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Tim

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  • Red Sister

  • First Book of the Ancestor
  • By: Mark Lawrence
  • Narrated by: Heather O'Neill
  • Length: 19 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,294
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,143
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,140

From the international best-selling author of the Broken Empire Trilogy comes the first in a brilliant new breakout fantasy series. A searing novel set in a brand-new world, this series follows a young girl who enters a convent where girls are selected to train in religion, combat, or magic. Nona is selected to learn combat and finds herself at the center of an epic battle for empire on the outer reaches of a dying universe.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Story supported by great narration

  • By jdykes33 on 04-15-17

Very Gung Ho

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-16-18

It's hard to tell that I will be continuing on with Books of the Ancestor series. "Red Sister" is very well written and extremely well constructed. This is why I gave this book four stars, but (there is always a but), the first book in the series was too much fantasy for me to accept. If you happen to be a feminists, you will enjoy this series. By far, this is the best book to show girl power, but I also thought that it was very bias because all men are pigs and we all wear white beaters.

If there was a book where Wonder Woman came from, this world in "Red Sister will be it.

All of the women are very gung ho!

  • Sharp Objects

  • By: Gillian Flynn
  • Narrated by: Ann Marie Lee
  • Length: 9 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,647
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,657
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,673

Words are like a road map to reporter Camille Preaker's troubled past. Fresh from a brief stay at a psychiatric hospital, Camille's first assignment from the second-rate daily paper where she works brings her reluctantly back to her hometown to cover the murders of two preteen girls.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Pitch Perfect Performance

  • By theenglishmajor on 02-14-14

F'ed Up cuz' It's Realistic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-12-18

I have new found respect for Gillian Flynn. After reading her blockbuster hit a few years ago, I really thought she was a one hit wonder. Watching TV a few evenings ago, I saw a preview of "Sharp Objects" on HBO, a new miniseries. It sparked my interest at reading the book before the show debut next month.

The book is extremely well written in a way that you will run to the bathroom and try to vomit what you just read in the pages. Very dark story and it's so realistic that it will eventually F'ed you up because there are multiple layers in the plot. My kind of writer and surely my kind of book.

The plot is so realistic that it truly can happen anywhere and can be a documentary of true crime. As I said before, the story has multiple layers. I will be visiting this book again, after the eight part miniseries is over.

  • Saturn Run

  • By: John Sandford Ctein
  • Narrated by: Eric Conger
  • Length: 16 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,370
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,201
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,192

The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope - something is approaching Saturn and decelerating. Space objects don't decelerate. Spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: Whatever built that ship is at least one hundred years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Best Sci-Fi Book in a While!

  • By Ted on 05-29-17

No Buildup Dialogue

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-07-18

"Saturn Run" has been on my wish list for a long time. I was compelled to get it right after I read the Martian, but since there were so many other books that I wanted to read that my wish list got longer and longer. When I saw Saturn Run on a 2 for 1 sale, I jumped to a chance of getting this book. My wish list is one less book shorter because of Audible.

John Sandford Ctein's sci fi fantasy was very good at the beginning and I was fully engaged to the story, but I felt that it was missing something. There was too much narration telling about the mission to Saturn, instead of building up each characters and each of their dialogue. The book almost became like a mockumentary. Also, there was too much play with China, who would get to the rings first and trade war. I really thought that I was watching Fox News, on how the Chinese were stealing our intellectual properties.

I felt that this author had plenty of time to expand the world, but his ideas were very limited. The whole China idea lost me and I started to think that I was listening to Planet Money on NPR, instead reading a mission to another dimension.

  • In the Kingdom of Ice

  • The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the USS Jeannette
  • By: Hampton Sides
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 17 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,982
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,805
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,804

In the late nineteenth century, people were obsessed by one of the last unmapped areas of the globe: The North Pole. No one knew what existed beyond the fortress of ice rimming the northern oceans. On July 8, 1879, the USS Jeannette set sail from San Francisco to cheering crowds in the grip of "Arctic Fever." The ship sailed into uncharted seas, but soon was trapped in pack ice. Two years into the harrowing voyage, the hull was breached. Amid the rush of water and the shrieks of breaking wooden boards, the crew abandoned the ship.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great found story

  • By Dennis Hinkamp on 08-28-14

​Best Survival Story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-18

​"In the Kingdom of Ice" is one of the best survival books that you will ever read. It is gorgeously written because its a true story. USS Jeannette was on a mission to travel to the North Pole that no man has gone, but yet the crew of 32 men got ship wreck for two years in​ ​​frozen land and had to survive. This might be an easy rescue mission by today's standards, but in the late 1800's, the voyage to uncharted water was like the first man stepping on the moon in 1969.

If we didn't have wealthy people like James Gordon Bennettwith ludicrous ideas, like sailing to the North Pole, we might not have Elon Musk, planning a journey to Mars. Or other ideas for the naysayers to argue about.

  • The Outsider

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Will Patton
  • Length: 18 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,578
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,985
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,945

An 11-year-old boy's violated corpse is found in a town park. Eyewitnesses and fingerprints point unmistakably to one of Flint City's most popular citizens. He is Terry Maitland, Little League coach, English teacher, husband, and father of two girls. Detective Ralph Anderson, whose son Maitland once coached, orders a quick and very public arrest. Maitland has an alibi, but Anderson and the district attorney soon add DNA evidence to go with the fingerprints and witnesses. Their case seems ironclad.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Will the real Stephen King please stand up?

  • By A Tack on 06-15-18

A Constant Reader being rejuvenated

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-28-18

For the first time in a long time, Stephen King is back to his old tricks again and has brought back horror and being even more creepier. If you are a Constant Reader, like I am, you know that King has been going soft in his storytelling for the past decade or so. There has been many hits and misses from the Master of Horror. In "The Outsider", King has drug out his mind from writing scripts for movies and tv shows and wrote 576 pages or over 18 hours in audio of most disturbing subjects and along with complex characters.

Some of the characters are from the past novels, which I absolutely enjoyed. I have been waiting for this book for a long time. SK has been building us up to this book by writing sub par novels and many two stars reviews from the past and leading the Constant Reader confused. We have finally seeing the gold star sticker from Stephen King.

"The Outsider" has rejuvenated this Constant Reader again. I should had never doubted SK.

Maybe it's time to get another reader other than Will Patton to preform the next audiobook for Stephen King? Patton's voice was really annoying to listen to, especially the main female character.

0 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Gone World

  • By: Tom Sweterlitsch
  • Narrated by: Brittany Pressley
  • Length: 13 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 299
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 273
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 274

Shannon Moss is part of a clandestine division within the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. In Western Pennsylvania, 1997, she is assigned to solve the murder of a Navy SEAL's family - and to locate his teenage daughter, who has disappeared. Though she can't share the information with conventional law enforcement, Moss discovers that the missing SEAL was an astronaut aboard the spaceship USS Libra - a ship assumed lost to the darkest currents of Deep Time.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What an amazing find!

  • By Veronica on 03-07-18

NCIS Libra

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-22-18

This book is gear more to NCIS fans than science fiction, but the time travel kept me reading and reading. Tom Sweterlitsch is a good writer. He combines time travel, true crime, and detective all into one lump sum that actually works pretty well. The time travel phase leaves you a bit confused in between chapters, but it's pretty easy where you left off.

"The Gone World" will eventually be a movie or a miniseries. Maybe CBS will buy the rights on this book and have a show call NCIS Libra.

  • The Orphan's Tale

  • By: Pam Jenoff
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Wydra, Kyla Garcia
  • Length: 12 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,863
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,650
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,637

Sixteen-year-old Noa has been cast out in disgrace after becoming pregnant by a Nazi soldier and being forced to give up her baby. She lives above a small rail station, which she cleans in order to earn her keep. When Noa discovers a boxcar containing dozens of Jewish infants bound for a concentration camp, she is reminded of the child that was taken from her. And in a moment that will change the course of her life, she snatches one of the babies and flees into the snowy night.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Sappy and tedious

  • By Churchill on 03-23-17

A Little Far Fetch

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-12-18

I'm a sucker when it comes to WWII stories, fiction or nonfiction. I will pretty much read anything from this period of time. I prefer reading true stories of this historical event, but I also like fictions because this war had many human interest stories that we have to wonder that some of this made up stuff could had happened. Never doubt of our past, even some of it was made up.

"The Orphan's Tale" is really not a bad read. I actually somewhat enjoyed it for the first part of the book. The story became a little far fetch for me to comprehend on how much accuracy the author did to prepare to write this book. I found myself yawning a lot and dozing off during the second part. I don't really find to be Pam Jenoff an excellent writer. Her writing is somewhat sloppy and she brings recurrent themes over and over.

The story ended up failing for me because it was brightly written. Instead of understanding the hardship, torture and survival, the travelling circus became a maskerade of what has been documented from the true heroes.

I wished that the story was darker. I found that there was too much sunshine, but yet I finish this book within a day.

  • The Heart of Everything That Is

  • The Untold Story of Red Cloud, An American Legend
  • By: Bob Drury, Tom Clavin
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 12 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 569
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 507
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 506

The great Oglala Sioux chief Red Cloud was the only Plains Indian to defeat the United States Army in a war, forcing the American government to sue for peace in a conflict named for him. At the peak of their chief’s powers, the Sioux could claim control of one-fifth of the contiguous United States. But unlike Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, or Geronimo, the fog of history has left Red Cloud strangely obscured. Now, thanks to painstaking research by two award-winning authors, his incredible story can finally be told.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Couldn't put it down!

  • By Rick on 12-24-13

Forgotten History

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-18

"The Heart of Everything That Is" is the best history book that I have read on Native Americans and Red Cloud. I have to admit that when I was in school, I learned very little on the Indians, other than bringing corn to the Pilgrims and Mayflower. Sadly that was my half hour history lesson on the natives. As I've gotten older and expand my mind on history, I always wanted to know more about the people who was here on the motherland. This is an excellent book on the forgotten history on how violent the war was with the Natives and the foreigners who took over their lands.

  • The Man Who Fell to Earth

  • By: Walter Tevis
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 6 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 324
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 241
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 246

Thomas Newton is an extraterrestrial, one of only 300 left on his home planet. Using his superior intelligence and skills, Newton amasses a small fortune and a business empire, but soon must battle unexpected foes: the CIA, alcoholism, loneliness, himself. An utterly absorbing psychological study of one man's struggle to survive on 20th-century Earth.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not uplifting, but a well told story

  • By Paul on 02-24-15

Time Capsule from the Past

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-07-18

Unlike American literature, it's very hard to categorize any science fiction novels to be a classic because they all seem to be very dated once you read them after their times. You really want to read the science fiction books as soon as they are published or else anything after that becomes a time capsule from the past. "The Men Who Fell to Earth" was very dated because it was published in 1963 and the technology that was written back then already came and went into the future. I'm not really sure that any science fiction stories should be label as a classic because technology is changing constantly and what was sci-fi back then, is not sci-fi now.

  • The Street

  • A Novel
  • By: Ann Petry
  • Narrated by: Shayna Small
  • Length: 12 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 213
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 190
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 188

As much a historical document as it is a novel, this 1946 winner of the Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship Award is the poignant and unblinkingly honest story of Lutie Johnson, a young black woman, and her spirited struggle to live and raise her son by herself amid the violence, poverty, and racial dissonance of Harlem in the late 1940s. Originally published in 1946 and hailed by critics as a masterwork, The Street was Ann Petry’s first novel, a beloved best seller with more than a million copies in print. Its haunting tale still resonates today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • awesome

  • By Family on 10-03-15

Never Age

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-04-18

A friend of mine suggested that I should read "The Street" by Ann Petry because it's a classic that I would like. I cannot believe that the book was first published over 72 years ago. The story about the hardship being Black or another ethnicity and poverty is more relevant now then the 1940's. The struggles are still the same even to the present day. This book is wonderfully written. This novel will never age because it's reality for most people that are poor. This is truly amazing piece of literature that doesn't need ironing to stiffen out the collars.