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Bryan

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  • Chasing the Scream

  • The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs
  • By: Johann Hari
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 14 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,618
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,373
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,373

It is now 100 years since drugs were first banned in the United States. On the eve of this centenary, journalist Johann Hari set off on an epic three-year, 30,000-mile journey into the war on drugs. What he found is that more and more people all over the world have begun to recognize three startling truths: Drugs are not what we think they are. Addiction is not what we think it is. And the drug war has very different motives to the ones we have seen on our TV screens for so long.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • This is worth your time....

  • By Drake on 04-24-16

Fantastic and balanced look at the war on drugs

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-14-16

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would. It's a phenomenal view of the history of the drug war that brings us to present day policy. You'll never view the war on drugs the same way again.

  • The Three Laws of Performance

  • : Rewriting the Future of Your Organization and Your Life
  • By: Steve Zaffron, Dave Logan
  • Narrated by: Walter Dixon
  • Length: 6 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 421
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 293
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 286

Our future is written by hopes, fears, dreams, expectations, and decisions made about life. In the same way, organizations have futures written by history, circumstances, culture, aspirations, successes, and failures. These already-written futures determine and shape the level of performance that's possible for individuals and organizations. Authors Steve Zaffron and Dave Logan crack the code on rewriting the future for people and organizations, elevating performance to unprecedented levels.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Clarity, Peace of Mind & Actionable work,

  • By John on 04-06-09

Self-help disguised as ...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-17-16

Would you try another book from Steve Zaffron and Dave Logan and/or Walter Dixon?

No.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

The performance was pretty good. Tough when you're given this type of material though.

Any additional comments?

I always have a hard time when someone touts the "3 Laws" or "10 behaviors", etc. that will lead to everlasting success. As if everything can be boiled down to a simple formula free of nuance. A previous review stated that they can't tell you what the three laws are. Honestly, I can't either! I made it through a quarter of this book and couldn't get myself to finish it and you'd think I could tell you what the first law is ... but I can't!I knew this would be a slog when the authors preface stated that the book is based on experiences, not studies. To give you some perspective, I tend to prefer books with relevant stories backed by data (think Dan Pink or Malcom Gladwell). This book has mediocre stories backed by no data.The advice is so cluttered with buzzwords and nonsense that it's almost unreadable (or listenable). If you like self-help books or Dr. Phil then you will probably love this book (not joking). Some people really eat this stuff up. It's just not for me.

  • The Phoenix Project

  • A Novel about IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win 5th Anniversary Edition
  • By: Gene Kim, Kevin Behr, George Spafford
  • Narrated by: Chris Ruen
  • Length: 14 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,170
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,350
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,337

Bill, an IT manager at Parts Unlimited, has been tasked with taking on a project critical to the future of the business, code named Phoenix Project. But the project is massively over budget and behind schedule. The CEO demands Bill must fix the mess in 90 days, or else Bill’s entire department will be outsourced. With the help of a prospective board member and his mysterious philosophy of the Three Ways, Bill starts to see that IT work has more in common with manufacturing plant work than he ever imagined.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theory and Practice merged

  • By Peter on 11-23-15

Great read if you work anywhere near software.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-15

Great way of illustrating the concepts and complexities of getting software into production. A must read for all IT and software executives.

  • Good Boss, Bad Boss

  • How to Be the Best... and Learn from the Worst
  • By: Robert I. Sutton
  • Narrated by: Bob Walter
  • Length: 7 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 250
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 170
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 167

Stanford Professor Robert Sutton weaves together the best psychological and management research with compelling stories and cases to reveal the mindset and moves of the best (and worst) bosses. This book was inspired by the deluge of emails, research, phone calls, and conversations that Dr. Sutton experienced after publishing his blockbuster best seller The No Asshole Rule. He realized that most of these stories and studies swirled around a central figure in every workplace: THE BOSS.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Most pragmatic management handbook

  • By Clint on 10-07-10

Best Leadership Book I've Ever Read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-27-15

Where does Good Boss, Bad Boss rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

When compared to other books on leadership or organizational behavior this one takes the top spot, hands down.

Most good books focus on a narrow aspect of leadership and provide concrete data to back up the assertion. "Good Boss, Bad Boss" covers almost everything I consider crucial to being a good leader. Too often we forget how much goes into being a "good boss". Unlike "The No Asshole Rule" (also a great read), "Good Boss, Bad Boss" covers such an array of behaviors and ways of viewing leadership that it should be standard reading for any "boss".

Have you listened to any of Bob Walter’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I feel like I've heard a Bob Walter's performance before, but I can't place where. Regardless, his reading of "Good Boss, Bad Boss" is fantastic. His performance makes the book come to life.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

When I heard the word "bosshole" I laughed out loud in my car. I'm glad I was in stop and go traffic because I had to pause the book to finish laughing.

Aside from the "bosshole" moment there are several moments I found myself laughing out loud. Robert Sutton's writing is very crisp, honest, and engaging. You'll find yourself laughing throughout this book. Robert Sutton's use of adjectives is priceless.

Any additional comments?

If you "manage" (I hate that word) or lead a team of individuals then this book should be mandatory reading. Period.