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The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat: and Other Clinical Tales Audiobook

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat: and Other Clinical Tales

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Audible Editor Reviews

Groundbreaking neurologist Oliver Sacks has written a number of best-selling books on his experiences in the field, some of which have been adapted into film and even opera. Often criticized by fellow scientists for his writerly and anecdotal approach to cases, he is nevertheless beloved by the general public precisely for his willingness to exercise compassion toward his unusual subjects. In his introduction to this audiobook, Sacks himself explains that much of the content is now quite outdated, but he hopes, proudly in his soft British lisp, that The Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat still resonates for its positive attitude and openness toward the neurological conditions described therein.

Audible featured narrator Jonathan Davis is more than up to the task of bringing these case studies to life. He adopts a tone that is both sympathetic and authoritative. In fact, he sounds very much like the actor William Daniels, who voiced the car in the television show Knight Rider, or for a younger generation, played Principal Feeny in the television show Boy Meets World. The stories in this book concern matters of science, to be sure, but they also contain quite as much adventure into uncharted territory as either of those television shows.

The cases are divided into four sections: losses, excesses, transports, and the world of the simple. "Losses" involves people who lack certain abilities, for example, the ability of facial recognition. "Excesses" deals with people who have extra abilities, for example, the tics associated with Tourette's Syndrome. "Transports" involves people who hallucinate, for example, a landscape or music from childhood. "The world of the simple" deals with autism and mental retardation. Though this last section is perhaps the most obviously scientifically outdated section of the book, it also best demonstrates Sacks' deep feeling for the unique gifts of his subjects. Indeed, Davis anchors his delivery of the facts in these admirable empathies, demonstrating that in terms of the cultural perception of neurological conditions, Sacks' early work still has much to teach us. —Megan Volpert

Publisher's Summary

In his most extraordinary book, "one of the great clinical writers of the 20th century" (The New York Times) recounts the case histories of patients lost in the bizarre, apparently inescapable world of neurological disorders. Oliver Sacks' The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat tells the stories of individuals afflicted with fantastic perceptual and intellectual aberrations: patients who have lost their memories and with them the greater part of their pasts; who are no longer able to recognize people and common objects; who are stricken with violent tics and grimaces or who shout involuntary obscenities; whose limbs have become alien; who have been dismissed as retarded yet are gifted with uncanny artistic or mathematical talents.

If inconceivably strange, these brilliant tales remain, in Dr. Sacks' splendid and sympathetic telling, deeply human. They are studies of life struggling against incredible adversity, and they enable us to enter the world of the neurologically impaired, to imagine with our hearts what it must be to live and feel as they do. A great healer, Sacks never loses sight of medicine's ultimate responsibility: "the suffering, afflicted, fighting human subject".

PLEASE NOTE: Some changes have been made to the original manuscript with the permission of Oliver Sacks.

©1970, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1985 Oliver Sacks (P)2011 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"Dr. Sacks's best book.... One sees a wise, compassionate and very literate mind at work in these 20 stories, nearly all remarkable, and many the kind that restore one's faith in humanity." (Chicago Sun-Times)

"Dr. Sacks's most absorbing book.... His tales are so compelling that many of them serve as eerie metaphors not only for the condition of modern medicine but of modern man." (New York magazine)

What Members Say

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  •  
    CHET YARBROUGH LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 08-02-16
    CHET YARBROUGH LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 08-02-16 Member Since 2015

    Faced with mindless duty, when an audio book player slips into a rear pocket and mini buds pop into ears, old is made new again.

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    "OLIVER SACKS"

    Neurological dysfunction is Oliver Sacks field of study and training. The irony is that a tumor attacks his brain to end his life. Of course, he was 82. But somehow, a tumor attacking Sacks’ brain seems an unfair marker for his passing. Sacks opens the eyes of many to the wholeness of being human when a neurological dysfunction changes their lives. Sacks is the famous neurologist who wrote one book that becomes a movie and several that become best sellers.

    Sacks is famous to some based on the movie “Awakenings” that recounts an experiment with L-dopa to treat catatonia; a symptom believed to be triggered by Parkinson’s. Patients may spend years in a state of catatonia; i.e. a form of withdrawal from the world exhibited by a range of behaviors from mutism to verbal repetition. Sacks wrote the book, “Awakenings” to tell of his experience in the summer of 1969 in a Bronx, New York hospital. The success and failure of the L-dopa experiment became a life-long commitment by Sacks to appreciate the fullness of life for those afflicted by neurological disorders. With the use of L-dopa, Sacks reawakens the minds and rational skills of patients that had been catatonic for years. In their reawakening, Sacks found that catatonic patients have lives frozen in time. Their mind/body interactions became suspended in the eyes of society. They were always human but they lost their humanness in neurological disorder.

    Sacks is saying never give up on patients with neurological disorders. They are whole human beings. The neurologist’s job, as with all who practice medicine, is “first, do no harm”. “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat” illustrates how seriously Sacks took his calling.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Mitzie Gordon 07-28-16 Member Since 2016
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    "Review the man who mistook his wife for a hat"

    loved it. it was very clearly narrated and i could easily follow thr different stories.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    G Kay 07-27-16
    G Kay 07-27-16
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    "A book of passion and scientific insight"
    What did you love best about The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat: and Other Clinical Tales?

    The stories about the struggles of people and the way these stories are told: stories about our loved ones and not just 'research subjects'.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat: and Other Clinical Tales?

    The ending. The gloomy reality of people who are forgotten, or ignored.


    Have you listened to any of Jonathan Davis and Oliver Sacks (Introduction) ’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    No. This was my first book by Oliver Sacks, and Jonathan Davis' performance.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    paula b. 07-26-16
    paula b. 07-26-16
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    "Clinical but still understandable!"

    A fantastic narration by the professional reader.
    The tales were just enough information to be engaging. Clinical yet able to follow easily.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kat Cat 07-03-16
    Kat Cat 07-03-16 Member Since 2016
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    "Endless wonder"

    This is a book about bizarre neurological conditions. Although many of the cases involve tragically crippled individuals, this is anything but a morbid catalogue of illnesses. Neither is it a dry scientific tract. Every story is suffused with a great respect for the human potential, and with a sense of wonder at the unimaginable complexity of the brain and the mind. Reading this book, you appreciate how little understood, how mysterious the functioning of the mind still remains after decades of research. You feel an almost spiritual awe while reading this book. It's a great antidote to the depressingly mechanistic, "love is hormone a plus hormone b" view of human nature. Oliver Sacks also emphasizes the importance of art (especially music) to the human mind and to the recovery of many of his patients. (The topic of music from the point of view of neuroscience is specifically explored in Oliver Sacks's book "Musicophilia," which I also can't recommend enough!) This book is fascinating, enlightening, and in its own way, inspiring. It's also written in an engaging, accessible, poetic, and profoundly sympathetic manner. In the book, the author mentions a need for "romantic science," and that phrase is probably the best description for it. I dare anyone who claims that human behavior is governed by well understood mechanical processes to read Oliver Sacks and not feel their opinion challenged.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Hannah Monkiewicz 06-25-16 Member Since 2015
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    "Neuroscience at its best"

    Memories help us remember who we are. When we lose that, [who] are we? Fascinating book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Roope 06-16-16
    Roope 06-16-16 Member Since 2016
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    "A real classic"

    Still my favourite book after many years since I read it the first time. The stories range from funny to tragic to amazing and heart warming and you will be left wanting more when you finish.

    The narration is executed very well also. The narrator manages to give each character a unique and fitting voice that adds to the experience.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Towane 05-29-16
    Towane 05-29-16 Member Since 2014
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    "Very Good"

    Such an enjoyable and often moving book about patients dealing with neurological impairment. It makes you consciously aware of how hard their lives might be. In some cases, how beautiful it must also be to have their minds.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Vanessa Fernandez 05-25-16
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    "So fascinating !!!"

    For myself being in the field of psychology and working with individuals with the diagnoses discussed in tis book it was amazing! So intriguing and fascinating. A little dull voiced at times but still such amazing content.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Becky PA 05-25-16
    Becky PA 05-25-16 Member Since 2013

    Becky

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    "Highly technical"

    The examples of patient curiosities were fascinating but the level on which this was written made me wish I were reading it on a Kindle so I could get instant definitions of the vocabulary being used. There was a lot of "doctor talk" which makes it challenging for those not in the medical field.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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