We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
Turing's Cathedral Audiobook

Turing's Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe

Regular Price:$33.60
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

Legendary historian and philosopher of science George Dyson vividly re-creates the scenes of focused experimentation, incredible mathematical insight, and pure creative genius that gave us computers, digital television, modern genetics, models of stellar evolution - in other words, computer code.

In the 1940s and '50s, a group of eccentric geniuses - led by John von Neumann - gathered at the newly created Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Their joint project was the realization of the theoretical universal machine, an idea that had been put forth by mathematician Alan Turing. This group of brilliant engineers worked in isolation, almost entirely independent from industry and the traditional academic community. But because they relied exclusively on government funding, the government wanted its share of the results: the computer that they built also led directly to the hydrogen bomb. George Dyson has uncovered a wealth of new material about this project, and in bringing the story of these men and women and their ideas to life, he shows how the crucial advancements that dominated twentieth-century technology emerged from one computer in one laboratory, where the digital universe as we know it was born.

©2012 George Dyson (P)2012 Random House Audio

What the Critics Say

“The most powerful technology of the last century was not the atomic bomb, but software - and both were invented by the same folks. Even as they were inventing it, the original geniuses imagined almost everything software has become since. At long last, George Dyson delivers the untold story of software’s creation. It is an amazing tale brilliantly deciphered.” (Kevin Kelly, cofounder of WIRED magazine, author of What Technology Wants)

“It is a joy to read George Dyson’s revelation of the very human story of the invention of the electronic computer, which he tells with wit, authority, and insight. Read Turing’s Cathedral as both the origin story of our digital universe and as a perceptive glimpse into its future.” (W. Daniel Hillis, inventor of The Connection Machine, author of The Pattern on the Stone)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.0 (195 )
5 star
 (82)
4 star
 (54)
3 star
 (39)
2 star
 (13)
1 star
 (7)
Overall
3.9 (169 )
5 star
 (77)
4 star
 (37)
3 star
 (30)
2 star
 (17)
1 star
 (8)
Story
4.1 (167 )
5 star
 (70)
4 star
 (59)
3 star
 (31)
2 star
 (6)
1 star
 (1)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Robert Cowan 11-25-15 Member Since 2015

    Mostly like non fiction are tech, business and history. Like tech based fiction

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    33
    8
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Very detailed and interesting story about the birth of digital computers but very heavy going at times"

    The story gives a very detailed and at times complex overview of how digital computers as we know them were primarily driven the establishment of an institute based at Princeton and the brilliant men and women that worked there. At times the story got very detailed and found myself struggling to get through. If you want a detailed history of these people and events this is the book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    pcwright@prodigy.net Los Angeles 01-14-15
    pcwright@prodigy.net Los Angeles 01-14-15 Member Since 2002

    Audiobooks changed my life. My career as a trial lawyer left no time for recreational anything, much less reading. But then . . .

    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    7
    4
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Like the subject? You will enjoy this book."

    This is about some of the most important people of the 20th Century you may have never heard of. John Von Neumann? maybe, but Stanley Ulam? It was a first for me. For better or worse and people do see these thing differently, the relentless implementation of ideas from from almost nothing to today's laptop, cell phone and even that thing that manages your automobile engine and are now seemingly crucial to our lives, perhaps even to our civilization. I read this book almost two years ago and it made me dizzy with the extraordinary stories of ultra (pun intended) brilliant human beings and the amazingly creative solutions they devised to make the first universal computing machine from parts so crude and unreliable that you would have never given it a chance. Much of what they devised is not only standard in today's computer programs, but are named after them. Recently, I saw the movie, "The Imitation Game" which focused on Alan Turing's remarkable contribution the British breaking the Nazi's unbreakable code and in no insignificant way win the war. So, I gave Turing's Cathedral another shot. Let's face it, you could read it five times and the information is so densely packed you will get large new insights and understanding each time. As I said at the beginning, you have to like the subject matter, but if you do, you will really enjoy this book - perhaps again, and even again.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Simon 05-08-14
    Simon 05-08-14 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    38
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "This book cannot see the wood for the trees"
    What disappointed you about Turing's Cathedral?

    So many irrelevant facts it is really hard to pay attention and filter out the interesting parts... It feels like there are 100 irrelevant pieces of information for every relevant insight.
    For a book called "Turing's Cathedral" you would expect Alan Turing to play at least a decent part... I'm amazed to have gotten nearly a quarter through the book and he has barely been mentioned.


    Would you ever listen to anything by George Dyson again?

    Not likely.


    How could the performance have been better?

    Stick to the relevant facts and tell what must be a compelling story about the key players involved in creating the field of computing.


    What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

    Frustration...


    Any additional comments?

    Disappointed to have used a Credit on this.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Gary Las Cruces, NM, United States 08-08-12
    Gary Las Cruces, NM, United States 08-08-12 Member Since 2016

    l'enfer c'est les autres

    HELPFUL VOTES
    2094
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    713
    261
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    279
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Too much history not enough Turing"

    One of the few books where I did not listen to all of it. I generally love any book about Turing or information theory, but he delved too much in to the history. I really didn't need to know that the Indian tribe was on the site of the think tank before the think tank was built on it and so on. Not enough on Turing and his theory and too much history for my taste. (If you like history more than information theory, the book can work for you and go ahead and give it a try)

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Scott SUNNYVALE, CA, United States 07-13-12
    Scott SUNNYVALE, CA, United States 07-13-12 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    14
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    8
    8
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Excellent modern history of science"

    This book has real value to those interested in the history of computation. So many history of science books are thin and give the reader almost nothing, but if you are really interested in mathematics and computation you will enjoy this book.

    The Narrator does a good job, not great but solid performance.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    J. KINSELLA Boston, MA 06-20-12
    J. KINSELLA Boston, MA 06-20-12 Member Since 2013
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    20
    3
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Wandering narrative"
    What disappointed you about Turing's Cathedral?

    Lack of structure in the book. It switches between history and personal prognostication of the author.


    Would you ever listen to anything by George Dyson again?

    Probably not


    What does Arthur Morey bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Narration was fine


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Turing's Cathedral?

    It is actually two books: 1) a history of computing centered around Princeton personalities, and 2) author's dabbling in computer futures


    Any additional comments?

    Did I just listen to that audio book, or did the audio book listen to me? Say that phrase a few hundred times and you will know what it feels like listening to 2nd half of the book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Carlos 04-29-12
    Carlos 04-29-12
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "recent science applied allready"

    Most scientific discoveries take a long time to make it to the general public. In the case of mathematics this is even more visible, people applying mathematics in real life, usually hear the names from antiquity to the renaissance, but seldom the names of people of the twenty century.
    Computer science is a recent science, and here we hear about people that can have existed in our lifetime who changed the world with science and technology.
    I was surprised to find out that the architecture of our computers has been thought out so recently. (Which actually shows me how little I thought about the subject) And that for the pioneers of the forties, the choices aren't as evident as they appear to be now.
    Recent history can seem so distant when you take things for granted.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Matthew D. Powell 03-30-12 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    6
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    39
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Quite a book. A bit deep but worth the time"

    Quite a well researched anthology of technology, math, science and brains that pull it all together.

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Hal Miami, FL, United States 05-10-12
    Hal Miami, FL, United States 05-10-12 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
    101
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    198
    38
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    4
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Information overload"

    The book starts out with a bang: with an explanation of how the atomic bomb and the computer were motivated by the same forces, with the same potential for destruction.

    But it quickly gets bogged down details, instead of keeping the overall story firmly in mind. The author uncovered tons of details, and cannot resist showing them off.

    I didn't even make it though the first part.

    2 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mark Sydney, Australia 12-18-12
    Mark Sydney, Australia 12-18-12 Member Since 2011
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A little too much information (of the wrong type)"
    What disappointed you about Turing's Cathedral?

    Call me a starry-eyed optimist but when I read the name Turing in the title of a book I expect a little something on computable numbers, perhaps a bit of incompleteness theorem, a little bit about Manchester, but not that a bunch of people drank around 9000 cups of tea at 5.2 cents each. I kept jumping forward with the hope of finding something interesting. I guess I chose the wrong book.


    What was most disappointing about George Dyson’s story?

    See above.


    What three words best describe Arthur Morey’s performance?

    Read with conviction.


    What character would you cut from Turing's Cathedral?

    Most of them.


    0 of 2 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.