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The Brain: Scientific American Mind | [Scientific American]

The Brain: Scientific American Mind

Studying how the mind and brain work sounds like it ought to be about as futile as trying to grab handfuls of air. Yet psychology, neuroscience and related fields have made amazing progress. This special issue of Scientific American reviews just a sliver of the discoveries that investigators from around the globe have made about the workings of our inner lives. The breadth of subjects tracks the vastness of thought.
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Audible Editor Reviews

This special edition of Scientific American provides an inside look at the brain through eight thought-provoking articles. The cover article examines the special "genius" that accompanies autism and other brain disorders. This issue's other topics include brain wiring versus freewill, compulsive television addictions, stress, anxiety, and the science behind the art of persuasion. Lucky for us, you don't need to be a brainiac to follow the narration. This performer uses relaxed pacing, and his tone is straightforward but engaged. Meanwhile, his enunciation tackles scientific vocabulary with ease.

Publisher's Summary

Studying how the mind and brain work sounds like it ought to be about as futile as trying to grab handfuls of air. Yet psychology, neuroscience and related fields have made amazing progress. This special issue of Scientific American reviews just a sliver of the discoveries that investigators from around the globe have made about the workings of our inner lives. The breadth of subjects tracks the vastness of thought. Several of our authors grapple with supremely tough questions: How does the gray matter in our skulls give rise to self-awareness? How can we have free will if our brains are bound by predictable mechanisms? How does memory work? Other articles describe how new genetic and biochemical findings elucidate causes of mental illness but also pose ethical quandaries. They illuminate mysteries of sensory perception. They explore how understanding of mental function can help us deal with mundane issues, such as solving problems creatively or making our arguments more persuasive. And a few celebrate the strange, unexpected beauties of the human condition.

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      Douglas Auburn, WA, United States 11-29-09
      Douglas Auburn, WA, United States 11-29-09 Member Since 2008

      College English professor who loves classic literature, psychology, neurology and hates pop trash like Twilight and Fifty Shades of Grey.

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      though nearly all of this material was better covered in DISCOVER: THE BRAIN in their fall edition. I wish audible carried DISCOVER, as it seems to me the more-informative and better-written magazine.

      2 of 2 people found this review helpful
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