The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security Audiobook | Kevin Mitnick | Audible.com
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The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security | [Kevin Mitnick]

The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security

The world's most infamous hacker offers an insider's view of the low-tech threats to high-tech security. Kevin Mitnick's exploits as a cyber-desperado and fugitive form one of the most exhaustive FBI manhunts in history and have spawned dozens of articles, books, films, and documentaries. Since his release from federal prison, in 1998, Mitnick has turned his life around and established himself as one of the most sought-after computer security experts worldwide.
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Publisher's Summary

The world's most infamous hacker offers an insider's view of the low-tech threats to high-tech security. Kevin Mitnick's exploits as a cyber-desperado and fugitive form one of the most exhaustive FBI manhunts in history and have spawned dozens of articles, books, films, and documentaries. Since his release from federal prison, in 1998, Mitnick has turned his life around and established himself as one of the most sought-after computer security experts worldwide. Now, in The Art of Deception, the world's most notorious hacker gives new meaning to the old adage, "It takes a thief to catch a thief."

Focusing on the human factors involved with information security, Mitnick explains why all the firewalls and encryption protocols in the world will never be enough to stop a savvy grifter intent on rifling a corporate database or an irate employee determined to crash a system. With the help of many fascinating true stories of successful attacks on business and government, he illustrates just how susceptible even the most locked-down information systems are to a slick con artist impersonating an IRS agent.

Narrating from the points of view of both the attacker and the victims, he explains why each attack was so successful and how it could have been prevented in an engaging and highly readable style reminiscent of a true-crime novel. And, perhaps most importantly, Mitnick offers advice for preventing these types of social engineering hacks through security protocols, training programs, and manuals that address the human element of security.

Download the accompanying reference guide.

©2003 Kevin D. Mitnick; (P)2009 Audible, Inc.

What Members Say

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Performance
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  •  
    Amazon Customer Pittsburgh, PA USA 12-05-09
    Amazon Customer Pittsburgh, PA USA 12-05-09 Listener Since 2003
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
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    10
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    Overall
    "Too long and"

    I enjoyed a few of the tidbits of information provided in the overly long listen, e.g., you can't alway trust Caller ID, but I was disappointed by the author's tone of the book. I was expecting a more thoughtful analysis of the ways security can be enhanced and how hackers and information thieves work. What I received was a less than insightful book by a man who is obviously still proud of his criminal expoits, regardless of the harm he certainly caused.

    2 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Robert Towson, MD, United States 03-15-11
    Robert Towson, MD, United States 03-15-11 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
    7
    ratings
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    4
    4
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
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    Overall
    "Repetitive"

    The first three or four examples of computer hacking achieved by fooling people into divulging seemingly innocent information were interesting, but the rest of the book is more of the same. I couldn't force myself to listen to more than the first third.

    1 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    William Davenport, IA, United States 10-06-10
    William Davenport, IA, United States 10-06-10 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
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    35
    1
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    Overall
    "Terribly boring"

    I could only listen to the first couple of hours. This reminded me of a term paper where the student is overly verbose to extend the paper to the required length.

    1 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael 11-18-09
    Michael 11-18-09 Member Since 2003
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
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    4
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    Overall
    "duped"

    this book is a deception. its completely anecdotal. don't waste your credit on this one.

    2 of 13 people found this review helpful
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