We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
The Alchemy of Air: A Jewish Genius, a Doomed Tycoon, and the Scientific Discovery That Fed the World but Fueled the Rise of Hitler | [Thomas Hager]

The Alchemy of Air: A Jewish Genius, a Doomed Tycoon, and the Scientific Discovery That Fed the World but Fueled the Rise of Hitler

At the dawn of the 20th century, humanity was facing global disaster. Mass starvation, long predicted for the fast-growing population, was about to become a reality. A call went out to the worlds scientists to find a solution. This is the story of the two enormously gifted, fatally flawed men who found it: the brilliant, self-important Fritz Haber and the reclusive, alcoholic Carl Bosch. Together they discovered a way to make bread out of air, built city-sized factories, controlled world markets, and saved millions of lives.
Regular Price:$24.95
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

A sweeping history of tragic genius, cutting-edge science, and the discovery that changed billions of lives - including your own.

At the dawn of the 20th century, humanity was facing global disaster. Mass starvation, long predicted for the fast-growing population, was about to become a reality. A call went out to the world's scientists to find a solution. This is the story of the two enormously gifted, fatally flawed men who found it: the brilliant, self-important Fritz Haber and the reclusive, alcoholic Carl Bosch.

Together they discovered a way to make bread out of air, built city-sized factories, controlled world markets, and saved millions of lives. Their invention continues to feed us today; without it, more than two billion people would starve.

But their epochal triumph came at a price we are still paying. The Haber-Bosch process was also used to make the gunpowder and high explosives that killed millions during the two world wars. Both men were vilified during their lives; both, disillusioned and disgraced, died tragically. Today we face the other unintended consequences of their discovery - massive nitrogen pollution and a growing pandemic of obesity.

The Alchemy of Air is the extraordinary, previously untold story of two master scientists who saved the world only to lose everything and of the unforseen results of a discovery that continue to shape our lives in the most fundamental and dramatic of ways.

©2008 Thomas Hager (P)2010 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"This scientific adventure spans two world wars and every cell in your body." (Discover magazine)

“I know of few other books that provide the general reader with a better portrait of chemistry as the most useful of sciences, and I intend to recommend it to scientists and non-scientists alike.” (The Journal of Chemical Education)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.4 (748 )
5 star
 (407)
4 star
 (252)
3 star
 (69)
2 star
 (14)
1 star
 (6)
Overall
4.5 (611 )
5 star
 (383)
4 star
 (166)
3 star
 (49)
2 star
 (9)
1 star
 (4)
Story
4.3 (614 )
5 star
 (312)
4 star
 (216)
3 star
 (60)
2 star
 (18)
1 star
 (8)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    MidwestGeek 07-25-14
    MidwestGeek 07-25-14
    HELPFUL VOTES
    232
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    429
    96
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    13
    14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Science, technology, personalities entangled."

    I like Hager as a science writer. I had not known much about the Haber-Bosch process or its developers. It illustrates that, as usual, scientific and technological progress is a double-edged sword with potential for both good and evil. Of the two main characters, I found Bosch the engineer/businessman to be the more admirable, however brilliant a chemist Haber may have been. The narration is good, except that certain scientific or German words are completely mispronounced.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Calliope 01-28-14
    Calliope 01-28-14
    HELPFUL VOTES
    288
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    214
    209
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    9
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "fascinating subject I didn't realize until now"

    I'll be another reviewer to say "how did I not know this?" ! There is so much in this book that should be well known but simply isn't, I was astounded. I'd never thought about how chemical fertilizers were discovered - about how difficult and ground-breaking it was, and how desperately the world needed it. I'd never thought about the geopolitical importance of fertilizers (organic and chemically created), though it was huge and had significant effects on world affairs. And that doesn't even get into the close association between chemical fertilizers and explosives/munitions.

    Actually, the title of the book is a bit of a misnomer: This book is really about the work, life, and discoveries of two men - Fritz Haber and Carl Bosch. It starts with nitrogen and the need for fertilizer and continues through the discovery of the process and creation of chemical fertilizers, but it is much more. While Haber invented the original process and Bosch created the means and methods for making it practical on a large scale, it continues to follow the lives of the two men past the time when the Haber-Bosch process was novel (and unique to Germany) and through the rise of Hitler to the second world war. How the mechanisms Bosch used were turned to making synthetic fuel and rubber, how the chemical company BASF grew to be a part of the chemical giant IG Farben (most notable now for creating the Zyklon B gas used in the Holocaust), and how the changing fate of Jews in Germany in the 1930s affected both Haber and Bosch.

    Both men were, by all accounts, devastated to see how their scientific discoveries intended to feed the world and support Germany after WWI were used to fuel the rise of a martial state with Hitler and his anti-Semitic policies. Haber was Jewish born and had been a proud veteran of World War I, and Bosch was heartbroken and shocked to see so many of his fellow scientists minimized and tossed out of their jobs because of their religion, and to see his inventions used to fuel and supply that process. Ultimately, those things led to their ill health and sad deaths - Haber in Switzerland on his way to Palestine, and Bosch in Germany.

    Sadly, the narration was merely adequate, and it's the weak point of this audiobook.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brandon S. Gillette Lawrence, KS 12-27-12
    Brandon S. Gillette Lawrence, KS 12-27-12 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    6
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    21
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "I can't believe I didn't know any of this"
    What did you like best about this story?

    This is the best kind of non-fiction. It is human-focused, so it organizes the story around a few key people, but it is about wide-scale events of world-changing importance. There are many non-fiction books that seek to deliver information and to do so in an accessible way. Most of these don't figure out how to deliver the information in a compelling way. Still more of these are interesting if you're already interested in the topic, but not otherwise. This book is compelling, and should be interesting to anyone who wants to know something of critical importance to the world. I am a fairly well-read person who is generally scientifically and historically literate, and I have no idea why I knew basically nothing of the subject of this book. So many facts about the first two world wars come into focus thanks to the information in this book. Bravo.


    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mann 06-26-12
    Mann 06-26-12

    Hi. My name is Mann & I am an Enterprise Communications expert by profession. I have always loved reading books and primarily enjoy books on Finance, Science & Technology and History. I do hear an occasional Fictional book though I prefer to read them instead.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    54
    7
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A Fascinating & Engaging Book"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes. All those who love reading about science and its impact on our society will enjoy this book a lot. Very well researched book. The best part is the interweaving of the human side and scientific side of the story. Thomas Hager is an exceptional storyteller who brings to context different historical events and their reverberations on our contemporary life.

    I always hated Chemistry as a kid and now I feel, if only I had read this book when I was young, my perception of the subject and its relevance would have been way different.


    What other book might you compare The Alchemy of Air to and why?

    Most Human Human. The books is extremely beautiful series of essays on Computing and Artificial Intelligence. Its another realm of science presented with its larger role in the society and meta-philosophy. The book though gets more exciting towards the latter half.


    What about Adam Verner’s performance did you like?

    Awesome performance by Adam.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    Follies by Geniuses.


    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Paul California 06-13-12
    Paul California 06-13-12 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
    5
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    7
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Facinating Work of Industrial History"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    This book should be required reading/listening in schools in my opinion. It explains how we got to where we are today in terms of World population growth and it also explains how the two world wars went on for the length of time they did.

    I really enjoyed this book both from the science content and from the detailed descriptions of the key people involved in this discovery. I wish there were more books like this availabe


    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Martin Kansas City, MO, United States 05-03-12
    Martin Kansas City, MO, United States 05-03-12 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    8
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    7
    4
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great history"

    One of the best books ever! The subject was very interesting and the narration was excellent.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Benoibe New Orleans, LA, United States 05-12-13
    Benoibe New Orleans, LA, United States 05-12-13 Member Since 2010

    Audio Addict! Usually listening to History these days. Love Will Durant most of all authors!

    HELPFUL VOTES
    1636
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    497
    210
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    775
    57
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Amazing story! Perfect audiobook!"

    I finished listening to this author's first book, Demon Under a Microscope, just yesterday. I immediately went online to see if he had written anything else. I definitely recommend starting with Demon Under a Microscope first, as the stories are somewhat connected. I think you get a better understanding if what life was like at the time of this story.

    This is another EXCEPTIONAL story from Thomas Hager. He gives the reader a rare point of view. I listened to both of his books straight through. (Honestly I think Hager could make anything interesting!) Hager is a truly gifted author, who tells each story with a fresh and unusual perspective. I loved the way he presented the main protagonists, with their flaws and disappointments.
    Ultimately, this book is about the unintended consequences of the work of two important German scientists, from WWI to WWII, and how things just don't turn out like people intend or expect.

    Great narration. Highly recommended!

    6 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cody 07-28-15
    Cody 07-28-15 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
    4
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    9
    7
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Slow to start but worth the wait"

    At first I wasn't pulled in but after the 3rd chapter I couldn't put it down. I learned more then I thought I would from this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jim 06-12-15
    Jim 06-12-15
    HELPFUL VOTES
    0
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    3
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great narrative. Bogged down at beginning and end"

    This is a good book for anyone interested in the history of science or of the firms BASF and IG Farbin. It tells the story of the struggle to synthesize nitrogen for fertilizer (and explosives) and the story of two men (Haber - the pure scientist who figured out how to do it - and Bosch - the scientist/engineer/businessman who figured out how to optimize that process and make it cost effective). The story incorporates mini-stories of early application and sources of fertilizer (mostly in Peru and Chile), how BASF transformed from a cloth dye company to the largest chemical company in the world (by sales), poison gas development in WWI, how IG Farbin (the German chemical conglomerate) was formed, and the tangential story of synthetic gasoline that powered a lot of the Third Reich.
    The Alchemy of Air's story easily flows across industries, people and history. I think this is one of those things that looks easiest to do when it is done very well - but weaving this kind of tale isn't very easy, so Thomas Hagan does a great job.
    I got bogged down in the beginning and put this audio book down for months because it just didn't grab me. When I picked up the story, it took off. The problem was probably me and not the book, but was my experience nevertheless. Similarly, I started getting bored over the last 30-45 minutes as the story(ies) wound down.
    Overall, a great book - just hold on if things feel a little slow, it will pick up again and you will be happy with the overall experience.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Thomas 05-07-15
    Thomas 05-07-15
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "There are few that put together the synergy of sci"
    What made the experience of listening to The Alchemy of Air the most enjoyable?

    There are few that put together the synergy of science, commerce, and their places in history so well as Thomas Hager. I bought Demon Under the Microscope at a sale price, and consider one of the best reads in decades. Alchemy of Air is equally absorbing.

    I have taught physics and engineering at university for years, and I try and make history and commerce part of the background in my courses. Personalities and economic pressures do shape the course of technology and as Mr. Hager points out, not always for the better. I hope Mr. Hager continues these pursuits, and might consider exploring the threads of more physics, chemistry, and engineering.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.