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Steve

Delray Beach, FL, United States
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  • 148
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  • 171
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  • Hell Divers

  • The Hell Divers Series, Book 1
  • By: Nicholas Sansbury Smith
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 10 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,061
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,367
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 10,329

More than two centuries after World War III poisoned the planet, the final bastion of humanity lives on massive airships circling the globe in search of a habitable area to call home. Aging and outdated, most of the ships plummeted back to Earth long ago. The only thing keeping the two surviving lifeboats in the sky are Hell Divers - men and women who risk their lives by diving to the surface to scavenge for parts the ships desperately need.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thrilling and awesome

  • By Amazon Customer on 10-10-17

Not For Deep Thinkers

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-04-18

This book is at best the same predictable scenario repeated over and over: "The _______ is/are getting closer and closer". Insert in the blank, monsters, storm, more monsters, another storm, radiation, cancer, another storm and then of course more monsters. In all instances add the additional insight: "We're out of time!!! We're not going to make it!!!". But then make it out ok - most of the time. It got to where I quit caring and started talking back to the book. Then it got interesting and I made it through..
This might make a good drinking game. Listen to this book as a group and whoever can shout out the next line first doesn't have to drink but then everyone else does. I think I could stay pretty sober. This book is not deep thinking by any means. Who are the monsters? How did they get that way. You'll never know because, "We're out of time!!!".

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Patriarch

  • The Remarkable Life and Turbulent Times of Joseph P. Kennedy
  • By: David Nasaw
  • Narrated by: Malcolm Hillgartner
  • Length: 31 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 455
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 397
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 391

Joseph Patrick Kennedy - whose life spanned the First World War, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression, the Second World War, and the Cold War - was the patriarch of America’s greatest political dynasty. The father of President John F. Kennedy and Senators Robert and Edward Kennedy, 'Joe' Kennedy was an indomitable and elusive figure whose dreams of advancement for his nine children were matched only by his extraordinary personal ambition and shrewd financial skills.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderfully entertaining and engaging

  • By Robert on 03-29-13

Too clean. Too long. Distracting narration.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-29-18

Kennedy used blunt and colorful language but you won't hear any of it in this book. I was very disappointed - I wanted to know who this man was. Instead I heard a cleaned up version of Joe Kennedy and his family. The fact that the family paid for this book to be written is admitted in the book's prologue. So don't expect anything too revealing.
Badly in need of editing. Way too many communications, letters and newspaper articles that should have been reduced in number and summarized. 31 hours is 10 hours too long.
The narrator's attempt at accents fails throughout. Comically at times.

  • Bolivar

  • American Liberator
  • By: Marie Arana
  • Narrated by: David Crommett
  • Length: 20 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 455
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 406
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 410

It is astonishing that Simón Bolívar, the great Liberator of South America, is not better known in the United States. He freed six countries from Spanish rule, traveled more than 75,000 miles on horseback to do so, and became the greatest figure in Latin American history. His life is epic, heroic, straight out of Hollywood: he fought battle after battle in punishing terrain, forged uncertain coalitions of competing forces and races, lost his beautiful wife soon after they married and died relatively young, uncertain whether his achievements would endure.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • There will be blood.

  • By Alfredo on 08-02-13

A Bloodbath Of Racial Hatred

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-28-17

He may only have been the necessary evil needed to counter the evil oppressors. The story presented devolves simply into a lifetime of one racially motivated massacre after another. Mindless violence, unconnected to any cause other than that of total annihilation. By the end, Bolivar's vision for an American Liberation becomes only a footnote to all the carnage. He may have originally had good and pure intentions as a young man, but his final legacy is finally only that of extreme violence and vanity. Not the George Washington I know.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Season of the Witch

  • Enchantment, Terror, and Deliverance in the City of Love
  • By: David Talbot
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 17 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 625
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 543
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 544

Season of the Witch is the first book to fully capture the dark magic of San Francisco in this breathtaking period, when the city radically changed itself - and then revolutionized the world. The cool gray city of love was the epicenter of the 1960s cultural revolution. But by the early 1970s, San Francisco’s ecstatic experiment came crashing down from its starry heights. The city was rocked by savage murder sprees, mysterious terror campaigns, political assassinations, street riots, and finally a terrifying sexual epidemic.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Great Book...

  • By Douglas on 07-29-13

Northern CA Is A Little Bit Creepy.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-30-17

I've lived in northern California, in Stockton and the Bay Area. There is an under-current of violence there that I've that always felt but couldn't understand. This book helps to identify why I've felt that way. It is physically one of most beautiful places on earth but it is a land of political extremes with extreme actors who've been swept up by the politics and have done some very very bad things. The book left me saddened that for all the gains we've had there they had to come at the expense of so many great losses. The violent under-current gives the beauty a hard edge still today. Nirvana comes at a cost.

  • Assholes

  • A Theory
  • By: Aaron James
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 6 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 153
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 132
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 132

What does it mean for someone to be an asshole? The answer is not obvious, despite the fact that we are often personally stuck dealing with people for whom there is no better name. Try as we might to avoid them, assholes are found everywhere - at work, at home, on the road, and in the public sphere. Encountering one causes great difficulty and personal strain, especially because we often cannot understand why exactly someone should be acting like that.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not sure what I expected…

  • By Kirsten on 11-13-12

A Too Studious Examination

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-17

If you're going to use the word 'Assholes' in the title then a little levity might be expected in the book. But instead, this is a very serious examination, if you will, of people with difficult personalities, (i.e. assholes). If you're open to the title then you're likely open to a little joke here and there but be forewarned, there are very few. I don't think it was good judgement to use the word asshole every paragraph of such and academic discussion. Such a dry examination using such a lighthearted word was off kilter.

  • The Greater Journey

  • Americans in Paris
  • By: David McCullough
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 16 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,157
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,730
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,730

The Greater Journey is the enthralling, inspiring—and until now, untold—story of the adventurous American artists, writers, doctors, politicians, architects, and others of high aspiration who set off for Paris in the years between 1830 and 1900, ambitious to excel in their work.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • McCullough takes it to the next level

  • By gregory m loyd on 07-12-11

Want To Understand America? Go To Paris.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-27-16

I was amazed at how much Paris has affected so many of our greatest Americans. Our nation, so raw and new in the 1800's had nothing like a Paris to draw such inspiration from. America at that time had no libraries or museums or great universities. At that time if you wanted to be the best at what did you had to go to Paris to learn how to do it. Fortunately for us, Paris was there to fire and inspire our best and brightest and they came back to America and became American Masters.
David McCullough immerses you in the Parisian experience and leaves you wanting to buy the next ticket to get to the city. Edward Herrmann is, as always, impeccable.

  • John Adams

  • By: David McCullough
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,459
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 516
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 512

With the sweep and vitality of a great novel, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David McCullough presents the enthralling story of John Adams. This is history on a grand scale - an audiobook about politics, war, and social issues, but also about human nature, love, religious faith, virtue, ambition, friendship and betrayal, and the far-reaching consequences of noble ideas. Read by History Channel host Edward Herrmann!

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • fantastic

  • By Thomas on 07-06-06

The True Architect Of Our American Experiment.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-06-16

I finished this book with a new and greater appreciation not only for John Adams but for the reaffirmation that our country was not founded on the actions a few uneducated rebels but by the persuasive powers of several well educated idealists. That our origins are based on logic and reason and respect for human history and dignity. That the most persuasive of those idealists was John Adams. This book is a great experience to read. Having just endured another presidential election in 2016 reading this book is a tremendous reassurance from the past from America's greatest architect. Thank you, David McCullough and thank you, Edward Herrman. This book is a gem.

  • The Boys in the Boat

  • Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
  • By: Daniel James Brown
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 14 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 24,183
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 21,976
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 21,927

Daniel James Brown's robust book tells the story of the University of Washington's 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Do you believe in miracles??

  • By Janice on 07-12-13

The Human Spirit Celebrated.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-22-16

This read is a reaffirming insight into what was and still is good and true about being human. A very satisfying listen. Highly recommended. If you liked 'Unbroken' or 'Seabiscuit' this book will move you the same way.

  • Saturn Run

  • By: John Sandford Ctein
  • Narrated by: Eric Conger
  • Length: 16 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,178
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,022
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,013

The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope - something is approaching Saturn and decelerating. Space objects don't decelerate. Spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: Whatever built that ship is at least one hundred years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Best Sci-Fi Book in a While!

  • By Ted on 05-29-17

Virgil Flowers Goes To Saturn

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-08-16

A decent story about going to Saturn in our near future. It's plausible mostly in theory today but the science should be doable by 2066 and its well explained. But maybe a little too well explained. The science and the what if's go on a bit too long for me but the story makes up for long expositions by the end.
John Sanford is the master of dialogue and character. Always fun. The main character is again an Alpha male. Very Virgil Flowers, but that's ok, I like Virgil. But I wonder if Sanford would ever write an Alpha female hero? Just sayin. A fun ride.

  • A Man Called Ove

  • By: Fredrik Backman
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 9 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 57,285
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52,398
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52,301

Meet Ove. He's a curmudgeon - the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him "the bitter neighbor from hell". But behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I Laughed and I Cried

  • By Bill on 08-22-15

An Insult To Middle Age

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-23-16

The author, Fredrik Backman, has a very low estimation of the middle aged mind. I'm fifty nine. The character, Ove, is younger than I am but he is written as if he's got a the reduced mental process akin to a ninety year old. I looked up the author and was not surprised to learn he was born in 1981.
The narrative requires you to go along with the author's flawed perspective. It's very repetitive and simplistic and was not at all tolerable. I lost interest very quickly. I suppose there might some emotional reveal later in the story that explains the simplicity but I couldn't abide the wait. Or the insult.