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J

Greenville, SC, United States
  • 16
  • reviews
  • 133
  • helpful votes
  • 65
  • ratings
  • Fight and Flight

  • Magic 2.0, Book 4
  • By: Scott Meyer
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 10 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 7,535
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,103
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 7,082

Martin and his friends discovered that their world is computer generated and that by altering the code they could alter reality. They traveled back in time to Medieval England to live as wizards. Almost everything they've done since then has, in one way or another, blown up in their faces. So of course they decide to make dragons. It does not go well.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Major stumble in a great series

  • By Virgil on 05-11-17

One star is generous

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-17

What happened to the great story?
After listening to the first two books in the series, I was sold, and bought the next two. "An Unwelcome Quest" was a disappointment, and "Fight And Flight" was even more so. I felt like the author started with a small idea and expanded it into a larger small idea. Too many things just didn't make sense, even in a fantasy setting. Meyer's humor has its place, and I fouind myself smiling occasionally throughout the listen, but the story needed more substance.
The only thing that kept me listening (other than the idea that I didn't want to totally waste a credit) was the narration of Luke Daniels. He has the characters down so well that it's easy to discern who's speaking... and his treatment of the Scottish warriors was over the top.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • An Unwelcome Quest

  • Magic 2.0, Book 3
  • By: Scott Meyer
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 11 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,876
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 13,812
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,798

Ever since Martin Banks and his fellow computer geeks discovered that reality is just a computer program to be happily hacked, they've been jaunting back and forth through time, posing as medieval wizards and having the epic adventures that other nerds can only dream of having. But even in their wildest fantasies, they never expected to end up at the mercy of the former apprentice whom they sent to prison for gross misuse of magic and all-around evil behavior.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I LIKED YOU TWO BETTER WHEN,

  • By Jim "The Impatient" on 12-24-15

Misses expectations

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-17

Bought this based on two previous books in the series. Seemed to be a case of the author "mailing it in." Weak plot, unnecessary repetition seemed to be there just to pad the story. Nevertheless, the performance was outstanding. Luke Daniels can do a dozen different voices and make them all unique.

  • Dead Mountain

  • The Untold True Story of the Dyatlov Pass Incident
  • By: Donnie Eichar
  • Narrated by: Donnie Eichar
  • Length: 6 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,289
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,109
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,108

In February 1959, a group of nine experienced hikers in the Russian Ural Mountains died mysteriously on an elevation known as Dead Mountain. Eerie aspects of the incident—unexplained violent injuries, signs that they cut open and fled the tent without proper clothing or shoes, a strange final photograph taken by one of the hikers, and elevated levels of radiation found on some of their clothes—have led to decades of speculation over what really happened.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Mystery & Intrigue In The Ural Mountains

  • By Sara on 06-30-15

Fascinating story!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-15

Donnie Eichar has written a very good book. A non-fiction book, it takes the reader step by step through solving one of most baffling mysteries of the twentieth century. I was very satisfied at the end of Eichar's conclusion. Even if it misses the mark, it is the most logical explanation.

It's been said that an author should never narrate his own writing. There are exceptions -- Garrison Keillor and Douglas Adams come to mind -- but this is not one of them. Eichar's delivery is monotonous, and most sentences end on a downbeat. Eichar is not a BAD reader -- just not a particularly good one.

  • 14

  • By: Peter Clines
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,815
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34,105
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 34,110

There are some odd things about Nate’s new apartment. Of course, he has other things on his mind. He hates his job. He has no money in the bank. No girlfriend. No plans for the future. So while his new home isn’t perfect, it’s livable. The rent is low, the property managers are friendly, and the odd little mysteries don’t nag at him too much. At least, not until he meets Mandy, his neighbor across the hall, and notices something unusual about her apartment. And Xela’s apartment. And Tim’s. And Veek’s.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Don't Get Killed By This Place

  • By Jim "The Impatient" on 06-20-13

Great ride!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-15

Very nice SF story - great plot building by the author; and absolutely outstanding job of narration. Porter handles all the voices with mastery. One of the best listens of the past year - highly recommended.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Reamde

  • By: Neal Stephenson
  • Narrated by: Malcolm Hillgartner
  • Length: 38 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,443
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,644
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6,685

Richard Forthrast created T’Rain, a multibillion-dollar, massively multiplayer online role-playing game. But T’Rain’s success has also made it a target. Hackers have struck gold by unleashing REAMDE, a virus that encrypts all of a player’s electronic files and holds them for ransom. They have also unwittingly triggered a deadly war beyond the boundaries of the game’s virtual universe - and Richard is at ground zero.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not perfect, but worth a listen.

  • By ShySusan on 10-01-11

Great narration, contrived story

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-14

I loved the concept of the story, and while I am not an online gamer, I am tech-savvy enough to spot the realism in the story of T'Rain and the REAMDE antagonist.
What brought the low rating was what appears to be poor plotting on the part of the author. A third of the way into the book, he introduces a new major character and spends much time explaining her background. Would have been much more effective weaving her story in from the beginning and merging her into the main plot at the appropriate time.
After that, the story just seemed to meander, looking for a direction and eventual denouement; the latter of which was obvious several listening hours in advance of it actually happening. Throw in some heroic deeds by the most unlikely of characters, and I was ready for it to end long before hearing, "... we hope you've enjoyed this program."
I did REALLY enjoy Hillgartner's narration, however, and would be happy to listen to his narration again soon.

  • Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

  • By: Jonathan Safran Foer
  • Narrated by: Jeff Woodman, Barbara Caruso, Richard Ferrone
  • Length: 10 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,543
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,551
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,565

Jonathan Safran Foer's best-selling debut novel, Everything Is Illuminated, wowed critics on its way to winning several literary prizes, including Book of the Year honors from the Los Angeles Times. It has been published in 24 countries and will soon be a major motion picture. Foer's talent continues to shine in this sometimes hilarious and always heartfelt follow-up.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Hard book to review

  • By Jbug on 12-27-09

Mostly a very enjoyable listen.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-14

I really liked the core story of the book, and Jeff Woodman is one of most talented narrators in the business. We follow the story of Oskar Shell on his journey, and it is riveting. Not so much is the story of his grandparents. While I am sure that, taken by itself, it is entertaining to some, in this reviewer's opinion, it was more of a distraction than anything else. There is a connecting thread, but it is weak at its strongest point.

  • The Martian

  • By: Andy Weir
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 10 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 151,935
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 140,196
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 140,053

Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars. Now, he's sure he'll be the first person to die there. After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth that he's alive - and even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone long before a rescue could arrive. Chances are, though, he won't have time to starve to death. The damaged machinery, unforgiving environment, or plainold "human error" are much more likely to kill him first.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • LOOK BOOBIES

  • By Jim "The Impatient" on 07-07-14

One of the best.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-14

Where does The Martian rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Very near the top. Suspenseful, exciting, believable story, wonderfully narrated. Caught myself in parking lots several times waiting for a break so I could exit my vehicle.

What did you like best about this story?

The fact that the author obviously did a LOT of research about the plausibility of this work of fiction, and left the educated reader with a feeling that this could have happened as described.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The ending was powerful and emotional. There were other moments that brought an unbidden fist pump from me.

Any additional comments?

I don't write a lot of reviews. This deserved one. The top of my list (after a couple hundred audiobooks) includes The Help, Water for Elephants, the Axis of Time series and this one. I will definitely give it another listen soon. If you're reading this review, just stop and spend the credit. You won't regret it.

  • The Bees

  • A Novel
  • By: Laline Paull
  • Narrated by: Orlagh Cassidy
  • Length: 10 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,242
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,125
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,123

Flora 717 is a sanitation worker, a member of the lowest caste in her orchard hive, where work and sacrifice are the highest virtues and worship of the beloved Queen the only religion. But Flora is not like other bees. With circumstances threatening the hive's survival, her curiosity is regarded as a dangerous flaw, but her courage and strength are assets. She is allowed to feed the newborns in the royal nursery and then to become a forager, flying alone and free to collect nectar and pollen.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My Favorite Book of 2014

  • By Emily - Audible on 12-07-14

Meh.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-14

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

If it had more drama or been less predictable. I listened to it twice but not intentionally... My mind kept wandering to other, more interesting things (like watching a fly crawl up a wall) and I would have to rewind a bit and listen again

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The narrator chose the same voice for different bees, and sometimes it was hard to discern who was speaking. One time she used a unique voice for the main character (Fl;ora 717) and didn't go back and edit a change. Unthinkable.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

Not so much. It wasn't horrible, it just tried too hard to force normal bee activity into human attributes and feelings, and it didn't work. It seemed to be well researched... as the offspring of a beekeeper, I recognized many of the activities described, but it just proved that though they may sound interesting, to live them as a bee is pretty boring.

Any additional comments?

To compare this to Watership Down is an insult to Richard Adams and the legion of fans who treasure that work. This wasn't even a shadow of that.

15 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • Rally Cry

  • The Lost Regiment, Book 1
  • By: William R. Forstchen
  • Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor
  • Length: 15 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 585
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 384
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 385

When Union Colonel Andrew Keane led his blue-coated soldiers aboard the transport ship, he could not have foreseen that their next port of call would be neither in the North nor the South, but on an alternate world where no human was free. Storm-swept through a space-time warp, Keane's regiment was shipwrecked in an alien land, a land where all that stood between them and destruction was the power of rifles over swords, spears, and crossbows.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • try Turtledove

  • By Jim "The Impatient" on 03-31-12

Good story, some reservations

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-26-10

This is a new series to me (though I've read Forstchen's "One Second After" and recommend it to anyone and everyone) -- and it was an entertaining listen.


As several other reviewers mentioned, the author's choice of adverbs is a bit limited and repetitious. If it had been written in software that has a word search, one could eliminate abut 75% of the uses of "evenly" and not lose a thing.


There are some other "oops" moments, as well, as Forstchen seems to forget occasionally that the protagonist has but one arm, and would have a bit of trouble leading a charge on horseback while brandishing a sabre or firing a weapon. There are several instances in which characters of different cultures and different languages have no trouble conversing without an interpreter... But the striking omission to me is the lack of attention to the feelings of the regiment over losing the link to ALL their loved ones in the "tunnel of light" event. The author devotes just a couple of paragraphs to this, which would have an overwhelming effect on everyone in the regiment.


Despite all that, Forstchen really knows how to write battle scenes, and keep them exciting and engaging. Lawlor's narration is fine once you get used to him, and I liked the listening experience well enough to order the next one in the series.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Earth Abides

  • The 60th Anniversary Edition
  • By: George R. Stewart
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis, Connie Willis
  • Length: 15 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,567
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,931
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,949

A disease of unparalleled destructive force has sprung up almost simultaneously in every corner of the globe, all but destroying the human race. One survivor, strangely immune to the effects of the epidemic, ventures forward to experience a world without man. What he ultimately discovers will prove far more astonishing than anything he'd either dreaded or hoped for.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, beautiful, sad, terrifying

  • By J. Rhoderick on 04-05-10

Not timeless

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-28-09

Maybe 60 years ago, this was a good book. In 2009, it's not a good listen.
Great start, but the protagonist turns out to be lazy and a bit stupid. The author gets us through the first few months after the Apocalypse, then skips through years, with the only description being the "naming" of each year. What? How about schooling the young? How about trying to rebuild civilization? How about making a effort to improve the situation? In thirty years of time, they never got around to building the pump house to give them running water.
The most difficult part is that the reader has no one to identify with or like throughout the entire book. I listened out of obligation to the purchase, but wouldn't recommend this "classic" to anyone I respect.

9 of 25 people found this review helpful