LISTENER

Mark Klaver

  • 2
  • reviews
  • 0
  • helpful votes
  • 2
  • ratings
  • America and the New Global Economy

  • By: Timothy Taylor, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Timothy Taylor
  • Length: 18 hrs and 49 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 113
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98

Globalization continues to be a force in our economic climate. And the origins of this globalized economy, its effects on important contemporary concerns, and its future trends are just a few of the intriguing issues you explore in these 36 lectures. Go beyond the economy of the United States and examine the recent history of economies in other countries and regions. As you journey with Professor Taylor through the last 50 years of world economic history, you'll explore international perspectives on the new global economy and develop a richer understanding of our increasingly interconnected world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Impressive; dates from around 2008

  • By Philo on 08-29-13

From 2008

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-21-15

This is a good course, but it's seriously outdated. Probably made in 2008. Definitely before the 2008 financial crisis fully erupted. So its relevance for international political economy is lower now.

  • Questions of Value

  • By: Patrick Grim, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Patrick Grim
  • Length: 12 hrs and 16 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 78
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 67

We live in a world seemingly dedicated to questions of fact and finance. What should I invest in? What school district is the house in? But the fundamental questions of our lives are actually questions of value: What makes life worth living? Are there values that transcend cultural differences? Is all value subjective?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Captivating

  • By M. Conneely on 03-16-15

A biased opinion on moral philosophy

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-15

This is NOT an impartial analysis of moral philosophy. It is a presentation with an AGENDA: the teacher wants to convince the listeners that his opinion on questions of value is the right one. He seems almost anxious to convince his audience that he is correct - often reducing the credibility of his own arguments. He does not give fair coverage of his opponents. On most issues, he quickly summarizes the debate before spending most of his time presenting his beliefs. But we didn't sign up for 18 hours on the beliefs of a teacher many have never heard of. Listeners are searching for an honest coverage of various perspectives, leaving open the possibility that different arguments warrant respect and consideration rather than rapid dismissal.

0 of 10 people found this review helpful