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Rachel

YAKIMA, WA, United States
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  • 271
  • helpful votes
  • 172
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  • Artemis

  • By: Andy Weir
  • Narrated by: Rosario Dawson
  • Length: 8 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50,345
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46,973
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 46,843

Jazz Bashara is a criminal. Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you're not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you've got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent. Everything changes when Jazz sees the chance to commit the perfect crime, with a reward too lucrative to turn down.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A ferrari with no motor

  • By will on 11-18-17

Excellent narration, great story.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-17

I was impressed with Weir’s first book and didn’t figure this one could be as good. But it’s pretty good. The narration is excellent.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The History of the Supreme Court

  • By: Peter Irons, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Peter Irons
  • Length: 18 hrs and 16 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 367
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 320
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 314

For more than two centuries, the Supreme Court has exerted extraordinary influence over the way we live our daily lives. This series of 36 clear and insightful lectures - delivered by an award-winning teacher and widely respected authority on the Supreme Court - answers many questions about the Court as it traces the development of the Court from a body having little power or prestige to its current status as "the most powerful and prestigious judicial institution in the world."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Professor's Bias Does Not Detract

  • By Bill Martin on 02-26-15

I want more!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-17

This was overall very interesting. I was surprised, at the end of some 18 hours of listening, that I could think of cases or justices that hadn't been covered. Of course, this was published/produced in 2003, which makes a difference. It was jarring, at first, when the professor indicated that there had only been 2 female justices. It was interesting, too, that the course seemed to include hints of where the court might be going in the future, even though the future for the course includes our past.

I thought the voice of the professor was quite enjoyable to listen to and I suspect he was speaking rather than reading, since he made a few mistakes that he immediately corrected. Clearly the professor has said many of the things in this course more than once, and he occasionally slipped into a familiar pattern, but I liked that the mistakes were left in, because it make the experience feel more real and less packaged.

I very much enjoyed the course. I legitimately want more--immediately. I wonder if an update might be planned. Until then, there is the podcast "More Perfect."

  • The Man in the High Castle

  • By: Philip K. Dick
  • Narrated by: Jeff Cummings
  • Length: 9 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4,821
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,422
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4,435

It's America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still survive hide under assumed names. In San Francisco the I Ching is as common as the Yellow Pages. All because some 20 years earlier the United States lost a war - and is now occupied jointly by Nazi Germany and Japan.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Alternative history

  • By Michael G Kurilla on 07-28-15

Cringe

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-17

First of all, the narration was cringeworthy. I felt embarrassed if this audiobook was on when anyone walked in the room. The narrator spends a significant part of the book talking in what sounds to me like an offensive caricature of a Japanese immigrant voice. I understand that the choppy sentences and irregular English was written into the book, but the narrator made it worse and it sounded like I was listening to somebody from the 60s pretending to be a baka gaijin--a stupid foreigner. ugh.

The likelihood of the characters in the book speaking exclusively in broken English aside (wouldn't there be a significant amount of Japanese mixed in?), I couldn't get into this book.
The idea sounded interesting, and perhaps without the obnoxious narration I could have done it, but I just couldn't keep everybody straight and I didn't care.

It felt like a long, drawn-out statement that Nazis are evil and Japanese people are either backward or mean or both. I lived in Japan for a bit and there are a lot of things about Japan I like. I know Japan after WW2 is very different from Japan before WW2, but there wasn't anything about the Japanese characters that I could recognize or even glimpse in this book. And I'm ok with starting and ending at Nazis are bad.

Maybe if I read this book... but certainly as an audiobook, no way.

  • The Righteous Mind

  • Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion
  • By: Jonathan Haidt
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Haidt
  • Length: 11 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,089
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,493
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,434

In The Righteous Mind, social psychologist Jonathan Haidt explores the origins of our divisions and points the way forward to mutual understanding. His starting point is moral intuition - the nearly instantaneous perceptions we all have about other people and the things they do. These intuitions feel like self-evident truths, making us righteously certain that those who see things differently are wrong. Haidt shows us how these intuitions differ across cultures, including the cultures of the political left and right.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Required reading... with one caveat.

  • By Amazon Customer on 07-14-13

No

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-16

I got this in anticipation of an upsetting and divisive primary season. LOL, it was way worse than I expected.
But this book was not useful for helping me understand people who disagree with me (and vise versa).
Apparently liberals have two things they care about and conservatives have 5 or 6? (its been a while since I listened to this). This was slightly interesting (and also I argued with the book a bit here) and then there was a lot more book with a lot less useful information.
disappointing.

  • Foundation

  • The History of England from Its Earliest Beginnings to the Tudors: The History of England, Book 1
  • By: Peter Ackroyd
  • Narrated by: Clive Chafer
  • Length: 18 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 557
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 510
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 508

In Foundation the chronicler of London and of its river, the Thames, takes us from the primeval forests of England's prehistory to the death of the first Tudor king, Henry VII, in 1509. He guides us from the building of Stonehenge to the founding of the two great glories of medieval England: common law and the cathedrals. He shows us glimpses of the country's most distant past - a Neolithic stirrup found in a grave, a Roman fort, a Saxon tomb, a medieval manor house.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Most Annoying Narrator EVER

  • By JudieBee on 12-25-15

Not Bad

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-16

I listened to this on a kick of listening to ancient/medieval/renaissance history. I found this book more interesting at the beginning, before it got to be a series of kings killing each other.
It was good, but not exciting. Informative, I guess, if you're kind of studying (like I was).

  • The Girl in the Spider's Web

  • A Lisbeth Salander Novel - Millennium Series, Book 4
  • By: David Lagercrantz
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 13 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,265
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,658
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 16,632

In this adrenaline-charged, up-to-the-moment political thriller, Stieg Larsson's Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist are back. The troubled genius hacker and crusading journalist thrilled the world in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire, and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest, which have sold more than 80 million copies worldwide.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • So thankful we still have Lizbeth!

  • By AudioAddict on 09-04-15

Excellent continuation

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-16

I enjoyed this book quite a bit. The story framework seemed different from the three original Millennium series books, but this was the first book I listened to, so that may have been the difference.
I thought this book was less violent than the previous three, but suspenseful and interesting. Lisbeth's character was familiar and heroic, but she didn't develop in this story, she played the same role as was built previously.
Good, entertaining listen.

  • Lincoln's Dreams

  • By: Connie Willis
  • Narrated by: James Lurie
  • Length: 7 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 90
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 82
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 84

For Jeff Johnston, a young historical researcher for a Civil War novelist, reality is redefined on a bitter cold night near the close of a lingering winter. He meets Annie, an intense and lovely young woman suffering from vivid nightmares. Haunted by the dreamer and her unrelenting dreams, Jeff leads Annie on an emotional odyssey through the heartland of the Civil War in search of a cure. On long-silenced battlefields their relationship blossoms–two obsessed lovers linked by unbreakable chains of history, torn by a duty that could destroy them both.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Last chapter not missing

  • By Julia on 04-23-15

decent, but not excellent Connie Willis

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-16

Given that Connie Willis is great, this was not my most favorite of her books or stories.
I thought the pace of this one was a little slow, and I wasn't super excited about the main weird thing going on in the story.
Published in 87, this is her second book (as far as I can tell) and it includes hints of what the great author will handle so expertly later (namely history, mysterious goings on, people trying to make a difference, etc), but just isn't as good.
If you're reading through all her books, like I am, go for it. It's not bad.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Likeness

  • By: Tana French
  • Narrated by: Heather O'Neill
  • Length: 22 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,718
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,294
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,284

Tana French's debut, In the Woods, hit the New York Times best-seller list and drew rave reviews from the Times (London) and Booklist. Picking up six months later, this riveting sequel finds Detective Cassie Maddox still scarred by her last case. When her boyfriend calls her to a chilling murder scene, Cassie is forced to face her inner demons. A young woman has been found stabbed to death outside Dublin, and the victim looks just like Cassie.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Really on a Different Level

  • By Michael on 07-05-10

Mostly good, a bit too drawn out

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-02-16

The accent of the narrator was excellent fun to listen to. The story was mostly enjoyable but things (like bad decisions by the protagonist) dragged on too painfully long for me. I felt let down by the ending, but on balance the book was better than average

  • Lafayette in the Somewhat United States

  • By: Sarah Vowell
  • Narrated by: Sarah Vowell, John Slattery, Nick Offerman, and others
  • Length: 8 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,111
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,944
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,933

From the best-selling author of Assassination Vacation and Unfamiliar Fishes, a humorous account of the Revolutionary War hero Marquis de Lafayette - the one Frenchman we could all agree on - and an insightful portrait of a nation's idealism and its reality. Lafayette in the Somewhat United States is a humorous and insightful portrait of the famed Frenchman, the impact he had on our young country, and his ongoing relationship with instrumental Americans of the time.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Already waiting for Sarah Vowell's next adventure

  • By Michael on 10-25-15

Sarah Vowell, enough said

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-16

Listen to this because listening to Sarah Vowell talk about history makes your world a better place. She's fascinated by the history so she makes the listener fascinated, too. She finds odd little bits of information too trivial to include in the history lecture or the textbook and she builds the story out of these bits, so that you've got this highly personal telling of the story.

And her voice. The best. Do not read this book, listen to this book.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Language Hoax

  • Why the World Looks the Same in Any Language
  • By: John H. McWhorter
  • Narrated by: John McWhorter
  • Length: 5 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 140
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 131
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 127

This short, opinionated audiobook addresses the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, which argues that the language we speak shapes the way we perceive the world. Linguist John McWhorter argues that while this idea is mesmerizing, it is plainly wrong. It is language that reflects culture and worldview, not the other way around.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I really love listening to language--and McWhorter

  • By Rachel on 03-24-16

I really love listening to language--and McWhorter

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-16

Maybe this type of thing is just my cup of tea. I've listened to quite a few books about the development of language including the Great Courses one by John H. McWhorter. I have consistently found them fascinating and well done.

This is a short book, mostly McWhorter refuting the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis with some explanation of what that is and a bunch of explanation of why McWhorter doesn't agree with it (or, really, why he doesn't agree with the popular culture understanding of it).

Even though this book repeated some stuff I was already familiar with, it's well done and interesting. McWhorter is a joy to listen to. He's funny, easy to follow and talks bout interesting linguistics stuff.

However, if you're ready to dive in and enjoy, I'd start with the Great Courses' "The Story of Human Language" also by McWhorter--it's significantly longer and packed with information. I'm just going to sit her waiting for him to write more. Or maybe I'll re-listen to The Story of Human Language, too.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful