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The Call Audiobook

The Call

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Publisher's Summary

The Hunger Games meets horror in this unforgettable thriller where only one thing is certain...you will be Called.

Thousands of years ago, humans banished the Sidhe fairy race to another dimension. The beautiful, terrible Sidhe have stewed in a land of horrors ever since, plotting their revenge...and now their day has come.

Fourteen-year-old Nessa lives in a world where every teen will be "Called". It could come in the middle of the day, it could come deep in the night. But one instant she will be here, and the next she will wake up naked and alone in the Sidhe land. She will be spotted, hunted down, and brutally murdered. And she will be sent back in pieces by the Sidhe to the human world...unless she joins the rare few who survive for 24 hours and escape unscathed.

Nessa trains with her friends at an academy designed to maximize her chances at survival. But as the days tick by and her classmates go one by one, the threat of her Call lurks ever closer...and with it the threat of an even more insidious danger closer to home.

©2016 Peadar O'Guilin (P)2016 Scholastic Inc.

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.3 (264 )
5 star
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4 star
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3 star
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2 star
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1 star
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Overall
4.2 (256 )
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Story
4.5 (256 )
5 star
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4 star
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3 star
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2 star
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1 star
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Performance
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  •  
    Amy 09-03-16
    Amy 09-03-16 Member Since 2007

    Say something about yourself!

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Haunting, Harrowing, and Fantastic"

    If you're within the sound of my voice -- or, more appropriately, the sight of my written words -- please take this as a given: I want to sit you down, shove this book into your hands (or the audiobook into your ears), and insist that you enjoy it. Now.

    It may be easy to overlook what a stunning achievement this novel represents, but that's because Peadar Ó Guilín makes it seem so effortless as he draws the reader on from one page-turning moment to the next. It is a stunning achievement nonetheless, with its meditation on how a people's history returns to them for rectification; its all-too-relevant consideration of mass culture during its descent ("I don't care if I don't make it... I mean it. The country is done for, and we all know that's the truth. Aiofe is right. Even the survivors have nothing to look forward to except decline..."); its seamless world-building, folding real and mythic Irish history, language, and poetry into its storytelling ("Never has a generation of Irish children been so aware of its own folklore"); its related and stunning sense of place; and its utterly compelling depiction of a three-dimensional, dynamic, and partially (and permanently) disabled heroine.

    I don't sell young adult dystopias short, but I also feel confident in saying that The Call transcends the labels others would place on it. Both adult and YA readers of science fiction, fantasy will find much to appreciate here.

    The premise is this: Ireland is a nation cut off from the rest of the world, plagued by terrible retribution. Thousands of years after the Sidhe, the people of the mounds, the followers of the Goddess Danu, were displaced by the Irish and banished to a colorless netherworld, they have returned with a vengeance to destroy those who removed them. Every Irish child will face the three minutes of the Call during his or her adolescence. Few return alive, and most of those are twisted beyond recognition. Nessa, whose polio-twisted legs all but promise she will not outrun the Sidhe when her time comes, stubbornly prepares to meet the Call and win her survival.

    What I appreciate most -- and that's saying a lot, considering how much I love about this novel -- is the nuanced, insightful way The Call handles the question of, and challenges readers about, conquest and conflict. What are the causes and costs of war? How we determine who is responsible? What does it mean to be guilty/innocent or winning/losing?

    Take for instance this passage:

    "'Listen,' he says, 'we don't need the Sidhe to teach us evil. We were the ones who put them in the Grey Land, remember? And not just for a day or however long it is the Call lasts. We Irish... we trapped an entire race of people in hell for all eternity just so we could take their homes for ourselves. You can read it in The Book of Conquests. I mean, look at it from their point of view.... There they were, a few thousand years ago, living in a place they loved so much that they called it the Many-Colored Land. Then this other group arrives, pretty much the same as them, speaking the same language even, except this new lot -- our ancestors -- were the first in the world to have iron weapons. They thought it gave them the right to take everything! Everything!'"

    And this one:

    "'How long must I wait?' she asks the mirror in Sidhe.
    "As a survivor, she doesn't need to speak the language anymore. But many like her are more comfortable in it than English, and since they have no choice but to marry each other, the primary schools of the country are filling with tiny tots whose innocent mouths spout the long-dead language of their distant ancestors, which also happen to be the living, never-changing tongue of the enemy. Some day, she thinks, we will be them, a greater victory for the Sidhe than if they kill us all."

    Like all great speculative fiction, The Call provides us metaphors by which we can question our condition and examine current issues in our world today. It also provides a window into history, art, and our common humanity. And it does so while providing a chilling and fascinating ride.

    Amy Shiels' beautiful narration helps ground the text in its Irish context and bring the characters to life.

    13 of 13 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cheryl Etheredge 03-23-17 Member Since 2015
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    "Perfect Twisted Fairy Tale"

    Not as horror filled as some reviews would have one believe but definitely a dark story. However, it has plenty of hope, love, and charm to stop it from being a total downer. It's intelligent and raw fantasy at its best. Defiantly check it out if you're into grown up fairy tales where not every ending is happy. Also, please listen to the narrator audio sample, I personally loved the thick accent and thought it added much to the story but it might not be for everyone.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jennifer 09-14-16
    Jennifer 09-14-16 Member Since 2014

    Book-Addict

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "The Call Keeps You on the Edge of Your Seat!"
    Where does The Call rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    The Call is an interesting concept and I would not mind listening to it again. It has it's own twists and turns and builds its own world to be like none other that I have read about before.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    It is hard to pick a favorite character because you get to know so many of them that you even fall in love with the side characters. Each person has their own story and background and I could not help but love a bunch of the characters in this book.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    I do not have a favorite scene that would not give away the whole book but I do love the concept of how the characters in the book get Called and what they do in the Sidhe's world.


    Any additional comments?

    This book does have funny, violent, and terrifying moments that I found myself wanting to stay up to listen to it. It did keep me awake thinking about some of the scarier images that came to my mind with this book. I will still recommend it but it is part of a suspenseful and horror genre. I usually sway away from horror but the suspense and intrigue of the characters made me finish it and I have been in somewhat of a reading slump lately so this book got me back into reading, finally!

    All in all, it is a great book that I will be recommending to my friends.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Leslie Akins 04-03-17 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Desparate and Bleak"
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    I'm not certain anything could as it was the story itself that wasn't really for me. If I take my personal likes and dislikes out of the equation then I'd say the story was ok and written fairly well....the author definitely pulls the correct emotions from you.


    What do you think your next listen will be?

    Blood Rule: Dirty Blood Book 4 by Heather Hildenbrand.


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    Eh, ish ish. Not the worst narration I've ever heard. There were times it felt discordant and times where the monotone slow pace matched the bleak feeling of the book. The accent was pretty interesting'ish. The narrator did rush through certain characters speech but I actually felt it matched them...Just be prepared to really listen to the words to understand.


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Call?

    I would cut the repetitive descriptions. Honestly, I only need to hear why they call her The Turkey once.


    Any additional comments?

    This book wasn't for me even though there are many books that have the same desolate, empty, bleak feel to them as The Call that I absolutely loved. I believe it is the darker books based on Fae that I don't enjoy. So I'd say if you love all Fae books and are forgiving a bit in the narration then give it a go.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    morgan 01-05-17
    morgan 01-05-17 Member Since 2017
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    "Left me feeling empty!"

    I have never elder a review before but feel it is my duty as an avid reader and listener to share. This book.... wow. This book. It was horrifying, funny, disgusting, sad, surprising..... there are just no words to describe the experience it gave.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Janelle B. 03-03-17
    Janelle B. 03-03-17
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    "Bad"

    The Irish accent is hard to understand and the reader read it too fast. Too many characters. I forced myself thru it and it got more interesting near the end but the ending was blah. Left no answers on the future. Creative but dumb storyline. Bad.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Samantha Singer 04-25-17 Member Since 2011
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    "Amazing 😃🦄👍🏼"

    I loved this book and I think people who like Science-fiction books will love it too

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    s. hicks 04-14-17
    s. hicks 04-14-17 Member Since 2016
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    "Great story, amazingly acted storytelling for audio"

    This was a great and horrific story. No justice is done by comparing it to the Hunger Games because this is way better and in no way similar. I was captivated through the entire story. The only reason I give it a 4 is because it ended too soon and didn't feel complete. It did have an ending, but I felt that there could have been more to it. Definitely a must have audio book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Rachel 04-10-17
    Rachel 04-10-17 Member Since 2017
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    "Meh"

    The story was maybe a 4 star. But the ending was lacking. There wasn't much resolution and the whole plot stayed very superficial. It could have gone way deeper and been far more exciting and emotionally engaging. I was disappoint

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Krissy Jake 04-06-17
    Krissy Jake 04-06-17 Member Since 2016
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    "Great story!"

    I had no idea what to expect. I was pleasantly surprised! A very imaginative, creative and exciting journey. I loved the narrator as well! I hope this becomes a series. I have so many questions! I would love to know how the breaking of the treaty impacts everything, and if there is hope for the generations to come.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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