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The Talent Code: Unlocking the Secret of Skill in Sports, Art, Music, Math, and Just About Anything | [Daniel Coyle]

The Talent Code: Unlocking the Secret of Skill in Sports, Art, Music, Math, and Just About Anything

New research has revealed that myelin, once considered an inert form of insulation for brain cells, may be the holy grail of acquiring skill. Journalist Daniel Coyle spent years investigating talent hotbeds, interviewing world-class practitioners (top soccer players, violinists, fighter, pilots, artists, and bank robbers) and neuroscientists. In clear, accessible language, he presents a solid strategy for skill acquisition.
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Publisher's Summary

A New York Times best-selling author explores cutting-edge brain science to learn where talent comes from, how it grows, and how we can make ourselves smarter.

How does a penniless Russian tennis club with one indoor court create more top 20 women players than the entire United States? How did a small town in rural Italy produce the dozens of painters and sculptors who ignited the Italian Renaissance? Why are so many great soccer players from Brazil?

Where does talent come from, and how does it grow?

New research has revealed that myelin, once considered an inert form of insulation for brain cells, may be the holy grail of acquiring skill. Journalist Daniel Coyle spent years investigating talent hotbeds, interviewing world-class practitioners (top soccer players, violinists, fighter, pilots, artists, and bank robbers) and neuroscientists. In clear, accessible language, he presents a solid strategy for skill acquisition - in athletics, fine arts, languages, science or math - that can be successfully applied through a person's entire lifespan.

©2009 Daniel Coyle; (P)2009 HighBridge Company

What the Critics Say

"I only wish I'd never before used the words 'breakthrough' or 'breathtaking' or 'magisterial' or 'stunning achievement' or 'your world will never be the same after you read this book.' Then I could be using them for the first and only time as I describe my reaction to Daniel Coyle's The Talent Code." (Tom Peters)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.1 (779 )
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Performance
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  •  
    monte reed 08-15-11
    monte reed 08-15-11 Member Since 2005
    HELPFUL VOTES
    7
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    "great book"

    great book, very interesting listen. not sure if i learned much from the book, but reinforce the theories i have about talents

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Bald Brunswick, ME, United States 07-31-11
    Bald Brunswick, ME, United States 07-31-11 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Interesting"

    I enjoyed it, good writing and moves right along. Interesting to think of how myelin works.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Joe Stewart Florida, Mo USA 06-10-11
    Joe Stewart Florida, Mo USA 06-10-11

    Live united !

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "myelin"

    In short all advices from this book can be summarized as follows : Practice a lot , make mistake , try harder , find a good coach , you getting older means you loose "myelin". Thats it. However first 40 minutes are interested.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tiran North Vancouver, BC, Canada 03-09-11
    Tiran North Vancouver, BC, Canada 03-09-11 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Fantastic book!"

    This is book is one of the best in its kind. I wish I read this during my teenage years. I wish I read it during my university years. I recommend this book to all parents, teachers, coaches and university profs. The advices are backed by strong evidence and studies but most importantly, they make lots of sense.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeremy Walnut Creek, CA, United States 02-04-11
    Jeremy Walnut Creek, CA, United States 02-04-11 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Listened to it twice in a row"

    As a lifelong martial artist, a teacher, and athletic coach, I found this book inspiring. It has completely changed the way I look at learning, excellence, behaviors, habits, etc. I highly recommend this book to anyone trying to get "better" (better at anything!)

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Optimized_Shopping Las Vegas, NV, United States 11-26-10
    Optimized_Shopping Las Vegas, NV, United States 11-26-10

    Optimized_Shopping

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    25
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    "boring, nonfocused and a drag"

    I was eagerly anticipating some interesting observations or findings from the authors of this book. But after many hours of listening on the train, I have not yet heard anything worthwhile. The book doesn't get to the point, and the author talks about piano playing girls are better in one place vs another due to different pracitce habit/enviorment, etc... pass this one and go for another, if you are looking for good listens on commutes. If you have a 10 hour drive ahead of you, then give it a try.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Competition Rider 11-04-10
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Practice, practice, practice--and start young"

    Read the title above.

    There, I saved you a credit.

    The book isn't awful, but the title of my comment sums it up. Worth a listen if you can get it cheap.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jennifer Magnolia, IA, USA 05-29-10
    Jennifer Magnolia, IA, USA 05-29-10
    ratings
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    "Benificial"

    This book is lets me know that failure is okay, growth is slow, and I can change.

    It shows me how to inspire children, teach piano to my 3 year old, build one small step at a time.

    I feel like I got more out of this book than I did out of 4 years of elementary education college. It left confussion in how to teach, this Daniel Coyle really is clearing up the gaps.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Troy University Place, WA, USA 03-23-10
    Troy University Place, WA, USA 03-23-10 Member Since 2008
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    "Needs a bit more science."

    It felt as though Coyle was trying to fit too much into this book. He mentioned myelin very early in the book, but did too little to support his conclusion that myelination was the root of talent. The talent hotbeds were interesting but not alot in the book to bring the two subjects together into a cohesive argument. Maybe more information about mylenation of subjects from all the talent hotbeds. Just a few wholes in the reasoning. Altogether, it was entertaining. I wanted more though, about myelin, and research that supported his assertion. There is some useful information on coaching and teaching towards the end. Its worth reading.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Will McMurray, PA, United States 05-30-12
    Will McMurray, PA, United States 05-30-12 Member Since 2010
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    "This book was worth every penny!"

    This book explains myelin and its reactions to the learning process. It also gives many great real world accounts of increasing one's own abilities. I found both the topic and the stories fascinating.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
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