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The Story of Earth: The First 4.5 Billion Years, from Stardust to Living Planet | [Robert M. Hazen]

The Story of Earth: The First 4.5 Billion Years, from Stardust to Living Planet

Earth evolves. From first atom to molecule, mineral to magma, granite crust to single cell to verdant living landscape, ours is a planet constantly in flux. In this radical new approach to Earth’s biography, senior Carnegie Institution researcher and national best-selling author Robert M. Hazen reveals how the co-evolution of the geosphere and biosphere - of rocks and living matter - has shaped our planet into the only one of its kind in the Solar System, if not the entire cosmos.
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Publisher's Summary

Earth evolves. From first atom to molecule, mineral to magma, granite crust to single cell to verdant living landscape, ours is a planet constantly in flux. In this radical new approach to Earth’s biography, senior Carnegie Institution researcher and national best-selling author Robert M. Hazen reveals how the co-evolution of the geosphere and biosphere - of rocks and living matter - has shaped our planet into the only one of its kind in the Solar System, if not the entire cosmos.

With an astrobiologist’s imagination, a historian’s perspective, and a naturalist’s passion for the ground beneath our feet, Hazen explains how changes on an atomic level translate into dramatic shifts in Earth’s makeup over its 4.567 billion year existence. He calls upon a flurry of recent discoveries to portray our planet’s many iterations in vivid detail - from its fast-rotating infancy when the Sun rose every 5 hours and the Moon filled 250 times more sky than it does now, to its sea-bathed youth, before the first continents arose; from the Great Oxidation Event that turned the land red, to the globe-altering volcanism that may have been the true killer of the dinosaurs. Through Hazen’s theory of “co-evolution,” we learn how reactions between organic molecules and rock crystals may have generated Earth’s first organisms, which in turn are responsible for more than two-thirds of the mineral varieties on the planet - thousands of different kinds of crystals that could not exist in a nonliving world.

The Story of Earth is also the story of the pioneering men and women behind the sciences. Listeners will meet black-market meteorite hawkers of the Sahara Desert, the gun-toting Feds who guarded the Apollo missions’ lunar dust, and the World War II Navy officer whose super-pressurized “bomb” - recycled from military hardware - first simulated the molten rock of Earth’s mantle. As a mentor to a new generation of scientists, Hazen introduces the intrepid young explorers whose dispatches from Earth’s harshest landscapes will revolutionize geology.

Celebrated by The New York Times for writing “with wonderful clarity about science . . . that effortlessly teaches as it zips along,” Hazen proves a brilliant and entertaining guide on this grand tour of our planet inside and out. Lucid, controversial, and intellectually bracing, The Story of Earth is popular science of the highest order.

©2012 Robert M. Hazen (P)2012 Gildan Media, LLC

What the Critics Say

“A fascinating new theory on the Earth’s origins written in a sparkling style with many personal touches. . . . Hazen offers startling evidence that ‘Earth’s living and nonliving spheres’ have co-evolved over the past four billion years.” (Kirkus Reviews)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.1 (535 )
5 star
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Story
4.1 (468 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Jewan K. Sukhdeo 06-25-14
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    4
    1
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    Performance
    Story
    "Awesome Narration and content."
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes. Eye opener. The story is compelling.


    What other book might you compare The Story of Earth to and why?

    Water


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No


    Any additional comments?

    A must read if you live on this planet.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Joe HOOVER, AL, United States 03-04-14
    Joe HOOVER, AL, United States 03-04-14 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Nerdy Geology at its finest?"
    What did you like best about The Story of Earth? What did you like least?

    I liked that the Story of Earth is interesting.....if also boring. It's easy to be intrigued by the (many) things I didn't know about the history of our planet but it's also just as easy to back away from. There was certainly a limit to the amount of detailed knowledge I was willing to quickly accept at a given sitting.


    Were the concepts of this book easy to follow, or were they too technical?

    Depends. At times I was on board with Hazen but others I got lost in details. I think this has a lot to do with the numbers of it all. Throughout the book, Hazen describes geological facts in terms of a timeline. For me, it became increasingly difficult to keep that timeline straight. In the first place, it's a massive timeline on a scale which the entirety of human history is but a tiny speck at the end, indistinguishable and unimportant. Secondly, 530 millions years ago sounds and feels just as remote as 350 million years ago. The numbers are just so large and the pace of reading so fast that it is no small task to process the wheres and whens of all the different ideas Hazen discusses. On that note, Hazen tends to jump to other eons and for a complete novice like me, this become confusing quickly. I effectively disregarded the detail of age and concentrated on the overall issue Hazen was attempting to explain. In this way, the book became easier to read and easier to process while maintaining the essence of Hazen's narration. I'm sure I missed some details on the way, but my sanity is still intact.

    Also, for a listen, I was probably even more handicapped. A visual representation of a number has a different value than a heard number.


    Which character – as performed by Walter Dixon – was your favorite?

    Mother Earth :)


    Did The Story of Earth inspire you to do anything?

    Nope.


    Any additional comments?

    I have rated this 3-stars principally because the subject didn't hold my interest enough. This is just an issue of personal preference. There were definite moments where I was presented ideas that I never heard prior and concepts that were utterly foreign to my preconceptions to the subject. But these moments of surprise, intrigue, and awe were not the majority but were enough to fuel the engine to continue the book until the end. I imagine those more interested in geology, the Earth, or other life/earth science would be more connected to The Story of Earth. As for me, I'm glad I read it but I'm equally glad it's over.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Rick Irving, Texas 02-18-14
    Rick Irving, Texas 02-18-14 Member Since 2003

    Rick

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    "Listened to it twice might listen again"

    This is the history of Earth told from the minerals perspective. Hazen is an excellent story teller and makes the subject very digestible. If you find gems and mineral formations interesting but you dont know much about what they are made of or how they got where they are; Hazen has the right amount of detail to get you started and the big story that will keep you digging once you start. Not all technical books translate well to audio but Hazen 's story telling and Dixon's narration make this one of the most enjoyable technical books I have ever listened to.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sam Motes Tampa 02-15-14
    Sam Motes Tampa 02-15-14 Listener Since 2009

    Audible obsessed lifelong learner.

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    "Great read"

    This was a thought provoking look at the 5 billion year history on the world at a the rock and mineral level as the elements interact with each other via evolutionary changes. . It is a also a horror story on a billion year scale. 2 billion years from now vast deserts. In 5 billion years the sun expires. Hazen harkens back to Sagan's call for humanity to have to seek a post world existence given the inevitable.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    danny lawrence Charlotte, NC USA 02-08-14
    danny lawrence Charlotte, NC USA 02-08-14 Member Since 2006

    Tell us about yourself!

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Fun science about how our planet got here"

    Squeezing 4.5 billion years into a 10 hour book was quite a feat, but making it interesting to the non scientist (me) was remarkable. From beginning to end the book held my attention and fed me interesting information about the very ground upon which I walk. The science in this book was never dry and I feel I learned a few things despite my enjoying listening to this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Krista Wilbur, WA, United States 01-22-14
    Krista Wilbur, WA, United States 01-22-14 Member Since 2008
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    "Twist on an old story."

    A look at the changing Earth from the minerals up. I really enjoyed the book and narration. Haden does a very nice job at tying the chemistry of the inorganic and organic together.

    I love science non-fiction whether physics, biology or cosmology- and now geology finally. If you like geology or collecting rocks, this adds to the story of each rock. If you like learning about how the Earth and life began, this brings more detail into focus on the role minerals played and the effect of life on the minerals we see today.

    Easy to listen to and follow. I will definitely listen again to absorb even more. Walter Dixon narrated beautifully. I would look for more titles that he has read as well.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Russell Carlsbad, CA, United States 09-12-13
    Russell Carlsbad, CA, United States 09-12-13 Member Since 2015
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    Story
    "Great story. Well told."
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    A captivating story of how the Earth and our moon have come to be. How this pale blue dot become teeming with life.


    What other book might you compare The Story of Earth to and why?

    Cosmos, A Universe from Nothing


    Which scene was your favorite?

    A solar eclipse when the Earth was young and a day lasted five hours and the moon was 10 times the size of the sun in the sky.


    Any additional comments?

    The reader was Walter Dixon and he does a great job!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Bunto Skiffler 12-10-12

    We'll be greeted as liberators.

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    "I give it a 5-5-5 hat trick"

    Walter Dixon, like the pro that he is, gives his A-game here. Hazen's writing is most interesting and compelling, they both really work out well together. Should definitely do another audiobook in the near future IMHO.

    Epic, biblicalish, wide-in-scope, easy, clear and on-target.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dr. 09-08-12
    Dr. 09-08-12

    kjlacovara

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    "Narrator spoils the book"
    Would you be willing to try another one of Walter Dixon’s performances?

    No. I'm a geologist and Walter Dixon spoils the book for me with his many mispronunciations of geological terms. One would think he would have researched these words in advance. Examples of botched words include: rhythmites (as in tidal rhythmites), peridotite, and plagioclase. There are many more.


    12 of 25 people found this review helpful
  •  
    trinity United States 01-21-14
    trinity United States 01-21-14 Member Since 2012
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    Story
    "poor science mainly guesswork"
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    Someone who likes discussing possibly real events that are impossible to prove that migbt have happened.


    What was most disappointing about Robert M. Hazen’s story?

    This book uses mostly unsure language. There are a lot of possiblies and suggestings and maybies and ifs but no real concrete ideas. No concrete science. Robert didn't discuss any competing theories and how the evidence could point to totally different conclusions. Very incomplete and simplistic work. Most of this book is so insubstantial that it doesn't warrant saying.


    What three words best describe Walter Dixon’s performance?

    Average


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Story of Earth?

    Anything that uses unsure language and is not concrete. His use of words that describe cells learning or getting ideas. That's just dumb.


    Any additional comments?

    So humans evolved over the course of 80 million years? Why is there not life everywhere if its that easy?

    0 of 2 people found this review helpful

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