We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security | [Kevin Mitnick]

The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security

The world's most infamous hacker offers an insider's view of the low-tech threats to high-tech security. Kevin Mitnick's exploits as a cyber-desperado and fugitive form one of the most exhaustive FBI manhunts in history and have spawned dozens of articles, books, films, and documentaries. Since his release from federal prison, in 1998, Mitnick has turned his life around and established himself as one of the most sought-after computer security experts worldwide.
Regular Price:$20.72
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

The world's most infamous hacker offers an insider's view of the low-tech threats to high-tech security. Kevin Mitnick's exploits as a cyber-desperado and fugitive form one of the most exhaustive FBI manhunts in history and have spawned dozens of articles, books, films, and documentaries. Since his release from federal prison, in 1998, Mitnick has turned his life around and established himself as one of the most sought-after computer security experts worldwide. Now, in The Art of Deception, the world's most notorious hacker gives new meaning to the old adage, "It takes a thief to catch a thief."

Focusing on the human factors involved with information security, Mitnick explains why all the firewalls and encryption protocols in the world will never be enough to stop a savvy grifter intent on rifling a corporate database or an irate employee determined to crash a system. With the help of many fascinating true stories of successful attacks on business and government, he illustrates just how susceptible even the most locked-down information systems are to a slick con artist impersonating an IRS agent.

Narrating from the points of view of both the attacker and the victims, he explains why each attack was so successful and how it could have been prevented in an engaging and highly readable style reminiscent of a true-crime novel. And, perhaps most importantly, Mitnick offers advice for preventing these types of social engineering hacks through security protocols, training programs, and manuals that address the human element of security.

Download the accompanying reference guide.

©2003 Kevin D. Mitnick; (P)2009 Audible, Inc.

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.6 (468 )
5 star
 (120)
4 star
 (149)
3 star
 (133)
2 star
 (43)
1 star
 (23)
Overall
3.7 (336 )
5 star
 (100)
4 star
 (92)
3 star
 (104)
2 star
 (26)
1 star
 (14)
Story
3.7 (337 )
5 star
 (102)
4 star
 (92)
3 star
 (93)
2 star
 (31)
1 star
 (19)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Nathaniel K. Thompson 04-10-15

    nate

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    88
    9
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Liked ghost in the wires more"
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    I just could not get into this book like I did Ghost in the wires, i listened to it twice and the second time wasnt any easier than the first, Its hard to explain


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    Yes


    Did The Art of Deception inspire you to do anything?

    No


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Russ Salt Lake City, UT, United States 03-27-15
    Russ Salt Lake City, UT, United States 03-27-15
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    8
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Interesting tales, but it's almost like a textbook"

    The accounts given in this book are pretty amazing - they closely resemble the accounts given in Mitnick's "Ghost in the Wires", which are also interesting. The main point of this book, however, is that no organization with human beings as members is ever completely safe. While it lists numerous ways to help mitigate some of the issues, we're still never going to be able to secure anything completely.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    William O'Neal Alexandria, VA 03-24-15
    William O'Neal Alexandria, VA 03-24-15 Member Since 2014

    Computer & Mac Guy

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    12
    4
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Old but nonetheless good information"

    Old but nonetheless good information. Very repetitive at the end. Could have condensed chapter 16 greatly. Helpful though even in today's world.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    KerPow Mapleton, UT 03-03-15
    KerPow Mapleton, UT 03-03-15 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    0
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    14
    11
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Good Psychology, Bad Narration"
    Any additional comments?

    This book is essentially a series of vignettes about people who con other people into giving away personal information. The other reviewers may be right that the technology is outdated, but the psychology isn't. I've enjoyed it, even though it does seem to hammer in the same points over and over again.

    I don't think the narrator is well-paired with the book. I don't think his voice is bad, exactly. Just that it might be more suitable for fiction. Sometimes, I felt like he felt he was reading out of a phone book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    john Battery Point, Australia 01-24-15
    john Battery Point, Australia 01-24-15 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    24
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    36
    15
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Required reading"

    If you have a leadership role in security this is a book you need to read.

    The first 80% are illuminating and entertaining case studies. Great to listen to.

    The last portion are policy guidelines and if you are going to be in a position to deploy them get a print version for that part.

    Performance is of the normal high standard Audible is famous for.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    M D Baxter 01-14-13
    M D Baxter 01-14-13 Member Since 2015

    mike2400

    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    52
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Well Written and Well Performed"
    What did you love best about The Art of Deception?

    This book is a great book for anyone who wants to know about social engineering. It is a must read/listen for any corp security manager or IT or IS manager.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    n/a


    Have you listened to any of Nick Sullivan’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    n/a


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Marshall 11-23-12
    Marshall 11-23-12
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    3
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Required reading for computer users!"

    This book should be required reading for EVERYONE who uses a computer! Social Engineering defeats every security technology every day!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    douglas wheaton, MN, United States 11-14-11
    douglas wheaton, MN, United States 11-14-11
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    46
    3
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Gilligan"

    One of the best books I've read in along time. A must read for anyone that works as a secretary or around computers. If you thought your information was safe it's a good way to learn how susceptible we are to freely giving it to others without even realizing it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 12-05-09 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    10
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Too long and"

    I enjoyed a few of the tidbits of information provided in the overly long listen, e.g., you can't alway trust Caller ID, but I was disappointed by the author's tone of the book. I was expecting a more thoughtful analysis of the ways security can be enhanced and how hackers and information thieves work. What I received was a less than insightful book by a man who is obviously still proud of his criminal expoits, regardless of the harm he certainly caused.

    3 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Robert 03-15-11
    Robert 03-15-11
    HELPFUL VOTES
    8
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    4
    4
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Repetitive"

    The first three or four examples of computer hacking achieved by fooling people into divulging seemingly innocent information were interesting, but the rest of the book is more of the same. I couldn't force myself to listen to more than the first third.

    1 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 11-20 of 22 results PREVIOUS123NEXT

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.