LISTENER

Elaine

  • 35
  • reviews
  • 73
  • helpful votes
  • 70
  • ratings
  • The Music Shop

  • A Novel
  • By: Rachel Joyce
  • Narrated by: Steven Hartley
  • Length: 8 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 512
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 486
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 484

It is 1988. On a dead-end street in a run-down suburb there is a music shop that stands small and brightly lit, jam-packed with records of every kind. Like a beacon, the shop attracts the lonely, the sleepless, and the adrift; Frank, the shop's owner, has a way of connecting his customers with just the piece of music they need. Then, one day, into his shop comes a beautiful young woman, Ilse Brauchmann, who asks Frank to teach her about music.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another thing of beauty from Rachel Joyce

  • By Emily - Audible on 01-11-18

Great Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-18

If you want to read a book that is fun and very entertaining spend the credit. You will regret it. It is a credit well spent.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Black Count

  • Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo
  • By: Tom Reiss
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 13 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 894
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 800
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 806

Father of the novelist Alexandre Dumas, Alex Dumas has become, through his son's books, the model for a captivating modern protagonist: The wronged man in search of justice. Born to a black slave mother and a fugitive white French nobleman in Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti), Alex Dumas was briefly sold into bondage but then made his way to Paris where he was schooled as a sword-fighting member of the French aristocracy. He was only 32 when he was given command of 53,000 men, the reward for series of triumphs that many regarded as impossible, and then topped his previous feats by leading a raid up a frozen cliff face....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Truth more unbelivable than fiction

  • By Jean on 01-27-13

Thanks to Tom Reiss

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-14-17

Without Mr Reiss's research, thus writing this book we would have never known of this amazing person, Alexander Dumas. A truly gallant human being and hero. At the same time Reiss gives a concise history of the French Revolution.

I had no idea when I purchase this book would enjoy it as much as I did. I plan on listening to "The Black Court" again, probably twice.

Anyone who enjoys history should have this book in their library along with the "Count of Monte Cristo"

  • WWW

  • Wake
  • By: Robert J. Sawyer
  • Narrated by: Jessica Almasy, Jennifer Van Dyck, A. C. Fellner, and others
  • Length: 12 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,233
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,455
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,456

Caitlin Decter is young, pretty, feisty, a genius at math - and blind. Still, she can surf the net with the best of them, following its complex paths clearly in her mind. But Caitlin's brain long ago co-opted her primary visual cortex to help her navigate online. So when she receives an implant to restore her sight, instead of seeing reality, the landscape of the World Wide Web explodes into her consciousness, spreading out all around her in a riot of colors and shapes.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Great, if Incomplete, Concept

  • By Seth H. Wilson on 04-14-09

Wake is Wonderful. Looking forward to Watch

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-14

Robert Sawyers science fiction books are always wonderful to read. The books are well researched. informative, and diverse. He approaches subjects I do not find in other science fiction. www.Wake is true to his style. I was engrossed from the beginning to the end. One issue I had with the book,it left some things hanging at the end, and I wanted to hear "the rest of the story". If I had not known that Wake was the first part of a trilogy I would have given it 4 star. I could not find the explanation on the Kindle version so I gave it 4 stars. Otherwise it would have been 5.

Sawyer's book "Calculating God" is one of my favorite science fiction of all time. Wake and this series may come in a close second. The story is engrossing, the characters and description of events are amazing. I could "see" every thing in detail. My favorite character is "the web" or "Phantom" and the way Sawyer brought "Phantom" to life. When "Phantom" was first introduced I was not sure where it was going, but it became very clear quickly. There was one point where the ooooxxxx etc. was a little long to listen to. I have a short attention span at times. Reading that part on Kindle I would skim and when listening I would up the speed. I am looking forward to reading more from "Web Mind" aka "Phantom" in books 2 and 3.

I applaud Audible for having multiple narrators preform the narration. This gave each characters it's own personality and made the listening more enjoyable.

On to Watch and Wonder.

  • The Alchemy of Air

  • A Jewish Genius, a Doomed Tycoon, and the Scientific Discovery That Fed the World but Fueled the Rise of Hitler
  • By: Thomas Hager
  • Narrated by: Adam Verner
  • Length: 10 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,021
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 859
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 857

At the dawn of the 20th century, humanity was facing global disaster. Mass starvation, long predicted for the fast-growing population, was about to become a reality. A call went out to the worlds scientists to find a solution. This is the story of the two enormously gifted, fatally flawed men who found it: the brilliant, self-important Fritz Haber and the reclusive, alcoholic Carl Bosch. Together they discovered a way to make bread out of air, built city-sized factories, controlled world markets, and saved millions of lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Riveting

  • By sarah on 07-31-11

Avert one global disaster/cause another

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-13-14

II can not say anything more about this book than has already been said in previous reviews. It is definitely "Rifting" and an important piece of work. Fritz Habor and Carl Bosch changed the world forever. For the good, the bad, and even worse. Because of them we skirted one global disaster but their invention and work has created another global disaster. It is now our problem to solve, if it can be solved.

Most of the people in the world are alive today and have plenty to eat because of them. That is the good news. The world has now become over populated It will continue to get worse. There is no turning back the clock nor is there anyway way to change the course we are on. That is the bad news. The Habor/Bosch plants are a major contributor, not only to our population problem, but also the "Global Warming" issue. That is the "worse" news.

Haber and Bosch were geniuses and they both paid the price in their personal, as well as professionals, life's. We have them to thank for our "Horn of Plenty". Unfortunately it was not controlled or managed. I do not think anyone could have had the foresight to imagine where their inventions and work would lead. Even it they did they probably would not have been able to do anything to change where it has lead us.

I want to thank the author for taking the time to do the thorough research it took to write this book. It is a gift to all of us. Also, if it weren't for Audible I do not think I would have known about or bought this book.

  • The Homesman

  • A Novel
  • By: Glendon Swarthout
  • Narrated by: Candace Thaxton
  • Length: 7 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 252
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 228
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 233

Soon to be a major motion picture directed by Tommy Lee Jones, The Homesman is a devastating story of early pioneers in 1850s American West. It celebrates the ones we hear nothing of: the brave women whose hearts and minds were broken by a life of bitter hardship. A "homesman" must be found to escort a handful of them back East to a sanitarium. When none of the county’s men steps up, the job falls to Mary Bee Cuddy - ex-teacher, spinster, indomitable and resourceful.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Great story but the end was a huge diappointment

  • By C. Oneal on 03-04-14

Part of the Wild West you never hear about

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-12-14

This book is one of my favorites so far this year. The story shows the tremendous hardships women experienced when pioneering West. Some crumbled under the pressure. This is a story of what happened to some of them that could not endure and lost their minds. Something I never thought happening or found mentioned in other stories about the West. It really opened my eyes on just how difficult it was to be a woman in the West during that period of history. It is exciting, heartbreaking, and even humorous at times. I was engrossed from beginning to the end.

I read both the positive reviews along with the negative. Some of the negative reviews focused on the stories ending and almost stopped me from buying. When reading reviews I read the good and bad, not so bad, and ugly. Then balance them the best I can, considering my own taste. I decided to purchase this book with the expectation of a poor ending. I became so engrossed in the book by the end I forgot about the negative reviews. The ending had some unexpected surprises but was probably the way things actually would have happened. After thinking back I realized the author gave us a few clues about some of the events at the end. I was completely satisfied.

I found the narration slightly distracting. It was the "sing/song" type and the narrator tried to put more emotion into the reading than is necessary. I got past that by speeding it up, which I do not like to do. In this case it helped. I found this story so good I will go back at listen to this again later this year and try and leave it the on normal speed.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • A Town Like Alice

  • By: Nevil Shute
  • Narrated by: Robin Bailey
  • Length: 10 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,754
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,104
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,114

Jean Paget is just twenty years old and working in Malaya when the Japanese invasion begins. When she is captured she joins a group of other European women and children whom the Japanese force to march for miles through the jungle. While on the march, the group run into some Australian prisoners, one of whom, Joe Harman, helps them steal some food, and is horrifically punished by the Japanese as a result.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful story, beautifully told

  • By Mary on 03-27-11

A "Norman Rockwell" like book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-14

If Norman Rockwell was an author his books for read like this one. The story and narration of this book gave me the same feeling I have when looking at a Norman Rockwell painting. Full of very pleasant emotion and totally engrossing. My eyes do not want to leave a Norman Rockwell painting and I did not want to stop listening to this book.

The story starts in England in the thirties with an "Esquire" who is requested to meet a reclusive man who is content with his life. The Esquire draws a will and trust for him. When the man dies, many years later, the Esquire must then find the beneficiaries. After doing so, the story takes you to Malaysia during WWII and the Japanese occupation. After the war and in the 50s, it goes to the "Outback Country" of Australia, an the life of "Ringers". I learned about life at that period of history in a different part of the world. All the individuals are interesting and truly pleasant. With one not so pleasant individual. The book was just the right length. I felt very satisfied when it finished. Like eating good meal without over eating.

It is an easy book with excellent narration. The narrations is so good I much rather listen to, than read, this book. It will stay with me a long time, As Rockwell's painting do.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Goldfinch

  • By: Donna Tartt
  • Narrated by: David Pittu
  • Length: 32 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,593
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,403
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 21,425

The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present-day America and a drama of enthralling force and acuity. It begins with a boy. Theo Decker, a 13-year-old New Yorker, miraculously survives an accident that kills his mother. Abandoned by his father, Theo is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. Bewildered by his strange new home on Park Avenue, disturbed by schoolmates who don't know how to talk to him, and tormented above all by his unbearable longing for his mother, he clings to one thing that reminds him of her: a small, mysteriously captivating painting that ultimately draws Theo into the underworld of art.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Boy, am I in the minority on this one.

  • By Bonny on 11-04-13

The title is very misleading

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-18-13

The story started off well and caught my interest right from the beginning. Unfortunately that did not last long. I should have returned the book. The story focused so much on drug and alcohol abuse it became boring quickly. I ended up fast forwarding at the speed of 2 and sometimes 2.5 to find out what happened to the painting, which was the only part of the story that was of interest, and turned out to be a very small part. All of the characters were so flawed I could cared less what happened to them, most of all the main character.

Tartt's descriptions of the main character's use of drugs was good, but more information than I was interested in hearing.

The plot would have been much better if Tratt followed the painting rather than main character and his drugged up life and messed up friends.

Pittu narration was good considering the material he was presenting.

20 of 28 people found this review helpful

  • The Book Thief

  • By: Markus Zusak
  • Narrated by: Allan Corduner
  • Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,994
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,116
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,158

It's just a small story really, about, among other things, a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak's groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can't resist: books.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Glad I took a chance.

  • By Robert on 08-20-11

Through the watchful eyes of Death

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-16-13

What a fascinating way to tell a story of how souls are picked up after the body has died. The spirit of Death follows a girl around in Germany during WW II picking up souls of people that have died around her, starting with her little brother. It is wonderful and thought provoking from beginning to the end.

  • Benediction

  • By: Kent Haruf
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 8 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 253
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 231
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 231

From the beloved and best-selling author of Plainsong and Eventide comes a story of life and death, and the ties that bind, once again set out on the High Plains in Holt, Colorado. When Dad Lewis is diagnosed with terminal cancer, he and his wife, Mary, must work together to make his final days as comfortable as possible. Their daughter, Lorraine, hastens back from Denver to help look after him....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another Home Run for Haruf & Bramhall

  • By Adele on 03-06-13

Depressing

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-16-13

I have a friend that highly recommended this book. I found it very depressing and sad.
I did not care for any of the characters. They all led very depressing and boring lives.
I only listen to the end trying to find out why my friend enjoy it. I never did

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Boys in the Boat

  • Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
  • By: Daniel James Brown
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 14 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 24,116
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 21,914
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 21,866

Daniel James Brown's robust book tells the story of the University of Washington's 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Do you believe in miracles??

  • By Janice on 07-12-13

Unbelievable but True

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-16-13

This book tells a true story about an unlikely group that came from behind with all odds against them only to pull off one of the greatest feats in the history of the US Olympics.