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Michael

  • 6
  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 10
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  • How to Be an Imperfectionist: The New Way to Self-Acceptance, Fearless Living, and Freedom from Perfectionism

  • By: Stephen Guise
  • Narrated by: Daniel Penz
  • Length: 5 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 263
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 235
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 229

Perfectionism is a naturally limiting mindset. For example, kids are taught to color inside the lines, and any color outside the lines is considered a mistake that must be corrected. Imperfectionism frees us to live outside the lines, where possibilities are infinite, mistakes are allowed, and self-judgment is minimal.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Please read 8,100,352 times

  • By Sandra Makuch on 10-16-16

Awesome book - must read/listen for those with perfectionist tendencies / problem

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-18

This book is really awesome - I learned a ton and started applying the principles immediately, which already helped (this is a must if you are an entrepreneur with perfectionist tendencies). The book is well organized and has clear implementation / application steps and guide - already recommended to a ton of friends with the problem.

  • Summary of Adam M. Grant's Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success

  • By: Ant Hive Media
  • Narrated by: Ashley Nero
  • Length: 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 16

For generations, we have focused on the individual drivers of success: passion, hard work, talent, and luck. But today, success is increasingly dependent on how we interact with others. It turns out that at work, most people operate as either takers, matchers, or givers. Whereas takers strive to get as much as possible from others and matchers aim to trade evenly, givers are the rare breed of people who contribute to others without expecting anything in return.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • ok, but too short

  • By Michael on 04-11-17

ok, but too short

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-11-17

ok but too short for a decent book summary. (not sure why audible requires a review to be at least 20 words so typing more :)

  • Summary of Steven R. Covey's The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change

  • By: Ant Hive Media
  • Narrated by: Don Hoeksema
  • Length: 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 32
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 28

Considered one of the most inspiring books ever written, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People has guided generations of readers for the last 25 years. Presidents and CEOs have kept it by their bedsides, students have underlined and studied passages from it, educators and parents have drawn inspiration from it, and individuals of all ages and occupations have used its step-by-step pathway to adapt to change and to take advantage of the opportunities that change creates.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • better than nothing, short, poor structure

  • By Michael on 04-09-17

better than nothing, short, poor structure

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-09-17

this is better than nothing but felt like it is too short. one of most frustrating parts is random lists that start with like #5 or #8.. example: was listening to book material than he randomly says #5 (as #5 in a list of things, not a chapter); however #1-4 were never mentioned - I relistened those areas 3 times and still did not find the missing points... other than that it's okay summary, wish it was a bit deeper (what is needed is a 40 page summary of 400 page book, not 3 page summary..)

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Zen to Done

  • The Ultimate Simple Productivity System
  • By: Leo Babauta
  • Narrated by: Fred Stella
  • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 293
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 241
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 236

Zen To Done (ZTD) is a system that is at once simple, and powerful, and will help you develop the habits that keep all of your tasks and projects organized, that keep your workday simple and structured, that keep your desk and email inbox clean and clear, and that keep you doing what you need to do, without distractions. This book was written for those who want to get their lives organized and actually execute the things on their to-do list by changing existing habits.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The simplest and right version of GTD. Recommended

  • By Miroslaw on 11-08-11

great for improving upon GTD, but read Allen first

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-20-17

material is great, but you will be able to better understand it after reading (or at least getting very familiar with David a
Allen's GTD). it does address some of the key concerns i had with regular GTD and makes it a bit simpler to implement. the key important thing missing in ZTD from GTD is the "next action" concept I found very useful in GTD

  • Sprint

  • How to Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days
  • By: Jake Knapp, John Zeratsky, Braden Kowitz
  • Narrated by: Dan Bittner
  • Length: 6 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,021
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 882
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 876

The companies that Google Ventures invest in face big questions every day: Where's the most important place to focus your effort, and how do you start? What will your ideas look like in real life? How many meetings and discussions does it take before you can be sure you have the right solution to a problem? Business owners and investors want their companies and the people who lead them to be equipped to answer these questions - and quickly.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Advice, But It's All Old News

  • By Michael on 08-19-16

great book, a bit too dense for audio sometimes

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-28-17

great book overall. can be a bit too dense for audio. take lots of notes

  • To Sell Is Human

  • The Surprising Truth about Moving Others
  • By: Daniel H. Pink
  • Narrated by: Daniel H. Pink
  • Length: 6 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,185
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,859
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,851

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, one in nine Americans works in sales. Every day more than 15 million people earn their keep by persuading someone else to make a purchase. But dig deeper and a startling truth emerges: Yes, one in nine Americans works in sales. But so do the other eight. Whether we’re employees pitching colleagues on a new idea, entrepreneurs enticing funders to invest, or parents and teachers cajoling children to study, we spend our days trying to move others.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great content, perhaps better in print

  • By Cari Rich on 07-26-15

so so - useful, but difficult to follow on audio

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-16

I liked the author's talks on motivation and have lots of respect, and was really excited to listen to this book, but honestly was disappointed.
Concepts seem to be useful, but they are given unnecessarily fancy sounding names, which could easily be renamed to smth simpler and more memorable.
Poor structure of book - jumping back and forth to loosely related and poorly named concepts usually without good connected progression, which ultimately can create a "soup" in listeners / readers head.
Difficult to follow, especially on audio when author constantly gives numbered lists (which I actually like), but you only know its a numbered list when he says 3 or 4 (it was not clear some list is upcoming) - if you are taking notes it gets very confusing and you waste time relistening..
I like scientific books, but this one has too much emphasis on proceas / methodology where in many cases what reader wants to know is the key result / findings.