We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
Call anytime(888) 283-5051
Scientific American, August 2001 | [Scientific American]

Scientific American, August 2001

In this issue of Scientific American, computer modeling and the decoded human genome, machine procreation, ordinary PCs lending helping hands to each other, one doctor's doubts about the link between HIV and AIDS, and more.
Regular Price:$6.95
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

In this issue of Scientific American, the cover article, "Cybernetic Cells," discusses how computer modeling is an absolute must when it comes to deciphering all the data from the decoded human genome. W. Wayne Gibbs reports that cells are so complex even a supercomputer model might not deliver perfect results - but it will still lead to breathroughs. Machines begetting machines? Well, birds do it and bees do it. Moshe Sipper and James Reggia report in "Go Forth and Replicate" that the latest computer simulations suggest machines could do it too. Scientists have found a cheaper way to solve tremendously difficult computational problems: connect ordinary PCs so that they can work together. In the second part of the series on Next Generation Supercomputers, William Hargrove, Forest Hoffman and Thomas Sterling explain how a low-tech approach results in "The Do-It-Yourself Supercomputer." The scientific method involves making hypotheses, testing them and getting peer review. Rarely does it result in ostracism. Virologist Peter Deusberg has doubts about the link between HIV and AIDS. Now, reports W. Wayne Gibbs, Duesberg is taking on cancer. Who says venture capitalism is dead? Certainly the CIA doesn't think so. Daniel Dupont reports in "The Company's Company."

Want more Scientific American? You can listen to previous issues by clicking on under periodicals.

©2001 Scientific American

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.0 (1 )
5 star
 (0)
4 star
 (0)
3 star
 (1)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Overall
0 (0 )
5 star
 (0)
4 star
 (0)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Story
0 (0 )
5 star
 (0)
4 star
 (0)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Performance


There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.