We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills Lecture

Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills

Regular Price:$34.95
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

No skill is more important in today's world than being able to think about, understand, and act on information in an effective and responsible way. What's more, at no point in human history have we had access to so much information, with such relative ease, as we do in the 21st century. But because misinformation out there has increased as well, critical thinking is more important than ever.

These 24 rewarding lectures equip you with the knowledge and techniques you need to become a savvier, sharper critical thinker in your professional and personal life. By immersing yourself in the science of cognitive biases and critical thinking, and by learning how to think about thinking (a practice known as metacognition), you'll gain concrete lessons for doing so more critically, more intelligently, and more successfully.

The key to successful critical thinking lies in understanding the neuroscience behind how our thinking works - and goes wrong; avoiding common pitfalls and errors in thinking, such as logical fallacies and biases; and knowing how to distinguish good science from pseudoscience. Professor Novella tackles these issues and more, exploring how the (often unfamiliar) ways in which our brains are hardwired can distract and prevent us from getting to the truth of a particular matter.

Along the way, he provides you with a critical toolbox that you can use to better assess the quality of information. Even though the world is becoming more and more saturated information, you can take the initiative and become better prepared to make sense of it all with this intriguing course.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2012 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2012 The Great Courses

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.4 (3198 )
5 star
 (1959)
4 star
 (810)
3 star
 (283)
2 star
 (90)
1 star
 (56)
Overall
4.3 (2762 )
5 star
 (1606)
4 star
 (717)
3 star
 (291)
2 star
 (87)
1 star
 (61)
Story
4.4 (2816 )
5 star
 (1714)
4 star
 (749)
3 star
 (255)
2 star
 (58)
1 star
 (40)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Patrick United States 01-21-14
    Patrick United States 01-21-14 Member Since 2015

    Greetings. My brother introduced me to Audible in 2011. Since, nothing but enjoyment. Hopefully my reviews are very useful to you. Enjoy!

    HELPFUL VOTES
    56
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    31
    23
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    4
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Educating your mind for our society."
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes I would. Very informative and exposes the listener to things going on that impact your life that you know nothing about and no way to offset it. It provides very useful info regarding nearly every aspect of your life. The narrator/professor speaks in layman term. Very pleasant to listen to.


    Have you listened to any of Professor Steven Novella’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    No


    11 of 15 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Lloyd SOUTHLAKE, TX, United States 09-06-13
    Lloyd SOUTHLAKE, TX, United States 09-06-13
    HELPFUL VOTES
    16
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    10
    7
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A great guide"
    What did you love best about Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills?

    IT covered a lot of ground and did so well.


    What does Professor Steven Novella bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    I do a lot of driving and it covered the topic without the need for visuals.


    6 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jatinder S Brar 07-12-14
    HELPFUL VOTES
    36
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Not for those looking to improve themselves"
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    Individuals looking for reaffirmation of their skepticism of, or those looking to walk out from the shadows of pseudo-science.


    What was most disappointing about The Great Courses’s story?

    There is no skill building here. The book lays out the world as the author (and for the most part the scientific community at large) sees it; but provides nothing for the reader that can be used to build on their existing critical skill set. An individual struggling to shake off belief in the existence of Bigfoot may find this book useful; but if you are a professional looking to add something to your toolkit with regards to your own critical thinking process, the author has nothing to offer you. Don't waste your time.


    36 of 51 people found this review helpful
  •  
    january Rock Hill, SC 01-23-14
    january Rock Hill, SC 01-23-14 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    693
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    141
    91
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    104
    6
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "I didn't like it...or did I?"

    I have listened to several lectures in this series and loved every one. Not so much this one, though. I keep rereading the title to see if it might give me some indication where I went wrong. But, no. That's no help.

    Going into the lecture, I was expecting Professor Novella to instruct us on ways to use the scientific method to think about things in a critical way. That's not what this lecture is about at all. Instead, it is about how to think critically about science.

    In the first two or three sessions he does touch on some practical uses of critical thinking, and then again in the final session. The rest of the time he spends talking about scientists who have made mistakes and people who believe in kooky ideas, like cult teachings.

    I initially chose this lecture over, say, Important Pharaohs of Egypt, because of something I recently heard on the news. The White House held a press conference to let people know that the government healthcare website was safe and had not been hacked. Normally I don't pay much attention to White House press conferences, but this one struck me because there was no news report before hand to indicate that the website was unsafe. This, therefore, led me to think that this was the result of a logical fallacy. Someone was poisoning the well. Someone who is opposed to government healthcare started a rumor, and people who weren't using their critical thinking skills spread it around, thus causing the White House to address a problem that did not exist.

    Because of this, I wanted to know more about how our brains work, and why people let themselves get carried away by things they haven't fully thought through. Not about the drudgery of scientific proof.

    There is one thing about this lecture that I did like, however. While I was sitting there listening, trying very hard to learn something new, I realized that my level of critical thinking is above normal. Learning by not learning. Hmm...

    I'm not saying this is a bad lecture. It will be very interesting to someone who has never heard this information before. It's very important to learn how to call BS when it needs to be called. But I didn't find this lecture helpful. Perhaps I am just to skeptical about everything already.

    34 of 50 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 02-21-15
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    7
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "lesser course"

    With a bit of research I feel I could have given just as good a course myself. It's terrible to listen to an author who doesn't follow his own advice, one who uses contradictory ideas to prove his own theories. I found myself arguing with this professor quite a lot because of not very well articulated references.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Irini 04-29-14
    Irini 04-29-14
    HELPFUL VOTES
    5
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Scientific thinking, not critical thinking"
    Was Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills worth the listening time?

    This course is not worth the time spent on it, since all the ideas from these lectures could be explained in one 30 minute lecture.
    Moreover, the course is not about critical thinking, the course is about how to think as a scientist.
    It remains a mystery for me why this course has such high rating on audible!


    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Euge Danbury, CT 02-14-14
    Euge Danbury, CT 02-14-14 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    19
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    62
    8
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Best comprehensive look at the mind."

    I'm a big fan of non-fiction books about the way our minds work, the way our logic works, etc... Books like "Thinking: Fast and Slow" are fascinating but at times can be overwhelming in their depth and length. This set of lectures is a concise yet all encompassing overview of the whole subject. It's got enough depth to sink your teeth into, without beating over the head with too many example, and it moves from subject to subject at a pace that keeps things interesting. You'll definitely want breaks to process some of the information, as listening to 5-6 lectures straight might make your eyes glaze over. But overall, this is the best of the great courses, in my opinion.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    mc2 Monument, CO, US 02-03-15
    mc2 Monument, CO, US 02-03-15 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    143
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    13
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    7
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Full of Contradictions"

    The Professor engages in a tour of how flawed your brain is and how you cannot trust your brain. He also offers examples to illustrate the point but I found several inane.

    For example, he a made a point to state that a pilot diverted his ship because of a UFO but turned out to be a Mylar balloon. Obviously he does not consider that the term UFO means "unidentified flying object" which is what the pilot reported.

    From a lecture series on critical thinking, I expected the words and sentence structures to be a little more precise. It got a little loose thus clarity was lost.

    He also offers a lot of evolutionary explanations and uses a "bandwagon" fallacy to support evolution. He speaks of gaps in evolution as if it is mere details instead of very large holes in evolutionary theory. Instead of embracing this critical thinking he dismisses it with an ad hominem "Evolution Deniers".

    Then he engages in the construction of logical argument. Given that he argued that your brain is flawed and cannot be trusted, why should anyone take the arguments and logic from someone else's brain?

    BHis explanation on logical argument is a bit weak. You'd be better off getting a quick primer. He confuses terms and conflates them.

    Have not finished the lectures but am not finding them worthwhile

    10 of 15 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brendan Roseville, MN, United States 08-07-13
    Brendan Roseville, MN, United States 08-07-13 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    7
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    195
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great primer on thinking"
    What did you love best about Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills?

    Dr. Novella is very good at communicating, which made this course easy to listen to. Of course the content was excellent as well.


    Any additional comments?

    I highly recommend this book to anyone curious about how science, skepticism, or critical thinking.

    7 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeffrey 02-06-15
    Jeffrey 02-06-15
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Uninteresting and poorly organized"
    What disappointed you about Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills?

    I found the piece had little new information for me and didn't present its idea effectively. When I have to decipher what someone is saying because of their poor choice of words and lack of flow in what should a polished, published peice like this then there's a problem. The examples and stories were boring and a few times were misinformed.


    How could the performance have been better?

    I felt like this whole thing was done in a single, poor take. The professors constant use of the word 'literally' was a bit obnoxious.


    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
Sort by:
  • Peter
    3/22/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Excellent but listen like a true sceptic"
    What did you like most about Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills?

    Overall and excellent overview of the way to attempt to cultivate a rational and balanced view.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    There are no characters in this audiobook.


    What about Professor Steven Novella’s performance did you like?

    As with all the Great Courses the narrator is the expert and thus has a natural passion and thorough knowledge of what they are speaking about. This intimate connection is essential to enjoying an audiobook but is lacking in so many books that have employed professional narrators who clearly have little idea about the tone and rhythm appropriate to the subject matter.


    Any additional comments?

    I found some of the author's views to be strikingly incoherent.

    The author seems to believe that media outlets have sufficient staff to thoroughly investigate an international act of terror, stocks and shares trading by multi-national financial corporations, the CIA/FBI, senior government officials and foreign governments yet he also states that they do not have the resources to employ a qualified science editor to research articles before publishing them.

    He also completely ignores the complication of economics and politics that are intertwined with coverage by all modern media outlets whether this be the desire to retain large advertising contracts to the fact that governments have the jurisdiction and power to prevent information that they do not want to be exposed from being broadcast or published through laws that incorporate national security.

    The method the author uses to reach his conclusions during some sections of the book are glib, presumptuous and rather hypocritical given the overall lesson of this audio book.

    The author's own fallibilities only serve to highlight how easy it is to enter into lazy group think and lose a true sceptic's approach of dissecting and analysing information.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    York
    7/7/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "This covers it all"

    So as a scientist, this is an area of great personal interest and I've done a huge amount of background reading in this subject. This one book covers all aspects of critical thinking. If you are familiar with this area, then be prepared to hear some of the same examples you will have come across elsewhere, but don't let that put you off. This is clear and well laid out and I wish everyone could listen to it.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Stan
    Auckland, New Zealand
    9/29/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Excellent listen"

    Dr Steven Novella has written an excellent series of lessons that really helps one understand why people believe strange things. More importantly though, he explains how our own brains can deceive us. Ever wondered how everyone else around you remembers something completely different to how you remember it? Or how someone can come to a completely different conclusion to something than you did, even though you both had the exact same data? This book is fascinating and helps one realise, just because you saw it/ heard it/ analysed it (etc.) doesn't mean you'll come to the correct conclusion unless you take steps to ensure you don't let personal bias get in the way.

    His many years as a teacher at Yale and podcasting ensure it is very easy to listen to this series of lectures. Broken down into half hour sessions, you can go through it is small chunks (I listened to it in three large chunks though, I was enjoying it so much). The one criticism I would have, being an audiobook, the times Dr Novella mentions different visual phenomena that fool us becomes a little difficult, not having the picture in front of you (some are famous and probably don't need an accompanying picture, but some aren't). The same with the audio phenomena. It would have been easy to include them in the audiobook. There also appeared to be mention of a workbook, which I could not find out anything about.

    Having said that, those few issues were not serious enough for me to take any marks off. This is a great book with some truly fascinating things to learn, read in a way that made the time pass by so quickly.

    Thoroughly recommend it.

    15 of 18 people found this review helpful
  • Luke
    7/20/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A great insight into the ways we think"
    If you could sum up Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills in three words, what would they be?

    Insightful, useful, applicable


    What did you like best about this story?

    The useful and applicable methods to make the most of our inherent methods of thinking


    What about Professor Steven Novella’s performance did you like?

    Engaging examples, useful approaches


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No


    Any additional comments?

    Highly recommended for everyone, especially those whose work depends on thinking

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    Somerset, UK
    7/12/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "How to grow your brain & explode your ego!"

    This course will grow your brain by challenging your beliefs and give you a clear process to reality check any of your conclusions. In other words, putting your dearest most lovingly held beliefs through the meat grinder of scientific critical thinking. Not for the faint hearted! It is not about how to be right, although it could be, but hopefully it will explode your ego in the same way it has mine and give you the tools you need to have more humility in the face of your thoughts and beliefs.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • H. Suppiah
    6/15/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Brilliant introduction to objective thinking"
    What did you like most about Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills?

    The topic was presented with multiple, easy to understand, examples. Despite it being a "scientific guide", it is presented for a wide demographic


    What does Professor Steven Novella bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

    Prof Novella was able to bring about several personal anecdotes to emphasize certain points


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Ben
    LONDON, United Kingdom
    8/31/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A toolkit for life"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    This is quite the most useful course I have bought, I have so many bookmarks and notes in this. I felt the need to have the content: including heuristics and logical fallacies memorised so that I can steer a safe course around the hucksters of modern advertising and over the pitfall of modern life.


    What other book might you compare Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills to, and why?

    It's pretty unique, but if I had to I'd say it reads like a survival guide (or a handbook to common problems you might be having with your wetware). The problem/issue is stated clearly (usually some kind of problem with perception or the brain's habit of creating useful but problematic short cuts to methodical truth evaluation) then a useful label then the remedy to ameliorate the problem, cool I promise.


    What about Professor Steven Novella’s performance did you like?

    Engaging, I love the supporting evidence the set up so to speak for the course, fascinating!


    If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    Lol, it would be a documentary and it might be:The brain a users guide, or Under the hood


    Any additional comments?

    Thanks great courses

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • George
    9/17/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Outstanding"

    Outstanding courses! Difficult to grasp in one go the amount of information. Reviewing necessary in order to fully understand the topics.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Nadine
    8/8/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "I found this very engaging, enjoyed every minute"

    Easy listening, enjoyable lectures. I would definitely recommend this audio book. Discusses a wide array of the cognitive biases we are all subject too.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    7/31/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great intelecual journey"

    Totally recommend for everyone who seeks to improve their critical thinking skills.

    I might listen it for the 2nd time and pick some scientific terms and think these courses thru one more time.

    Really usefull and don't forget to improve your scientific knowledge. Good luck.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.