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  • American Pharoah

  • The Untold Story of the Triple Crown Winner's Legendary Rise
  • By: Joe Drape
  • Narrated by: Aaron Abano
  • Length: 8 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,033
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,848
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,839

History was made at the 2015 Belmont Stakes when American Pharoah won the Triple Crown, the first since Affirmed in 1978. As magnificent as the champion is, the team behind him has been all too human while on the road to immortality.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An Audible freebie after 2018 Kentucky Derby

  • By Wayne on 05-29-18

listen to audio sample before buying

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-21-18

I could only listen to a little bit of this book. The narrator sounded, to me, as if he was reading to a group of young children. Others may not be troubled, but check the audio sample.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Murder on the Serpentine

  • By: Anne Perry
  • Narrated by: Jenny Sterlin
  • Length: 11 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 245
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 227
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 223

When Thomas Pitt is summoned to Queen Victoria's private chambers, he hardly knows what to expect. When she tells him that the body of one of her closest confidants - Sir John Halberd - has been found in the Serpentine, he knows he is facing his most daunting and dangerous investigation yet. Sir John was a man who kept many secrets, moving within a circle of the most powerful and prominent members of London society. And the more Pitt learns about Sir John's past, the more he puts himself and his loved ones at risk.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • murder on the serpentine

  • By karin lund on 04-26-17

A good book but needed editing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-17-18

This is the first Anne Perry book I've read. She writes well but I found a great many repetitious descriptions, e.g., "Lord Halbert (the guy whose death spurs the investigation) was a man who knew a great deal about a great many people," over and over again. It would have been a better book if cut down by 2 hours.

  • Stoner

  • By: John Williams
  • Narrated by: Robin Field
  • Length: 9 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,850
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,648
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,655

William Stoner is born at the end of the 19th century into a dirt-poor Missouri farming family. Sent to the state university to study agronomy, he instead falls in love with English literature and embraces a scholar's life, far different from the hardscrabble existence he has known. And yet as the years pass, Stoner encounters a succession of disappointments.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A fascinating book

  • By Mark J. Lura on 07-12-11

critics say "greatest forgotten novel"

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-18

Google the book and you will see reviews such as “One of the great forgotten novels of the past century” and “topped best seller lists all across Europe” in 2013.

  • Educated

  • A Memoir
  • By: Tara Westover
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 12 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 7,087
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,528
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 6,486

Tara Westover was 17 the first time she set foot in a classroom. Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, she prepared for the end of the world by stockpiling home-canned peaches and sleeping with her "head-for-the-hills bag". In the summer she stewed herbs for her mother, a midwife and healer, and in the winter she salvaged in her father's junkyard. Her father forbade hospitals, so Tara never saw a doctor or nurse. Gashes and concussions, even burns from explosions, were all treated at home with herbalism.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Couldn't stop listening!

  • By W. K. Caldwell on 02-23-18

Surviving a survivalist family

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-23-18

It is difficult to imagine life in a family led by parents who are religious extremists. While Westover's family is Mormon, the story isn't one of Mormonism. Like Islamic extremists who misinterpret Islam, Westover's parents misinterpret Mormonism, developing their own paranoid worldview. The author, with understandable reluctance and difficulty, escapes an abusive environment to succeed in the world's most rigorous academic institutions. The narrator is perfect.

  • The Secrets She Keeps

  • A Novel
  • By: Michael Robotham
  • Narrated by: Lucy Price-Lewis
  • Length: 11 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,686
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,367
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,296

Agatha is pregnant and works part time stocking shelves at a grocery store in a ritzy London suburb, counting down the days until her baby is due. As the hours of her shifts creep by in increasing discomfort, the one thing she looks forward to at work is catching a glimpse of Meghan, the effortlessly chic customer whose elegant lifestyle dazzles her. Meghan has it all: two perfect children, a handsome husband, a happy marriage, and a stylish group of friends, and she writes perfectly droll confessional posts on her popular parenting blog.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Secrets - but Nothing New here

  • By Marie on 09-09-17

good book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-17

A "good book" is, for me, a positive recommendation. No book is perfect but this is a good one. It is painful to listen to parts of it as it deals with the difficulties and dangers of having children. The narrator is top drawer.

  • Excellent Women

  • By: Barbara Pym
  • Narrated by: Jayne Entwistle
  • Length: 8 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,044
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 955
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 954

Mildred Lathbury is a clergyman's daughter and a mild-mannered spinster in 1950s England. She is one of those excellent women - the smart, supportive, repressed women whom men take for granted. As Mildred gets embroiled in the lives of her new neighbors - anthropologist Helena Napier; Helen's handsome, dashing husband, Rocky; and Julian Malory, the vicar next door - the novel presents a series of snapshots of human life as actually, and pluckily, lived.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Still Waters Run Deep

  • By Sara on 04-13-16

reminiscent of Seinfeld,

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-17

Seinfeld was famously a show about nothing. This 1952 book is a bit like that without the humor. It is a slow, pleasant story of a woman in the immediate post World War II interacting with neighbors and fellow congregants of her church. The fact that she isn't married is important to those she deals with and to her as well. She is an unfailingly polite and intelligent woman who does good works but allows others to demand to much of her. It is well written and well narrated; pleasant but not exciting.

  • No Simple Victory

  • World War II in Europe, 1939-1945
  • By: Norman Davies
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 20 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 466
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 244
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 240

If history really belongs to the victor, what happens when there's more than one side declaring victory? That's the conundrum Norman Davies unravels in his groundbreaking book No Simple Victory. Far from being a revisionist history, No Simple Victory instead offers a clear-eyed reappraisal, untangling and setting right the disparate claims made by America, Great Britain, France, and the Soviet Union in order to get at the startling truth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Best Account of WWII in Europe

  • By Nikoli Gogol on 12-27-07

What you don't learn in Saving Private Ryan

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-09-17

Here you learn than the US and Britain played a supporting role in the victory over Germany. That, at least, is the author’s view and he makes a good case for the proposition. Davies offers a critical view of how western historians have written about the war and consequently how the public views the war. We have downplayed if not ignored the Soviet role in defeating Germany. He asks you to name the six most ferocious battles of World War II. If any of the battles you picked were on the western front you’re wrong. The eastern front is where the most intense fighting took place and where an huge number of Russian soldiers died, far beyond what the men lost in the English and the American armed forces. Germany may well have prevailed had they not invaded Russia.

Davies also reviews the atrocities committed by the Allies. Germans, we learn, were the war criminals but our indiscriminate bombing of German cities and killing of civilians is passed off as collateral damage.

All in all, this is a terrific book, marvelously narrated by Simon Vance. It is full of numbers: soldiers, tanks, planes, divisions, deaths but listening to them being enumerated is sometimes overwhelming. One need not agree with Davies on all points, but it is hard to dismiss his thesis that the war was not a simple one that can be reduced to the D-Day invasion.

  • The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

  • A Novel
  • By: Rachel Joyce
  • Narrated by: Jim Broadbent
  • Length: 9 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,350
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,615
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,622

Meet Harold Fry, recently retired. He lives in a small English village with his wife, Maureen, who seems irritated by almost everything he does, even down to how he butters his toast. Little differentiates one day from the next. Then one morning the mail arrives, and within the stack is a letter addressed to Harold from a woman he hasn't seen or heard from in 20 years. Queenie Hennessy is in hospice and is writing to say goodbye. Harold pens a quick reply and, leaving Maureen to her chores, heads to the corner mailbox. But then Harold has a chance encounter, one that convinces him that he absolutely must deliver his message to Queenie in person.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful Walkabout

  • By FanB14 on 07-01-13

Remarkable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-01-17

Totally unprepared to walk 500 miles, the protagonist travels the long road with difficulty. The tale has him reminiscing of the past and meeting a host of interesting characters, some helpful to him, some not. The book has a bit of humor, just the appropriate dose. Jim Broadbent is fabulous. If a movie were made, he would be the perfect Harold Fry.
It's a thoughtful excursion into an examination of ones failings, real and perceived and the pitfalls facing couples in dealing with tragedy.

  • Girl Walks Out of a Bar

  • A Memoir
  • By: Lisa F. Smith
  • Narrated by: Hillary Huber
  • Length: 8 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 917
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 841
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 836

Lisa Smith was a bright young lawyer at a prestigious law firm in New York City when alcoholism and drug addiction took over her life. What was once a way she escaped her insecurity and negativity as a teenager became a means of coping with the anxiety and stress of an impossible workload. Girl Walks Out of a Bar explores Smith's formative years, her decade of alcohol and drug abuse, divorce, and her road to recovery.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Helped my real struggle with alcohol.

  • By LARECIA R BRISENO on 02-20-17

Read if you think you have a problem with booze

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-07-17

It's been awhile since I read an alcoholic memoir. Several of them were extremely helpful when I was first sober some 20 plus years ago. They can be very comforting, that is knowing someone else feels as you do about alcohol.
This memoir is good. It's well written and well read and is raw in its portrayal of an alcoholic and drug addict who, amazingly, kept her job during several years of horrendous behavior. It is surprising how clueless most of her family and friends are about handling her "coming out" with her addiction problems. Then again, along with the alcoholic, friends and family are often in denial.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Secret Agent

  • By: Joseph Conrad
  • Narrated by: David McCallion
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22

The Secret Agent is a Victorian terrorist tale that has found a new audience with today's audiences. Set in 1866 London, this book tells the story of Adolf Verloc, a shopkeeper turned anarchist.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Typically good Conrad but . . .

  • By Tom on 09-27-17

Typically good Conrad but . . .

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-27-17

Some publications have piqued interest in this book claiming it has relevance to today's terrorists.If that is why you are thinking of buying the book you will be disappointed. I think the modernity claim is demonstrably false. The terrorists here are inept in action and vague in their goals. That said, the book is a worthy read as Conrad's work typically is.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful