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SailingTs

NJ, USA
  • 17
  • reviews
  • 17
  • helpful votes
  • 91
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  • Team of Teams

  • New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World
  • By: General Stanley McChrystal, Tantum Collins, David Silverman, and others
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 12 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,957
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,613
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,615

Former general Stanley McChrystal held a key position for much of the War on Terror, as head of the Joint Special Operations Command. In Iraq he found that despite the vastly superior resources, manpower, and training of the US military, Al Qaeda had an advantage because of its structure as a loose network of small, independent cells. Those cells wreaked havoc by always staying one step ahead, sharing knowledge with each other via high-tech communications.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant

  • By Beth on 06-30-15

More than Advice

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-17

This book is more than just a business advice book. It explains the changes in our connected world. The most important concept was clarifying the difference between complex and complicated. Complicated refers to something that has many steps, but the steps are part of a predictable process, like building an airplane. Complex refers to the unpredictable nature of humans connected at the speed of light. A good book is able to take concepts in your head and clarify them into a known quantity. This is a good book.

The pace and style work well too. I like the reader and McChrystal chimes in to break up any monotony. Definitely worth a read for just about any business person or leader.

  • The Joke Man

  • Bow to Stern
  • By: Jackie Martling
  • Narrated by: Artie Lange, Jackie Martling
  • Length: 8 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 90
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 80

For the first time, Jackie "The Joke Man" Martling opens up about his life as a cast member and head writer for the comedy powerhouse The Howard Stern Show. In The Joke Man: Bow to Stern, Jackie tells of his beginnings as a working comedian and writer and his climb to the top on The Howard Stern Show. Jackie saw it all, and in The Joke Man: Bow to Stern he shares personal stories as well a look from behind the scenes at one of the highest-rated radio shows of all time.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • not a bad read

  • By mike margotta on 10-26-17

For Diehard Howard Stern Fans Only

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-21-17

This book starts out with a bad mic in a living room. The quality is barely audible. From there, Artie enters a studio and JAckie takes over.

The story is somewhat boring. There is a considerable amount of Rodney Dangerfield talk, but it seems to go nowhere. His jokes are decent, as always. Along the way he does give a little behind the scenes of the Stern show, but waiting for the exit discussion was not rewarding.

If you love the Stern show and listened for 20+ years, this book is worth tolerating. Otherwise, I would pass it up and read an Artie Lange book. That guy can tell a story. Jackie should stick to telling jokes.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

  • By: Edmund Morris
  • Narrated by: Mark Deakins
  • Length: 26 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,984
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,718
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,717

Described by the Chicago Tribune as "a classic," The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt stands as one of the greatest biographies of our time. The publication of The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt on September 14th, 2001, marked the 100th anniversary of Theodore Roosevelt becoming president.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent book, excellent narrator.

  • By Chris M on 11-11-10

Understand this Amazing Man

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-31-16

This is the first of THREE books. The author did a great job of describing the life of Theodore Roosevelt. If you have the time, this is the series to read. Very entertaining. I like biographies, but this series was better than most. Teddy was amazing and this book did his crowded life justice.

  • The Wright Brothers

  • By: David McCullough
  • Narrated by: David McCullough
  • Length: 10 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,009
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,054
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,035

Two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize David McCullough tells the dramatic story behind the story about the courageous brothers who taught the world how to fly: Wilbur and Orville Wright.

On December 17, 1903, at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Wilbur and Orville Wright's Wright Flyer became the first powered, heavier-than-air machine to achieve controlled, sustained flight with a pilot aboard. The Age of Flight had begun. How did they do it? And why?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Story but narration is a little boring

  • By Vince on 08-20-15

Great, Fun Read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-31-16

Another good book from David McCullough. He really knows how to weave together a good story. I felt like I was with the brothers on their adventure. The pace was perfect and the author kept me interested in every aspect covered. He really did a great job of tying up the loose ends at the end. Well worth the purchase.

  • Woodrow Wilson

  • A Biography
  • By: John Milton Cooper
  • Narrated by: John McDonough
  • Length: 36 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 139
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 109
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 107

John Milton Cooper, Jr., is widely acknowledged as one of the world’s preeminent Woodrow Wilson biographers. This thoroughly researched profile of America’s 28th president is universally hailed for its scholarship and insight into the life and career ofone of the nation’s most polarizing leaders.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Comprehensive...but a bit dry

  • By Scott on 10-02-10

One sided biography, poor storytelling

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-31-16

This book was a poor read. The narrator sounded tired. The book did not follow characters well. The author worships Wilson. He makes odd references and repeats them constantly. During Wilson's presidency, the author says he worked on a Sunday at least a dozen times. I get it, Wilson was religious, but it seemed like he worked every Sunday. Barely any time was devoted to America's involvement in WWI. In the last third of the book, the author blames every misstep of the president on his ailing health, even though his stroke was over a year away. He also makes it seem like every speech Wilson gave was tremendous and would have killed anyone else lacking Wilson's strength and resolve.

Perhaps Wilson is the problem, but the book did not help me understand the man. It lists his accomplishments, but spends little time on his errors. Sometimes I could understand his thought process and get a bit into his rationale, but for the most part, I felt like I was very much on the outside. This difficult book was not helped by the fact that I had just finished biographies on Teddy Roosevelt. Teddy did more each decade than Wilson seemed to do in his whole life.

The flow of the book is also an issue. The middle two-thirds of the book would get into a particular subject and then follow it years into the future. Without a transition, the book would then swing back to the moment the digression started and continue on the timeline. This was difficult to follow as sometimes I was not sure when the flash forward was over.

I would not recommend this book. It is too much hero worship and fails to weave together a nice portrait of Wilson. I plan to move on in history, but will need to read another biography to truly understand this man.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Colonel Roosevelt

  • By: Edmund Morris
  • Narrated by: Mark Deakins
  • Length: 24 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 548
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 464
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 462

Of all our great presidents, Theodore Roosevelt is the only one whose greatness increased out of office. When he toured Europe in 1910 as plain “Colonel Roosevelt,” he was hailed as the most famous man in the world. Crowned heads vied to put him up in their palaces. “If I see another king,” he joked, “I think I shall bite him.”

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The guy is amazing!

  • By Chrissie on 07-02-13

Good wrap up

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-03-16

This was a good finish to the trilogy. Wrapped up with good detail. Satisfied with coverage after his death.

  • Guns, Germs and Steel

  • The Fate of Human Societies
  • By: Jared Diamond
  • Narrated by: Doug Ordunio
  • Length: 16 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,916
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,212
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,211

Having done field work in New Guinea for more than 30 years, Jared Diamond presents the geographical and ecological factors that have shaped the modern world. From the viewpoint of an evolutionary biologist, he highlights the broadest movements both literal and conceptual on every continent since the Ice Age, and examines societal advances such as writing, religion, government, and technology.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Compelling pre-history and emergent history

  • By Doug on 08-25-11

Explains How Civilization Succeeds and Why

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-01-15

This was a fascinating book on the history of civilizations. If someone holds a prejudice about certain races or people being superior based on the fact that their culture dominated the world, then this book will put a major dent into that thinking. Jared Diamond makes a compelling case that the societies which came to dominate the modern world did so by advantages in their environment.

Overall, this book helped explain why some societies came to dominate others. It was not due to an innate advantage in intelligence from one population to another. Instead, certain areas of the world were easier to civilize than others. Once a society had the means of producing excess food, civilization could advance. Some people were conquered, while others adapted to new technologies and advanced it themselves.

I would definitely recommend this book to any reader interested in how today's societies came about. It will help debating racists that claim that one race's conquering another means they are innately superior. For me, this book gave a foundation in early civilizations that is lacking when studying them independently.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Autobiography of Santa Claus

  • By: Jeff Guinn
  • Narrated by: John H. Mayer
  • Length: 9 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 420
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 313
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 315

Jump on Santa's sleigh for a journey through 17 centuries of Christmas magic!

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • History and Christmas

  • By Mara on 12-14-08

Fictional History with Common Facts Tied In

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-15

This book will be familiar to people that know about the history of Christmas. The author takes the historical facts and weaves them in with fictional characters to make a nice story. I highly recommend listening without the kids before sharing as the author gives some people from history immortality and that may not fit in with a child's knowledge of history. It certainly would be tough for a child to explain this story to his or her friends.

The story itself is entertaining and is a nice trip through history. If you like Christmas stories in general, this will make a nice addition to your collection.

  • Christmas: Philosophy for Everyone

  • Better than a Lump of Coal
  • By: Fritz Allhoff
  • Narrated by: Gregory Itzin
  • Length: 11 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3

From Santa, elves and Ebenezer Scrooge, to the culture wars and virgin birth, Christmas - Philosophy for Everyone explores a host of philosophical issues raised by the practices and beliefs surrounding Christmas.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Gets You Thinking

  • By SailingTs on 02-27-15

Gets You Thinking

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-15

Nice collection of essays on Christmas. If you study the subject, this will be a good read to further your knowledge and have more questions than when you started. If you are looking for a nice Christmas story, this may not be the best story. Overall, this worked for me as someone who knows the history of Christmas and was looking to gets varied opinions on the subject.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Wars of Reconstruction

  • The Brief, Violent History of America's Most Progressive Era
  • By: Douglas R. Egerton
  • Narrated by: Eric Martin
  • Length: 16 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 89
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79

A groundbreaking new history, telling the stories of hundreds of African-American activists and officeholders who risked their lives for equality - in the face of murderous violence - in the years after the Civil War. By 1870, just five years after Confederate surrender and 13 years after the Dred Scott decision ruled blacks ineligible for citizenship, Congressional action had ended slavery and given the vote to black men. That same year, Hiram Revels and Joseph Hayne Rainey became the first African-American U.S. senator and congressman respectively.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Essential reading for all Americans.

  • By Becky on 09-23-15

Counter to Fictional Accounts

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-15

This was a compelling story about Reconstruction. It does not touch much beyond the social issues of reconstruction and its effects on the South. What the story excels at is showing the promise of the post Civil War reforms and how those reforms were ultimately rolled back by the South still fighting for its old order. Rather than move forward from the Civil War, the South regressed back to many of its problems and put off true social change for 100 years.

Particularly helpful is the way the book went beyond the 1880's and includes how the historians and fictional writers of the early 20th century tried to rewrite Reconstruction as a vengeful act of a few northern Republicans. Civil rights were not revenge. They were a right for the southern citizens and this book explains how close we were to that change and then how it was all rolled back.

I enjoyed the book and learned more about the time period. I wish the author had spent some more time on the northern social issues during this time. To put little focus on them leaves out the southern argument that Reconstruction was imposing a social order on the South that the North did not have.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful