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Douglas

  • 49
  • reviews
  • 191
  • helpful votes
  • 71
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  • Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (Revised Edition)

  • By: Jesse Andrews
  • Narrated by: Thomas Mann, RJ Cyler, full cast
  • Length: 6 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 647
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 583
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 581

Up until senior year, Greg has maintained total social invisibility. He only has one friend, Earl, and together they spend their time - when not playing video games and avoiding Earl's terrifying brothers - making movies, their own versions of Coppola and Herzog cult classics. Greg would be the first one to tell you his movies are f*@$ing terrible, but he and Earl don't make them for other people. Until Rachel.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Disclaimer: This Indie Book not for Everyone

  • By FanB14 on 08-11-15

Like reading a movie script.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-12-18

I don't have an issue with the narration. My main complaint is that parts of the book are in a movie script style. This breaks me out of the flow of the story. It might be different in a text version but in a audio version it was quite jarring.

My other major issue is that Greg, the story teller/author, doesn't seem to have been impacted in any meaningful way by the events of the book, he's still the whiny little boy we're shown at the start of the story. Perhaps I find this particularly irritating having lost family members to cancer.

I plan on watching the film this book supposedly inspired, perhaps it has more redeeming qualities.

  • Beware the Past

  • By: Joy Ellis
  • Narrated by: Antony Ferguson
  • Length: 11 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 14
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 14

When Matt Ballard was starting out his career, three boys were murdered in the same area, the remote and bleak Gibbet Fen. When the main suspect was killed in a hit-and-run, the killings stopped. But Matt was not satisfied that the real murderer had been caught. Over 25 years later, Matt gets a photo in an unmarked envelope. It's of the Gibbet Fen crime scene. And the picture was taken before the murder took place. More photos arrive, relating to the historic murders, as well as intimate pictures of Matt's very secret private life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Author Joy Ellis knows how to build suspense!

  • By Wayne on 06-04-18

An okay mystery

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-06-18

Let's deal with the narration first... it's horrible. It's inconsistent and at some points the female characters sound like bass-toned males.

My main complaint with this book is that Matt Ballard the DCI is happily having a romantic affair with one of his subordinates. It's very clear that it's consensual; however, at one point the killer does something and all our hero can worry about is that his illicit sexual romps with his married colleague will be found out. Really? I think if I was in Matt's place I'd be worrying about a few others things first. I know I'm being vague about what the killer did but I thought it was interesting and don't want to spoil it.

At the end of the book there's a scene with Matt, his lover and the lover's husband in the same room. The author could have handled the situation in a classy way, instead the author decided to cheapen the moment by using a dues ex and let Matt completely off the hook.

I guess my biggest issue with this book is that I didn't like our hero. I found Matt's 2nd in command Jason and the killer to be more interesting characters. I'll try another of the author's books but I'll have to really enjoy it to read a third.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Plastic Magician

  • A Paper Magician Novel
  • By: Charlie N. Holmberg
  • Narrated by: Sarah Zimmerman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 307
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 273
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 272

Alvie Brechenmacher has arrived in London to begin her training in Polymaking - the magical discipline of bespelling plastic. Polymaking is the newest form of magic, and in a field where there is so much left to learn, every Polymaker dreams of making the next big discovery. Even though she is only an apprentice, Alvie is an inventor at heart, and she is determined to make as many discoveries - in as short a time frame - as she can. Luckily for her, she’s studying under the world-renowned magician Marion Praff, who is just as dedicated as Alvie is.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Kindred Spirit

  • By Caron on 06-04-18

Too many convenient incidents.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-17-18

I generally liked this book, though I didn't have the same style as the original trilogy, nor did I particularly like Alvie. I think the main issue I have with the book is that there were just too many convenient happenings that seemed to solve things. For example Alvie's mentor has been searching for something to dazzle the crowds at the upcoming convention and Alvie just so happens to stumble upon a woman who needs help and that help will be the breakthrough Alvie's mentor has been searching for. Never mind this incident was telegraphs near the start of the book.

We don't see many of the characters from the first set of books, which is disappointing. So while I did enjoy the book as a light read, I was hoping for more.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Secondborn

  • Secondborn, Book 1
  • By: Amy A. Bartol
  • Narrated by: Kate Reinders
  • Length: 11 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,497
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,344
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,351

Firstborns rule society. Secondborns are the property of the government. Thirdborns are not tolerated. Long live the Fates Republic. On Transition Day, the second child in every family is taken by the government and forced into servitude. Roselle St. Sismode's eighteenth birthday arrives with harsh realizations: she's to become a soldier for the Fate of Swords military arm of the Republic during the bloodiest rebellion in history, and her elite firstborn mother is happy to see her go.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Bella Swan's Cousin

  • By zereader01 on 02-14-18

A sloppy Insta-loving mess

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-17-18

What started out as an interesting story quickly spiraled into violence, incoherent scene changes and Insta-love. I really enjoy strong female lead characters but our main heroine in the book is... "rescued" by a guy she almost instantly falls for. A couple of chapters later she does something that would have gotten killed but there's nothing int he background we're given that would indicate she should act that way.

I did want to like this book but I just can't.

  • The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore

  • By: Kim Fu
  • Narrated by: Tavia Gilbert, Soneela Nankani, Sophie Amoss, and others
  • Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 26

A group of young girls descends on Camp Forevermore, a sleepaway camp in the Pacific Northwest, where their days are filled with swimming lessons, friendship bracelets, and camp songs by the fire. Filled with excitement and nervous energy, they set off on an overnight kayaking trip to a nearby island. But before the night is over, they find themselves stranded, with no adults to help them survive or guide them home. The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore traces these five girls through and beyond this fateful trip.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Horrible and misleading

  • By Douglas on 05-10-18

Horrible and misleading

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-18

I, like many, believed this book to be about a group of girls who went to camp and through a series of events were left on their own and how they managed to survive until rescue came. The camping part was contained in about 4 chapters. The other chapters dealt with the girls as adults and none of them were happy. What's more, the girls descended in a "Lord Of The Flies" light mode, at one point tying up the one girl and when she begs to be untied they refuse even though the ropes are injuring her.

It really wasn't the book it's being peddled as. I'd return it but I don't want to waste one of my return slots on this piece of trash.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Small as an Elephant

  • By: Jennifer Richard Jacobson
  • Narrated by: William Dufris
  • Length: 5 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 91
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 89

When 11-year-old Jack Martel crawls out of his pup tent on the first morning of his camping trip with his mom in Acadia National Park, he notices right away that something isn’t right. Where is his mom’s tent, and their rental car? And where is his mom? Any other kid might panic, might even go to the police. But Jack isn’t like other kids. And his mom isn’t like other moms. Jack knows that it’s up to him to find his mom before someone figures out what’s happened and separates them forever. But finding his mom in the state of Maine isn’t the same as finding her in their neighborhood back in Boston.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Tender story involving mentally ill mother

  • By Lynn on 05-14-15

Not what I was expecting

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-18

I typically like William Dufris' narration but his style simply didn't suit the main character of this book.

I wanted to like this book, a friend of mine recommended it to me. Sadly I just didn't like it, probably because I disliked the ending quite a lot but I can't detail why without ruining the book.

Perhaps I'm missing something but I think the author wanted a particular ending and forced the story that way rather then letting it flow naturally.

  • Daughter of the Blood

  • Black Jewels, Book 1
  • By: Anne Bishop
  • Narrated by: John Sharian
  • Length: 16 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,224
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 974
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 987

Seven hundred years ago, a Black Widow witch saw an ancient prophecy come to life in her web of dreams and visions. Now, the Dark Kingdom readies itself for the arrival of its queen, a witch who will wield more power than even the High Lord of Hell himself. But she is still young, still open to influence - and corruption.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Walk on the Dark Side of Fantasy

  • By Bexlyn Wright on 06-07-10

Melodramatic and badly plotted

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-01-18

About the only decent thing about this book was the narration.

Several dozen POVs, none of which I want to care about very much and a five-year time jump. The "evil" characters are interchangeable and some of the mysteries that we're supposed to want solved aren't even fascinating or intriguing.

The characters are presented as being one thing but then spend the rest of the novel as something else and taking actions that make absolutely no sense what so ever.

I think what irritates me the most is that there's no context for locations. The author speaks of territories, cities and realms and seems to intermix them. Is a "territory" part of an island? a continent? a tract of land? I'm not sure because the book never makes such things clear. Does a realm refer to a nation? a city state? again this isn't made clear. To add to this confusion there's, what I would describe as, dimensions.

It's a mess and I won't be continuing with the second novel.

  • Arrows of the Queen

  • Heralds of Valdemar Series, Book 1
  • By: Mercedes Lackey
  • Narrated by: Christa Lewis
  • Length: 9 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 119
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 111
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 111

Chosen by the Companion Rolan, a mystical horse-like being with powers beyond imagining, Talia, once a runaway, has now become a trainee Herald, destined to become one of the Queen's own elite guard. For Talia has certain awakening talents of the mind that only a Companion like Rolan can truly sense. But as Talia struggles to master her unique abilities, time is running out. For conspiracy is brewing in Valdemar, a deadly treason that could destroy Queen and kingdom. Opposed by unknown enemies capable of both diabolical magic and treacherous assassination, the Queen must turn to Talia.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • absolutely brillant

  • By Amazon Customer on 04-07-18

Mary Sue moments abound

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-31-18

Talia began the story in a very contradictory fashion. As a "Holder girl" shouldn't know how to read yet she does. There's not a lot of time spent explaining who taught her or even why she was allowed to continue the practice. It's stated that she's trusted to run errands for the elders of her family and look after the younger children and not more then a few minutes later it's stated that a serious incident occurred with one of the younger children because she was busy daydreaming.

I could except this as a clumsy attempt to show how "repressed" she was without crushing her spirit but almost as soon as she runs away from her family the Mary-Sue syndrome kicks in. She just "happens" to fall down a steep embankment and meets up with her companion. The trip to the city is smoothed without so much as a hitch.

The "trouble" Talia starts to encounter magically vanishes. The "problem" child no other adult could tame but Talia (who's 13) apparently will be able to manages the deed within a couple of weeks. I could overlook this if Talia's family life had been a very healthy and positive one. Since it wasn't her "super nanny" abilities just add to the Mary Sue-isms.

The fact that this is an established author and not a new one makes the cliches that much more disappointing.

1 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Bad Blood

  • By: Lorna Sage
  • Narrated by: Jenny Agutter
  • Length: 3 hrs and 1 min
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars 1

From a childhood of gothic proportions in a vicarage on the Welsh borders, through adolescence, leaving herself teetering on the brink of the 1960s, Lorna Sage vividly and wittily brings to life a vanished time and place and illuminates the lives of three generations of women.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Strong start that just died

  • By Douglas on 03-13-18

Strong start that just died

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-13-18

This book had a strong start and I was looking forward to a good read about the author's childhood and how she dealt with dysfunctional family. What I got instead was more philosophy and stream of conscience.

To call this a memoir is doing a disservice to the word. Rather then detailing day to day events the author seemed to spend most of the book talking about her childhood in nebulous streams of thought. The later part of the book made me wonder if it been added just to ride the #MeToo bandwagon but the book was published several years ago.

  • Child of a Mad God

  • The Coven, Book 1
  • By: R. A. Salvatore
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 18 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 379
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 349
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 350

From R. A. Salvatore, the legendary creator of Drizzt Do'Urden, comes the start of a brand new epic journey. When Aoleyn loses her parents, she is left to fend for herself among a tribe of vicious barbarians. Bound by rigid traditions, she dreams of escaping to the world beyond her mountain home. The only hope for achieving the kind of freedom she searches for is to learn how to wield the mysterious power used by the tribe's coven known as the Song of Usgar. Thankfully, Aoleyn may be the strongest witch to have ever lived, but magic comes at price.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Why did it have to end!!

  • By Think about this on 03-16-18

Was this ghost written for Salvatore?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-18

The story started OK with some setup but then it just dragged on and on. I found myself looking for the secondary chracter's parts rather then the main character because she was so incredibly boring. I started off the story caring but by the end I didn't.

I have a feeling Salvatore was counting on his name selling the book rather then actually producing a story that lives up to his reputation.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful