The Trauma of Everyday Life Audiobook | Mark Epstein M.D. | Audible.com
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The Trauma of Everyday Life | [Mark Epstein M.D.]

The Trauma of Everyday Life

Trauma does not just happen to a few unlucky people; it is the bedrock of our psychology. Death and illness touch us all, but even the everyday sufferings of loneliness and fear are traumatic. In The Trauma of Everyday Life renowned psychiatrist and author of Thoughts Without a Thinker, Mark Epstein uncovers the transformational potential of trauma, revealing how it can be used for the mind's own development. Western psychology teaches that if we understand the cause of trauma, we might move past it while many drawn to Eastern practices see meditation as a means of rising above, or distancing themselves from, their most difficult emotions.
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Publisher's Summary

Trauma does not just happen to a few unlucky people; it is the bedrock of our psychology. Death and illness touch us all, but even the everyday sufferings of loneliness and fear are traumatic. In The Trauma of Everyday Life renowned psychiatrist and author of Thoughts Without a Thinker, Mark Epstein uncovers the transformational potential of trauma, revealing how it can be used for the mind's own development. Western psychology teaches that if we understand the cause of trauma, we might move past it while many drawn to Eastern practices see meditation as a means of rising above, or distancing themselves from, their most difficult emotions. Both, Epstein argues, fail to recognize that trauma is an indivisible part of life and can be used as a lever for growth and an ever-deeper understanding of change. When we regard trauma with this perspective, understanding that suffering is universal and without logic, our pain connects us to the world on a more fundamental level. The way out of pain is through it.

Epstein’s discovery begins in his analysis of the life of Buddha, looking to how the death of his mother informed his path and teachings. The Buddha’s spiritual journey can be read as an expression of primitive agony grounded in childhood trauma. Yet the Buddha’s story is only one of many in The Trauma of Everyday Life. Here, Epstein looks to his own experience, that of his patients, and of the many fellow sojourners and teachers he encounters as a psychiatrist and Buddhist. They are alike only in that they share in trauma, large and small, as all of us do. Epstein finds throughout that trauma, if it doesn’t destroy us, wakes us up to both our minds’ own capacity and to the suffering of others. It makes us more human, caring, and wise. It can be our greatest teacher, our freedom itself, and it is available to all of us.

©2013 Mark Epstein, M.D. (P)2013 Gildan Media LLC

What Members Say

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  •  
    Virginia United States 10-04-13
    Virginia United States 10-04-13
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "This is what i call a GREAT book"

    If you must read one book on pain, suffering ..etc then let it be this one ...
    But let me first clarify that this is a Buddhist book filled with the teachings of the Buddha ...it is also filled with information about the life of the Buddha, but that usually comes with a purpose ...
    I cannot praise this book enough ... as it helped me finally OPEN my eyes to reality instead of dreaming away with all the self-help junk i have read throughout the years ..
    An insightful ... sobering ... well written book
    note: i didn't like the narration at all ...

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sharon ELK GROVE VILLAGE, IL, United States 03-22-14
    Sharon ELK GROVE VILLAGE, IL, United States 03-22-14 Member Since 2012
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    "Trauma of the Buddhas Everyday Life"
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    Folks with an interest in a psychoanalysis of the Buddha.


    What could Mark Epstein M.D. have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

    Nothing. It is just a subject I have no interest in. I feel The title, and representation of the book was misleading.


    What didn’t you like about Walter Dixon’s performance?

    His reading had a sense of urgency to it. Sounded as though he was time limited.


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Trauma of Everyday Life?

    I would definitely cut all the analysis.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Marcia Culina, OH, United States 11-03-13
    Marcia Culina, OH, United States 11-03-13
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    "Not what I expected--very boring"
    What disappointed you about The Trauma of Everyday Life?

    I heard the author on a New York radio show and he sounded interesting--unfortunately the book was not.


    What do you think your next listen will be?

    Fiction


    How could the performance have been better?

    More inflection.


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Trauma of Everyday Life?

    It is a book about Buddhism. I thought it would be more practical having heard him speak on the radio.


    0 of 2 people found this review helpful
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