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The Righteous Mind Audiobook

The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion

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Publisher's Summary

Why can’t our political leaders work together as threats loom and problems mount? Why do people so readily assume the worst about the motives of their fellow citizens?

In The Righteous Mind, social psychologist Jonathan Haidt explores the origins of our divisions and points the way forward to mutual understanding. His starting point is moral intuition - the nearly instantaneous perceptions we all have about other people and the things they do. These intuitions feel like self-evident truths, making us righteously certain that those who see things differently are wrong.

Haidt shows us how these intuitions differ across cultures, including the cultures of the political left and right. He blends his own research findings with those of anthropologists, historians, and other psychologists to draw a map of the moral domain, and he explains why conservatives can navigate that map more skillfully than can liberals. He then examines the origins of morality, overturning the view that evolution made us fundamentally selfish creatures.

But rather than arguing that we are innately altruistic, he makes a more subtle claim - that we are fundamentally groupish. It is our groupishness, he explains, that leads to our greatest joys, our religious divisions, and our political affiliations. In a stunning final chapter on ideology and civility, Haidt shows what each side is right about, and why we need the insights of liberals, conservatives, and libertarians to flourish as a nation.

Download the accompanying reference guide.

©2012 Jonathan Haidt (P)2012 Gildan Media LLC

What the Critics Say

"Haidt is looking for more than victory. He's looking for wisdom. That's what makes The Righteous Mind well worth reading…. a landmark contribution to humanity’s understanding of itself.” (The New York Times Book Review)

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  •  
    TaxSage Atlanta 02-12-14
    TaxSage Atlanta 02-12-14 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Genius mumbled"

    The author chose to narrate his own material. His excitement for portions of the text constantly leaves him with mumbled, out of breath finishes to sentences. This is a remarkable problem in that it is so correctable. The author's material is brilliant, and he surely knows it so well that he doesn't notice the mumbled readings, but is there no editor to demand improved diction and retakes?

    14 of 19 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sierra Bravo 02-13-16 Member Since 2002

    Semi retired small business person/ college professor/ investor.

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    "Last great chance to stop all of the Hate"

    This should be required reading before people are allowed to voice opinions in the political process. (Kidding since that would restrict free speech) Still such a requirement wold hopefully tone down the hate that has become standard fair in political circles. It was refreshing to be reminded that the other side is not evil, just different in their approach to what is morally right. Interesting to learn how our brains work in this department and how we can strive to be more thoughtful before our subconscious completely takes over. Fascinating reading into how we both innately feel and learn what is right and wrong.

    A very worthwhile read if you are one of the very few who actually want to understand why people who think differently from you think as they do. Lest you think I an too hopeful I have decided on the headlines of the book reviews in two different publications. The NY Times will headline "Research shows liberals care more about others than conservatives". The National Review will headline "Research shows liberals have an unbalanced moral foundation".

    Finally this book explains why an economic conservative, libertarian, recent Christ follower such as myself is so conflicted on what is moral.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Floyd Clark 10-26-15
    Floyd Clark 10-26-15 Member Since 2015
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    "This should give you pause."

    I just finish this book and I have to admit it give me a great deal of pause As a liberal thinker, i've tried to fully understand the counterpoints to liberalism. And sometimes find myself wondering "why would anybody want to be a conservative?" Well, I seem to understand better now. Not that I'm going to abandon liberalism, but rather try to understand conservatism better.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Muhammad Najmie 09-18-15
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    "Understand the other side (liberal/conservative)"

    First, review of the book, then the audiobook.

    The book itself is a mind-opener. Mind-opener seems a mediocre word, but I don't know of any superlative. This book is a life-changer for me, my view of this world has totally changed. It is easy for anyone to say someone else is close-minded when they refuse to see things from one's perspective, but actually that person is equally close-minded. This book actually made me realize my close-mindedness and made me see how the other side of liberalism/conservatism (or left/right) thinks.

    On the audiobook, the narration is by the author himself. He did an excellent job. His tone is calm yet not too laid-back. He even describes his images/visuals/diagrams in the book, even blind people can read his book (including the visuals) through his narration.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    DenverAlex 04-22-15
    DenverAlex 04-22-15 Listener Since 2008
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    "I wish everyone would take the time to read this!"

    my husband is a conservative and I am a mother, we need to learn how to listen and consider each other's directives.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    James 04-04-15
    James 04-04-15 Member Since 2016
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    "How Not to Offend Our Secret Cows"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes! Because the information is helpful.


    What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

    The narration of this Audible audiobook by the author is just OK, however I think it could have benefited from a professional reader/performer. Tone and tambour of professional voice and knowing when to put the proper inflectional twist can add life and interest when the facts become a bit dull.


    What about Jonathan Haidt’s performance did you like?

    The narration of this Audible audiobook by the author is just OK! He annunciated the words clearly and the meter moved along nicely. The voice is not unpleasant but it lacks liveliness.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    Yes, the metaphor at the start of each of the three parts I found useful.


    Any additional comments?

    One of the biggest problems of the modern political scene is the right cannot seem to communicate with the left and the converse is also true. Whether we all get together at Thanksgiving, Christmas, or Easter or at an office gathering, we all have that certain relative or office friend you know you cannot discuss politics with, without sending them into what seems like a torrent angry words, bordering on foaming at the mouth, and an implacable wall of not hearing a word you say. This book written by, social and cultural psychologist, Ph.D. Jonathan Haidt, explains why certain issues are a “hot button issue” on either the right or the left. He does this by providing a metaphor for understanding the interaction of the unconscious mind and the conscious mind when it formulates its sense of right and wrong, known as morals in PART ONE of the book. This section is how the individual mind works. How it marries the emotional feeling unreasoning part of our brain with the rational conscious articulate part of our brain. In PART TWO, he provides a different metaphor to explain why morals have different priorities and vary in focus from person to person. Thus at the heart of any dispute between generally honest and moral people, a heated difference in approach can rise to the point where we stop listening to one another. By keeping in mind these differences in approach are not motivated by sinister concerns, we can overcome the divide, and perhaps work toward a common solution. In PART THREE, another metaphor provides a context in which we can understand that we behave differently when we act as an individual and when we act as a group. The emotional need to belong to a group for both survival and comfort is hard wired and can overcome our better individual judgment in the heat of collective passion of herd solidarity.

    Unless you are academically inclined and enjoy reading about experiments designed to get at the root of what drives our behavior, this book can be a bit of a slog at times. However, considering the useful prospective I have extracted from this book and apply to both real life situations and evaluating written material, it is well worth the effort to master the material in this book. When you are on the receiving end of a relative’s diatribe of full troughed, “I hate all taxes and the government that imposes them – rant – rant- rant, there is not one good tax in the last 100 years;” to be able to stop and deflate that expansive gas bubble with one question was priceless. The individual on exhibit is not some cheap hearted, flinty, miserly person. He is in fact a good business man, loving husband, good father, and respected member of his community. But the moral imperative that drives his psyche are a desire to be fair and anger at cheating. When he is feed too many examples of fraud and abuse of the social welfare system, he becomes blinded to his desire to be fair, and totally ignores his sense of Christian caring and a desire to not harm others. What stopped this man’s rant you ask? I simply ask him if he would abolish the social security tax and move his then to be destitute parents in with him. All of a sudden government was not so bad. His blinders were off! We could then discuss rationally, like two human beings, flaws in government welfare policy that could do with some revision to ensure the taxes were going to the truly needy and deserving and the “free riders” were driven out. The reverse of this example is also true. Among some of my leftward leaning friends, when they get their hair on fire over the evil selfish greedy right, “shredding of the social safety net to line their already rich pockets;” I know their moral imperative is driven by a sense of caring for others and to prevent harm from happening to the unfortunate good people. With them, I simply reach into my experience bag from when I was a workers compensation claims adjustor, for an example of a claimant who would use crutches to go into a scheduled medical examination, then exit the exam, toss his crutches into his truck bed, and then drove to a farm where he returned to roofing the barn. I then ask, “Is it fair to allow the undeserving to steal benefits intended for the truly needy from the system?” All of a sudden the flaming hair goes out and a more reasonable tone replaces empty rhetoric.

    What this book did for me? It made me aware that there are two or more sides to most issues. Opponents need not be demonized as evil or stupid just because they differ in your approach to an issue. In recognizing the moral underpinning of their argument and granting their motivation the respect it deserve for their position, I am able to do two things. One is to disrupt the blind rant that really says, “NO ONE LISTENS TO MY MORAL OUTRAGE!” Two lay the basis for dialog when the fires of rage have been quenched. When you recognize the moral underpinning of the rage, you defuse it by in effect saying, “I recognize the morality of your position now let’s talk about a practical solutions like human beings.” Then I am more likely to garner respect and a willingness to hear where I am coming from, and be open to what I am saying. The book “Think Like a Freak” by Ph.D. Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, (reviewed elsewhere) addresses these same problems using the term incentives and persuasion as tools for change.

    Finally, the book makes clear, that people who keep on hitting the key moral receptors that drive an angry reaction are looking to drive movements and form an unreasoning mass in a slavish hive like mentality against a target of rage. When we unconsciously allow ourselves to be manipulated in such a way, it does not lead to good public policy, or privet dispute resolution.

    By using the tools this book provides it has made me a much better consumer of thoughts and ideas, either oral or written. It has also made me better at persuasion when I disagree with those thoughts or ideas. Our moral values are our personal sacred cows. The quickest way to produce discord in the society is to offend others sacred cows. When you offend another’s sacred cow you offend their personhood and foreclose dialog.

    In writing this review I hope to persuade the reader/listener to get this book and consume the content. I have done so by providing two storytelling examples of how the book has benefited me. Hopefully, I have piqued your interest to learn more about the various receptors that underpin our moral values and that drive our action and conversation in life. When confronted with an individual in the throes of moral outrage we have a choice. We can throw the bucket of gas of our own moral outrage on the conflagration and burn it all down; or we can choose the bucket of, “I hear your moral outrage” provide recognition and reason to it, then extinguish the flames and engage in dialog. It has worked for me and I cordially invite you to see if it will work for you. I highly recommend the take away from this book even as I acknowledge a wish it could have been as entertaining in its presentation.

    Personal note: I have both the audio and hardback book. I prefer the cover art on the version published in the United Kingdom’s version in 2012. The cover on the US version in 2013 is plain, dull, and a bit pedantic. The British version will poke you right in the eye. At the bottom of the US Amazon page select United Kingdom to get to the British Amazon. Once there look up 2012 hardback version of “The Righteous Mind” and you will see what I am talking about. They also show the US 2013 version so you can compare the two’s cover art and make up your own mind.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Deep Reader 01-05-15
    Deep Reader 01-05-15

    Learn, understand, then decide whether you accept or reject.

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    "I don't agree with everything here, but..."

    This audiobook presents various answers about why people disagree and seek out the "other people" to attack and try to talk them to switching sides. It also looks at confirmation biases and their reasons.

    Overall, this is a book worth reading.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    TM 10-07-14
    TM 10-07-14

    TJM

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    "Impressive Scope"
    Any additional comments?

    I have listened to a number of evolutionary psychology books including Kahneman's "Thinking Fast and Slow", so I wasn't anticipating many new concepts. I was expecting more of how those well known concepts apply to Political and Religious orientations.

    I was however wrong. For me at least this book broke a lot of new ground by introducing the different dimensions of morality and the concept of 90% chimp and 10% bee. I was convinced by much of it and could apply the concepts from my own personal idiosyncrasies to geo-political history - hows that for breadth!

    One thing that's important to me is how balanced a book is. Whilst I have my own political leanings, I really don't like heavy handedly one-sided books, especially regarding politics. I really felt that Haidt's book speaks to the whole political spectrum and encourages mutual understanding. If only we could get everyone to read it.

    Excellent book - narrated perfectly by the author.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Chad Allen Quick 04-16-14
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    "A MUST read!"
    Any additional comments?

    This is absolutely one of the most important books that I have read in the past 10 years. Reaching across the party isle and understanding one another is not only possible, it is probable, given the insights of this book.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Steven D. Ward 11-21-13
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    "More academic than expected; audiobook-friendly"
    If you could sum up The Righteous Mind in three words, what would they be?

    Understand your neighbors


    What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

    I expected a relatively easy-breezy book, and quickly discovered that was not the case. However, each chapter of the book followed a strict format with an introduction, conclusion, and summary of the main points that made it very audio-book friendly to account for those moments when you space out or the wife asks you a question or whatever and it breaks your attention for a bit.


    What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

    The closing chapters are the best. In particular the founding philosophy of conservativism in which a distinction is drawn between philosophical conservativism and orthodoxy.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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