

Though Jack Kerouac began thinking about the novel that was to become On the Road as early as 1947, it was not until three weeks in April 1951, in an apartment on West 20th Street in Manhattan, that he wrote the first full draft that was satisfactory to him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Classic Brought to Life

  • By yoguinha on 11-25-16

Absolutely Incredible

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-26-17

We are so blessed to have had Kerouac to tell us this tale - this perceptive portrait of a defining American age...

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Blue Like Jazz

  • Non-Religious Thoughts on Christian Spirituality
  • By: Donald Miller
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 7 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 650
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 509
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 505

In Donald Miller's early years, he was vaguely familiar with a distant God. But when he came to know Jesus Christ, he pursued the Christian life with great zeal. Within a few years he had a successful ministry that ultimately left him feeling empty, burned out, and, once again, far away from God. In this intimate, soul-searching account, Miller describes his remarkable journey back to a culturally relevant, infinitely loving God.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not what you think....

  • By D. Knight on 01-04-15

True to Its Title!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-17

This wonderful little book is the most down-to-earth, no-nonsense explanation of Christian Spirituality I have ever read. Walking with the author through the gradual stages of his spiritual maturity was fascinating. The informal tone of the book drew me in as well. Miller is a fantastic writer. As a non-Christian, I could easily see myself befriending Miller, and connecting with him on many many levels. If more Christians were as self-aware as Miller, Christianity as a whole would have a much better name for itself. We could all use more Don Millers in our lives. On many levels I do not agree with the theological conclusions Miller draws, but I think the ultimate point is that we could still approach each other with love and respect for our mysterious differences. My favorite scene is when, in the middle of Reed College's annual hippie fest, Miller and his Christian friends set up a confessional in the middle of campus - not to arrogantly accept the confessions of the festival participants, but to confess the sins of Christianity as a whole (along with their personal sins as Christians) to the drunk/buzzed/naked festival participants.

  • The Great Divorce

  • By: C. S. Lewis
  • Narrated by: Julian Rhind-Tutt
  • Length: 3 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,759
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,561
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,560

C. S. Lewis's dazzling allegory about Heaven and Hell - and the chasm fixed between them - is one of his most brilliantly imaginative tales, where we discover that the gates of Hell are locked from the inside. In a dream, the narrator boards a bus on a drizzly afternoon in Hell and embarks on an incredible voyage to Heaven. Anyone in Hell is invited on board, and anyone may remain in Heaven if he or she so chooses. But do we really want to live in Heaven?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow!

  • By Michelle Pierce on 08-22-14

A Thought-Provoking Allegory

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-17

As a non-Christian picking this up, I was admittedly skeptical. However, I promised myself I would keep an open mind. I was greatly rewarded. The humility with which Lewis recounts or constructs this dream sequence/Christian allegory won me over. I took away several lessons. Proceed in humility. Don't cling to petty, ultimately inconsequential bull shit. Trust in the mysterious power of light over darkness, joy over misery. All evil is a distortion of ultimately good, life-giving things. Any attempt to explain eternity and experiences of the eternal through the lens and language of time will not even come close to doing it justice. Even so, we should still attempt to have those glimpses and try to explain them. Don't commit the sin of certainty. Above all, keep eyes and ears and senses open to experiencing the divine within the everyday...