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The Blind Watchmaker: Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe Without Design | [Richard Dawkins]

The Blind Watchmaker: Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe Without Design

The Blind Watchmaker, knowledgably narrated by author Richard Dawkins, is as prescient and timely a book as ever. The watchmaker belongs to the 18th-century theologian William Paley, who argued that just as a watch is too complicated and functional to have sprung into existence by accident, so too must all living things, with their far greater complexity, be purposefully designed. Charles Darwin's brilliant discovery challenged the creationist arguments; but only Richard Dawkins could have written this elegant riposte.
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Audible Editor Reviews

Richard Dawkins and his wife, actor Lalla Ward, give a highly entertaining read of Dawkins's 1986 critique of creationism, The Blind Watchmaker: Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe Without Design. The audiobook follows an updated edition of the book from 2006 and provides intricate explanations, by way of witty examples, of why random, infinitesimal gene changes over millions of years have produced us and the world we live in. Dawkins's writing contains a self-deprecating, dry sense of humor that comes to life as he reads his best-selling book. Alternating voices between Dawkins and Lalla Ward provides nice listening contrast while also setting apart examples, clarifications, and segments of greater detail. Dawkins and his wife live in a world that is perhaps more scientific on a daily basis than ours so the book takes great care to vary the delivery of information for greater emphasis and easy understanding.

Dawkins's goal in The Blind Watchmaker is to "remove by explaining" any doubt that anything but scientific fact is behind the origin of the universe. Just because something — like human beings or the universe — is complex does not mean that it cannot be explained. Dawkins works hard to help listeners understand the smaller-than-microscopic changes that evolved through staggering amounts of time, changes humans have a hard time intuitively comprehending. To paraphrase the author, do not draw conclusions from your own inability to understand something. The truth of Darwinism comes in its acceptance of physics, probability, and the unending march of time. Dawkins helps listeners out by using examples that are easier to grasp: for example, the evolution from wolves to domesticated dogs. Or how echo location in bats clearly shows the evolution of a trait necessary for survival of a species.

The Blind Watchmaker, read by the author and by Lalla Ward, is an example of an audiobook best listened to while not driving or operating anything requiring devoted attention. Dawkins calls upon us to think about complex concepts that are not necessarily part of daily life. Led by the author, The Blind Watchmkaer is a lively, humorous explanation of the seemingly mystical yet ultimately understandable maze of evolution that is our world. Along the way it is nice to know that a scientist such as Dawkins can, like us, forget to save information on his computer. Re-creation of his data simply leads to another example of probability and complexity that makes, as Dawkins reiterates, the circumstances of any of us being here surprisingly unique, but scientifically not unusual. —Carole Chouinard

Publisher's Summary

The Blind Watchmaker, knowledgably narrated by author Richard Dawkins and Lalla Ward, is as prescient and timely a book as ever. The watchmaker belongs to the 18th-century theologian William Paley, who argued that just as a watch is too complicated and functional to have sprung into existence by accident, so too must all living things, with their far greater complexity, be purposefully designed. Charles Darwin's brilliant discovery challenged the creationist arguments; but only Richard Dawkins could have written this elegant riposte. Natural selection - the unconscious, automatic, blind, yet essentially nonrandom process Darwin discovered - is the blind watchmaker in nature.

©1986, 1987, 1996 Richard Dawkins (P)2011 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"As readable and vigorous a defense of Darwinism as has been published since 1859. (The Economist)

"The best general account of evolution I have read in recent years." (E. O. Wilson, Professor in Entomology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University)

“Dawkins’s explanation of the evolutionary process continues to be timely and revelatory…This dual reading is an interesting model for a scientific text. It helps to clarify and emphasize points… this is a commendable production, and an excellent primer on how evolution works.” (AudoFile)

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  •  
    Ian C Robertson South Australia, Australia 02-16-12
    Ian C Robertson South Australia, Australia 02-16-12 Member Since 2010

    Eclectic mixer of books of my youth and ones I always meant to read, but didn't.

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    "Science Faction"

    Until relatively recently (the last decade, say) I thought that the only entertaining science was Science Fiction. Dawkins proved to me (yet again) that the best of fact is so much better than most of fiction. Of course, like any argument, one doesn't have to accept the conclusion to recognise a good argument. That I do accept the conclusion probably helped me enjoy this work, but I could have been the Bishop of Birmingham and, I hope, still have recognised a well structured, logical and persuasively argued thesis when heard this one.

    The argument is presented so that you don't need to understand all the science to enjoy the cut and thrust. And cut and thrust there most surely is! Dawkins is not afraid to tilt at apparently well respected opinion and, generally, he doesn't mince his words. I found this occasionally annoying when it seemed a bit mean spirited and an immediate reposte was not available from the butt of the comment, but I was able to get online and see if there was a response from, say, Gould to the criticism and this helped weather the frustration. That said, these flourishes were few and far between. Most of the criticism was obviously carefully considered and well reasoned. I particularly liked the examples. The bat was my favourite, and I did enjoy the bat with angel wings paradoy (even though I had to play it a few times to get the nuance - as I would have had to if I'd read it and had to re-read). Even though the paradoy wasa bit of a flourish, it wasn't personal (or it didn't appear to be so to me).

    As for the performance, I was abit apprehensive at first about Lalla Ward's role. Of course she is Dawkins wife, but I just wasn't sure a second voice was necessary, except to highlight quotations and examples. As the performance proceeded, I changed my mind. The change of reader added interest and, after all, Ms Ward has a wonderful voice. As for Dawkins, his infectious enthusiasm is literally bubbling up in his voice. I will never forget the fantastic end to Chapter 10 as a consequence. I am looking forward to listening to him read his Selfesh Gene (one of the first books that opened my mind to Science Faction).

    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    08-26-11
    08-26-11 Member Since 2009
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    "Heavy going but lots of information."

    I found Richard Dawkins' book very interesting but very heavy going for the 'lay-man'. It was swimming in scientific rhetoric and step by painful step analysis. All I wanted to do was cut to the chase! I will have to revisit the book again to be able to digest it further as my mind tended to fog over with the analysis of each minute detail. However I am glad I read it and am inspired to know more about the beginning of the world as we know it. I have long discarded the theory of "One god-like Being made the world in a week and then on Sunday he rested" One salient point was not touched - how the universe came into being in the first place?

    12 of 18 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Eric Vancouver, BC, Canada 07-18-11
    Eric Vancouver, BC, Canada 07-18-11
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    "Book of Enlightment"

    Richard Dawkins deserved so much credit of my curious and confused mind. He is so brilliant that this audiobook once you start listening you just can't stop. Lalla Ward is splendid as Richard Dawkins. I love listening to her voice. But of course Richard Dawkins is unparallel.He is like listening to my High School teacher in Physics who is also from England. He has this teacher or professor sounding nice and kind voice.This book was well written and carefully scripted not to offend the creationist believers.
    It will go down in history as the 21st century, the Age of Enlightment. Like Charles Darwin when his Theory of Evolution was first published in 1859. I was 13 years old when I started questioning about our creator. I had few catholic missionary friends when I was 13 yo and started asking questions of our creator. I was never satisfied of their answers. They all seems to have the same answer.."Faith"...a blind faith. It took me over 40 years to realize that I should not feel guilty that there's no such thing as Intelligent Design. Finally, all these clouds in my mind are 100% clear now. There's no such thing as Intelliget Design (ID) fun intented :) Bravo to Sir Richard Dawkins!

    25 of 43 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Gare&Sophia Alexandria, VA, United States 08-10-11
    Gare&Sophia Alexandria, VA, United States 08-10-11 Member Since 2007

    Private intellectual, writer, and retired academic. Currently R&D director for Gravitational Systems Engineering, Inc.

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    "Extremely informative, extremely dogmatic"

    As a student of historical religions, and science as religion I find Darwin extremely compelling, and logical. Dawkins on the other hand, has truly drunk the Kool-aid. I realize that the work is a bit dated, so some inaccuracies, for example his near ridicule of epi-genetics and Lemarkism, by focus on genes rather than switches. However, as a scientist I have learned that absolute certainty is only for mountebanks. I must say however, that I learned a lot, despite the fact that I have read most of Darwin's works, and many related texts. Unfortunately it is easy to get riled up by his everyone else is an idiot tone, and miss many of the startling insights of the work. I have a lot of respect for Mr.Dawkins, so I truly hope that this was more of a show than his true scientific point of view. And yet, all in all, I would recommend the book to all who have an interest.

    14 of 24 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ms. H 10-24-14
    Ms. H 10-24-14 Member Since 2013
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    "Terrific Narration"
    Where does The Blind Watchmaker rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    Excellent


    What other book might you compare The Blind Watchmaker to and why?

    Selfish Gene - same author - if you like the selfish gene you will like this too


    Which character – as performed by Richard Dawkins and Lalla Ward – was your favorite?

    n/a


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

    Unsightly Ticking Away


    Any additional comments?

    yes - the narration is excellent. This makes a huge difference. I am a fan of audiobooks yet have found that in some cases the book needs to be read instead because the voices are unpleasing - this is definitely not the case here. The narrators are delightful to listen to. This is an excellent book and I reccomend it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kevin Wyoming, Michigan, United States 09-07-14
    Kevin Wyoming, Michigan, United States 09-07-14 Member Since 2013

    Scientist, Atheist, Humanist, and Historian. I don't know everything, but I know enough to know if you're full of it!

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    "Dawkins Explains it All"
    Would you listen to The Blind Watchmaker again? Why?

    I have listened to The Blind Watchmaker six times and find something to take away each time!


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Blind Watchmaker?

    "Have you ever seen a Frelephant?"


    What about Richard Dawkins and Lalla Ward ’s performance did you like?

    I thought the switching back and forth worked really well.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I have found myself quoting this book numerous times.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mario Streger São Paulo / Brazil 09-05-14
    Mario Streger São Paulo / Brazil 09-05-14
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    "Too long"

    It is such a long book for the same information: evolution. It must be a great book for biologists as it gives rich examples of how evolution works and why. But it was not what I was looking for, unfortunately.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Steven Bloomfield 07-08-14 Member Since 2014
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    "Very good but some parts are hard to follow"
    Would you consider the audio edition of The Blind Watchmaker to be better than the print version?

    Haven't read the print edition but I think the confusing parts (probabilities and punctuated equilibrium) may have been easier to digest in print form.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No


    Any additional comments?

    Slightly difficult audiobook to listen to and actually retain. It lost me on the discussions of probabilities and also confused me until the very end of his discussion of punctuated equilibrium. Other than that it's still a good book for getting a grip on some of the more nuanced aspects of evolution by natural selection. But not for science beginners...

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    J.B. Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States 03-29-14
    J.B. Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States 03-29-14 Member Since 2004

    Economic litigation attorney. Reading, the arts and physical activity are all necessary.

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    "Outdated, pedantic; but not a mere Compendium"

    It certainly assembles all arguments against natural selection and provides indexed muliplle arguments to defeat creationist allegations, thinkings and biases. It just became too much of the same; repeating the failures of creationist logic and comparting it to dawrinistic proofs time and again and again. Although, for one who wants to master all thoughts on the subject it is complete. I am a darwinist, and still got tired of the logic versus the prayer. The presentation or reading thought was well done. The pass off between Dawkins and Ward made it easier but only for the first 70% of the read (listen).

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Alessandro Blacktown, Australia 03-22-14
    Alessandro Blacktown, Australia 03-22-14 Listener Since 2006
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    "The Professor makes difficult easy!"
    If you could sum up The Blind Watchmaker in three words, what would they be?

    Enjoyable, illuminating, essential


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Not applicable


    What about Richard Dawkins and Lalla Ward ’s performance did you like?

    The read very well and clearly and the text is beautifully written.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    A bit too thought provoking for one sitting, but I did not read anything else till it was finished.


    Any additional comments?

    Anyone unsure about the fact that IS evolution should definitely read it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 11-20 of 35 results PREVIOUS1234NEXT
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  • Jeremy
    Malvern Wells, United Kingdom
    8/10/11
    Overall
    "Sparkling with life!"

    This is a wonderful audiobook, literary full of wonder at the ingenuity of nature. It brought back memories for me as a student of being similarly stunned reading "The Selfish Gene". Early on in this book, Dawkins declares that he prefers the miraculous wonderment of William Paley, to the atheist who cannot see that anything needs explanation about the origins of complex life.

    Yet, in "The Blind Watchmaker", he makes the case with brilliant clarity, that the process that has given rise to the creative diversity and seeming design in nature is as much a physical nonrandom process as the sifting of pebbles from sand on a beach. This book explains the principles of Evolution with sparkling clarity.

    The audiobook version is read alternately by Richard Dawkins and his wife, Lalla Ward, and initially I found this change odd. However, within a chapter, I came to enjoy the conterpoint of male and female reading voices. It was kind of soothing, and a great innovation. I look forward to other audiobooks being read in this way.. One effect of this was a feeling of familiarity with the author. I came to admire his quest for the Truth, and his contempt for those who would fudge the difficult questions and the evidence to preserve their old beliefs.

    And so, there is the unavoidable "G" question. Paley's God is clearly shown by Dawkins to be as redundant to the process of evolution, as to the apparent motions of the planets. Yet, given (possibly) infinite universes, with N dimensions of space and time, one might speculate on the evolution of some transcendent intelligence pulling on our strings in the present!

    Perhaps Paley's God too can still be glimpsed in the elegance and power of the principles of evolution itself? But then, as Darwin saw in the ichneumon wasp, there is then the problem of theodicy. After listening to this book, I was left with a vivid impression both of the sheer creative intelligence of Nature, and the cost in pain and death of previous generations.

    9 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • Matthew
    United Kingdom
    11/16/11
    Overall
    "Read the Selfish Gene instead"

    The Blind Watchmaker is an interesting listen. As with the Selfish Gene, the duo of Dawkins and Lalla Ward makes for excellent narration. It covers a great deal of interesting material, and if you haven't listened to the Selfish Gene, I recommend it.

    The premise of the book is a rebuttal of the Watchmaker argument for an intelligent designer. The theory of evolution itself is an excellent rebuttal of most of this argument, so I was hoping this book might concentrate on the principal weakness of arguments for life without design: the origin of life. Instead, this is covered in a part of one chapter, and in no great depth. I was left disappointed.

    The Selfish Gene is an excellent introduction to evolution, and mostly covers the same topics as Blind Watchmaker. The Blind Watchmaker has more examples, but they're really going over much the same ground.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Balor of the Evil Eye
    Éire
    2/14/14
    Overall
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    Story
    "Intelligent design my rear!"

    Yet another compelling presentation by Dawkins,The Blind Watchmaker tackles the idea, perhaps most prominently promoted by Creationists, that intelligent design has informed how humans gained much of the form with which we are all so familiar. As ever Dawkins rubbishes his detractors with his practiced aplomb, demanding that they recognise the obvious truth behind his theories, or admit that they just don't believe in a scientific approach to answering questions about human development.
    Perhaps the most popular organ for those espousing the intelligent design hypothesis, the eye, is singled out by Dawkins for treatment, treatment that could leave few listeners with the impression that his thesis lacks substance.

    As with his other titles, the narration by both himself and Lalla Ward is competently performed and easy to listen to. The fact that Dawkins gets so exercised about certain topics comes through in the narration, and is actually a bit of a bonus, especially if you are used to rather flat readers presenting scientific topics.

    A good book. Buy it after The Selfish Gene.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Y. Doza
    UK
    7/11/13
    Overall
    Performance
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    "Darwinian Evolution as a religion"
    What made the experience of listening to The Blind Watchmaker the most enjoyable?

    The narration by the author and Lalla Ward makes for a good combination.
    The chapters are mostly interesting - with a few over the top explanations.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Darwin - because he is right - only he is right - all the rest are wrong - according to Dawkins - Darwin's prophet.


    What about Richard Dawkins and Lalla Ward ’s performance did you like?

    The split in reading the material.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No, it requires digestion time - to comprehend the ideas presented.


    Any additional comments?

    While I am convinced by most arguments in the book, the zealous following of Darwin - and rebuttal of all other evolutionary views smacks a bit like religion - my god is the only god!.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Anders
    Denmark
    7/13/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Makes you think"
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    Some arguments but that is rather a silly thing, as I am not the author, and do not have the privilege to do so. So I would leave it and both enjoy to agree and disagree.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Blind Watchmaker?

    The general picture, in which arguments are presented.


    What does Richard Dawkins and Lalla Ward bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

    Firstly, the author's voice gives the correct connotations, which you might skip, miss or change in your own personal reading. Secondly, they have good reading voices that brings the book to a level, where you do not feel like falling asleep, which I find to be the strive of any good reader.


    Could you see The Blind Watchmaker being made into a movie or a TV series? Who would the stars be?

    No, but a documentary/debate program, though I find that there is a lot of these things around.


    Any additional comments?

    Even though I do not agree with all arguments I, as an Atheist, found it very useful and good for both mind and relaxation.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Gustav
    London, United Kingdom
    8/18/12
    Overall
    "Dry but good overview of evolution"

    This is a very dry, slow and methodological overview of evolution. It takes its time to make its points, and it does so convincingly, but it isn't a fast and fun book. Neither does it have to be, if you have a bit of patience.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Adrian
    Tralee, Ireland
    11/14/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Some good analysis but lacks vision"
    If this book wasn’t for you, who do you think might enjoy it more?

    The author is good at analyzing the work of other writers and is able to produce well though out arguments for or against each theory. However I found it frustrating that any of his own original concepts and examples were shallow and lacked imagination. In fact he falls into the traps he warns against. In many instances he extrapolates from what he sees on earth now and not from what all possibilities might produce. When he postulates on the existence of life on other planets he suggests that we should have received radio signals. This assumes that at some point in the evolution of life on another planet a human type brain is probable.
    I would recommend this book to people who are struggling with the concept of evolution. I would also recommend it to anyone who believes that life as we know it could only come about as a result of an all knowing entity.


    What will your next listen be?

    Not yet decided.


    What three words best describe Richard Dawkins and Lalla Ward ’s voice?

    Work well together


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Blind Watchmaker?

    I would change the name. Even a blind watchmaker will act with intent and yet he goes to great length to point out that evolution does not.

    I would remove any section of the book where the author attempts to extrapolate from the work of others to give us his beliefs on a topic.

    I would remove any of the statements he makes which make assumptions for the ability of human beings to understand a particular concept and ask the author to replace with "I find it difficult to imagine, understand, picture" or " some people find it difficult to ".

    From his attempts to draw conclusions on certain concepts it appears he is expressing his struggle to visualize and assuming everyone else has the same difficulty.


    Any additional comments?

    I agree with his analysis of the work of other authors.

    1 of 5 people found this review helpful
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