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Quiet Audiobook

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking

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Audible Editor Reviews

Why we think it's Essential - If you’ve ever felt guilty for wanting to stay home, instead of attending a party, or wish you could be more vocal and outgoing at work, this book is for you. Empowering and informative, Quiet is a revolutionary look at the power of introverts – and the strengths they contribute to society – through the lens of such unassuming leaders as Bill Gates and Rosa Parks. Narrator Kathe Mazur gets the pacing just right, leaving introverts and extroverts alike the time to listen and understand Cain’s power-packed gems. —Diana M.

Publisher's Summary

At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams. Although they are often labeled "quiet," it is to introverts that we owe many of the great contributions to society--from van Gogh’s sunflowers to the invention of the personal computer.

Passionately argued, impressively researched, and filled with indelible stories of real people, Quiet shows how dramatically we undervalue introverts, and how much we lose in doing so. Taking the reader on a journey from Dale Carnegie’s birthplace to Harvard Business School, from a Tony Robbins seminar to an evangelical megachurch, Susan Cain charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal in the 20th century and explores its far-reaching effects. She talks to Asian-American students who feel alienated from the brash, backslapping atmosphere of American schools. She questions the dominant values of American business culture, where forced collaboration can stand in the way of innovation, and where the leadership potential of introverts is often overlooked. And she draws on cutting-edge research in psychology and neuroscience to reveal the surprising differences between extroverts and introverts.

Perhaps most inspiring, she introduces us to successful introverts--from a witty, high-octane public speaker who recharges in solitude after his talks, to a record-breaking salesman who quietly taps into the power of questions. Finally, she offers invaluable advice on everything from how to better negotiate differences in introvert-extrovert relationships to how to empower an introverted child to when it makes sense to be a "pretend extrovert."

This extraordinary book has the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how introverts see themselves.

©2012 Susan Cain (P)2012 Random House

What the Critics Say

"An intriguing and potentially life-altering examination of the human psyche that is sure to benefit both introverts and extroverts alike." (Kirkus)

"Cain gives excellent portraits of a number of introverts and shatters misconceptions. Cain consistently holds the reader’s interest by presenting individual profiles, looking at places dominated by extroverts (Harvard Business School) and introverts (a West Coast retreat center), and reporting on the latest studies. Her diligence, research, and passion for this important topic has richly paid off.-" (Publishers Weekly)

"An intelligent and often surprising look at what makes us who we are." (Booklist)

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  •  
    Dave Nelson Marietta, GA, United States 02-12-12
    Dave Nelson Marietta, GA, United States 02-12-12 Member Since 2014
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    "Quiet May Have Changed My Life"
    What made the experience of listening to Quiet the most enjoyable?

    I have always known that I am an introvert, but this book taught me so much about myself that I don’t know where to begin. This book really blew me away and I look forward to sharing it with a lot of friends and co-workers.


    38 of 43 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mark Raglan, New Zealand 06-05-16
    Mark Raglan, New Zealand 06-05-16 Member Since 2015

    I love listening to books when cycling, paddleboarding, etc but I press pause when I need to concentrate. Its safer & I don't lose the plot!

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    "Embrace your shyness"

    I struggled with this audiobook. I’m interested in the subject of introvertism versus extrovertism but this book didn’t really give me any particularly valuable information. It’s good in the sense that it says it’s OK to be an introvert, and that introverts are often better than extroverts at many things, so if you are an introvert, relax and enjoy it. She also reassures introverts that if you want to play the extrovert game and excel at things such as public speaking, you can do this by applying yourself to the task. An introvert can learn how to behave like an extrovert.

    I feel like I’m a mixture of an introvert and an extrovert. Everyone laughs when I say I’m introverted or that I’m shy, but it’s true. I hate making small-talk, I avoid acquaintances in supermarkets because of my dread of having to have a small-talk conversation. I really like doing lots of things on my own (especially listening to audiobooks!). For me, the only way I can tolerate parties is if I apply large doses of beer – 'extrovertism in a glass'. But I’m very happy teaching a class of students and I enjoy being the centre of attention in some other contexts too. I get a buzz off entertaining or enlightening people, and I won the school drama prize. So, as you Americans might say: ‘Go Figure’.

    The author mentions, in passing, an ‘ambivert’: a person with an intriguing mixture of introvert and extrovert traits – but to my frustration she never goes on to develop this further. There is also some bogus pseudo-science in this book which put me off, when she analyses the character of Moses to determine if he was introverted. I realise this might score me a couple of ‘unhelpful’ ratings from the religiously inclined, but how can you analyse the personality traits of a person so lost in the mists of time, and who may even be a completely mythical figure? For me, this tarnishes the scientific rigor of the work.

    So, the book was a reasonably good listen but it left some questions unanswered and it didn’t fully satisfy me.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer Fountain Inn, SC, United States 02-08-12
    Amazon Customer Fountain Inn, SC, United States 02-08-12 Member Since 2015

    Alpha Wolf

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    "Really great information about personalities."
    What made the experience of listening to Quiet the most enjoyable?

    The thoughtful and insightful explanations of introverts and extroverts, and the examples of each given.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Quiet?

    The realization that introverts are not inferior as our culture would have us believe.


    What does Kathe Mazur bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    She remarkably brings the author to life to me.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Yes.


    Any additional comments?

    I want to learn more along these lines since listening to this book.

    19 of 22 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Annie M. 09-02-12
    Annie M. 09-02-12 Member Since 2009

    Say something about yourself!

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    "Life Changing"
    What did you love best about Quiet?

    I bought this book to better understand how I could support our exceedingly introverted son. What surprised me is how much I learned about myself, as well. I learned why I am always so utterly pole-axed after even a brief lunch with friends--and how to better manage my energy. And I got wonderful insights into my son's "quiet" and also learned, as hped, how to support him. After reading this book, I feel like being an introert is very much like having a hidden super power.

    I have bought ten copies of this book to hand out to friends and family--and every single person has been amazed at what a fabulous book this is.

    If you have a relationship with someone who is on the quiet side, this book will explain to you what is going on in that quiet person's head and heart.

    If you are a quiet person yourself, you will find this book to be empowering. The stuidies cited will make you feel wise, will make you grateful to be the introverted soul that you are. You will feel really good aout yourself and want to read it over and over again.


    What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

    With all the interviews with successful introverts, those who have managed to come out of their shells somewhat, yet still retain their core quiet nature, I felt for the first time in my life that I was not alone. And that the quiet me, who is truly content to be alone for days on end, who would rather read than go to a party, who gets exhausted when pushed into the madding crowd--all that is okay. In fact, those introverted qualities are to be cherished and nurtured.

    The book also helped me gain some insight into my son's inner world. He is far more introverted than me, bordering on social anziety. QUIET offered sound advice on hleping him find some balance and encouraging him to push himself in a healthy, nurturing way.


    Any additional comments?

    I wish every teacher, every CEO in the world had to read this book. It would open their eyes to the value and wisdom of the quieter people in the world.

    If you are involved with a QUIET person, or are a parent to a quiet person, this book will really help you understand why your true love/son/daughter/ parent/friend is the way he/she is--and by the end of the book, you will look at that person with an entirely new, and appreciative eye. You will wish you were QUIET, too.

    8 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Alexander RICHMOND, VA, United States 03-03-12
    Alexander RICHMOND, VA, United States 03-03-12 Member Since 2013
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    "Very good listen"
    Would you listen to Quiet again? Why?

    Ms. Cain is so insightful. The reader (not sure if it's the author) is one of the best I've heard.


    What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

    This is a fantastic, incredibly well-written collection of the science behind introversion.


    8 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Bradley Colorado Springs, CO, United States 01-31-12
    Bradley Colorado Springs, CO, United States 01-31-12 Member Since 2008
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    "Really Very Good, Mostly!!!!"

    This is actually quite an inspirational book. I have listened to quite a few “Self Help” selections, specifically in the business genre. The problem with 99% of these books is they try to change what is an introverted individual into an extrovert individual. Cain reveals that this is, for the most part, impossible. If you are an introvert you can only fake being an extrovert. It is like trying to change a homosexual into a heterosexual. They could possibly fake it but you can’t change the nature of the beast. She makes a convincing argument that not only is introversion normal but in many ways an asset. She lists many ways to deal with introversion in today’s extroverted business climate and world in general.

    The narrator is the best female narrator that I have ever listened to. I have many hundreds of books in my Audible collections but for some reason I have never cared for female narrators. Mazur has changed that. As with some of my favorite narrators, I will specifically search for selections that she has done. She is that good!

    Now the bad part for me; maybe not you. All of Cain’s heroes in modern day life are liberals. She gushes on and on about Al Gore, Barbara Streisand, President Obama and a host of many people that I have severe disdain for. I understand that it is her book and she can slant it as she wishes but considering the subject matter it was unnecessary. If you are politically conservative this leftist lean is annoying but if you think you would be interested in the subject matter this is still a must get selection.

    145 of 182 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jessica Smith 10-07-13 Member Since 2015
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    "Couldn't Finish"

    While I do thing the overall message of this book was good and necessary, I was bothered (and had a really hard time getting over) some basic biases? (not sure if that is exactly the right word) that the author had. First of all, she rages on Harvard MBAs and then quotes time and time again research that Harvard MBAs did.

    I think one underlying fallacy that she adopts is the idea that people contribute high quality work because they are introverted. And that if only more people would be introverted, we would have more high quality work.

    It's as if she is saying that only cars that take diesel fuel are good cars. Just because introverts are fueled differently than extroverts doesn't mean their quality of work is better or worse.

    The author must have some bones she wanted to pick and so she added them (and eventually diluted) the main point of her book. I think it is important that we allow people to be introverted just as we allow people to be extroverted, but I think she missed the target on what makes a person contribute high-quality work.

    11 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tracet Hamden, CT, United States 09-13-13
    Tracet Hamden, CT, United States 09-13-13
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    "Not sure we're so powerful as all that"

    Quiet kicks off with the tale of Rosa Parks. The author imagined – and maybe I did too – that Miss Parks was a stately woman with a bold personality who could stand off against a bus full of people, an irate driver, and the police, and win – but she wasn't. She was small, and quiet, and tired, and simply refused – quietly – on that particular evening to comply with a stupid rule. And the author asks "How could you be shy and courageous?" This surprised me. Aren't the shy inherently courageous? What extroverts do without thinking – from asking questions in meetings or class to going to parties – introverts see as hurdles to be got over. Extroverts have to be brave in extraordinary circumstances. The shy have to be brave every damn day.

    This sets the stage for the book. I learned quite a lot, but questioned some of the conclusions and directions the author went with, and in the end I can't say I feel the power the subtitle mentions. It's possible, and I see how – but it's a hard row to hoe, and all the other metaphors in "Hard Knock Life".

    I should say, before I begin to maunder and meander about the book, that Kathe Mazur does a lovely job of the reading. She maintains a mostly neutral tone, so that her voice merges with the work; she disappears into the narration, for the most part. I'm curious about how her style would work with fiction; with non-fiction it's perfect.

    I scored 19 out of 20 in the evaluation quiz in this book's first chapter; my only diversion from pure introversion (sorry 'bout that) is that I do like to multitask. I don't like to just watch tv – I'll be on the computer at the same time, or sewing, or something, anything. I hate driving with just the radio on now – if I don't have an audiobook in my ear I feel like I'm wasting valuable time. But even this might be a result of living in an extroverted world; I've had to learn how to multitask in my jobs, and it's sloshed over into life.

    Being an introvert (with the addition of shyness, which, I find, is not the same thing – just shoot me now) … For me, that means that almost every morning when it came time to go to school I would feel sick. I had a ridiculously high absentee rate, because in general school was hell for me. I liked the classes, loved the way the world opened up a little every day, even kind of liked homework sometimes. But being expected to participate, being called on whether or not I raised my hand, having to participate in the group projects and readings-aloud and other torments teachers love to devise … Having to cope with my classmates, even those I considered friends… When I was in my mid teens I saw Dead Poets Society for the first time, and I was shattered. I was, I am Todd Anderson (only with much better parents). The wonderful, fictional Mr. Keating recognized Todd's limits, and knew how to move him past them. I never met the teacher who cared to do that – I never had a Mr. Keating, or even a Neil. (If you don't know what I'm talking about go watch the movie. Yawp.)

    In elementary school, in high school, in art school, had I been outspoken, had I been outgoing, had I at least been able to speak up and say "Oy! Over here!" – things might have been different. I wasn't able. Knowing that without a drastically different setting things I couldn't have been able – that alone made this a worthwhile read. "At school you might have been prodded to come 'out of your shell'—that noxious expression which fails to appreciate that some animals naturally carry shelter". Well, yeah. And prying a snail out of its shell will have disastrous results for the snail.

    And then there's work. The same thought processes go on in the average manager's minds as in the average teacher's: reward the ones who successfully walk the line between conformism and aggression, and pay attention to the ones who make you pay attention. Three words: "Team-building exercises"… the mere phrases makes me queasy. Why don't managers realize that the reason these things build camaraderie is because it unites everyone in their absolute loathing of the moronic and grating waste of time that they are? How does anyone think they're a good thing? Or, at least, that they're a good thing for everyone?

    There is a section of the book which focuses on the Harvard Business School, and everything this author says about the school makes exquisite sense in terms of W's attendance there. For me, for introverts in general and those poor buggers who matriculate their introversion, it's another circle of hell. The title of an article from the HSB newspaper is quoted: "Arrogant, or Simply Confident?" Er. If you have to ask … Heh. If you have to ask, you might be an introvert.

    A bit of an aside, from this section: "'It is approximately 2:30 PM, October 5th,' the students are told, 'and you have just crash-landed in a float place on the east shore of Laura Lake, in the subarctic region of the northern Quebec-Newfoundland border.' Um … huh? Newfoundland is an island, and so doesn't exactly share a border with any province; Quebec borders the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Also, this furthers a stupid stereotype that Newfoundland is glacial and filled with walruses and igloos. It's really not. Perhaps they meant Labrador? Also, Google Maps shows the lake is something like 13 hours from the coast. What idiot wrote this scenario?

    Part of what helps make people successful, or perhaps simply a characteristic of successful people, is in their speech patterns. "Verbal fluency and sociability are the two most important predictors of success, according to a Stanford Business School study." Also, talking fast is seen as a good thing. Well, as the Mythbusters say, there's your problem. When I talk fast it's obviously nerves, not aggression or confidence. And, sadly, I'm one of those who waits for an opening to speak. I despise people who begin talking before I've finished a sentence – shockingly, customer service reps do it all the time; I've gotten into the habit of just finishing anyway. For me, it doesn't matter if the person I'm speaking to has just said something moronic (for instance, that Lake Laura is on the border of Newfoundland) or brilliant or anything in between that requires a response from me, I will wait for a pause before I interject. It's what I was brought up to call "politeness", and also ties into my own reserve. Apparently, what I see as basic manners is actually a hindrance to my success. Oh dear.

    I unfortunately did not make note of who said it, but here's a quote that's sending me (and this review) on another tangent: "I'm sure Our Lord was [an extrovert]"… Really? How odd. I suppose every group tries to claim Jesus as one of their own, but I've never thought of Him as an extrovert. Charismatic, certainly; not shy, by any means; confident – well, sure, with God on His side… but extraverted? I really hesitate to class Christ in with some of the huckster evangelists making millions off his name.

    Okay. Anyway. Another quote:

    "Embarrassment reveals how much the individual cares about the rules that bind us to one another. … It's better to mind too much than to mind too little."

    That's interesting. And it's true – the ones who are never embarrassed are the ones you have to be wary of. My sociopathic ex-boss was never embarrassed.

    It suggests … that sensitive types think in an unusually complex fashion. It may also help explain why they're so bored by small talk. If you're thinking in more complicated ways … then talking about the weather, or where you went for the holidays, is not quite as interesting as talking about values or morality. The other thing Aaron found about sensitive people is that sometimes they are highly empathic. It's as if they have thinner boundaries, separating them from other people's emotions, and from the tragedies and cruelties of the world. They tend to have unusually strong consciences. They avoid violent movies and tv shows. They're acutely aware of the consequences of a lapse in their own behavior. In social settings they often focus on subjects like personal problems which others consider "too heavy"….

    And

    "The description of such characters as "thin-skinned" is meant metaphorically, but it turns out it is actually quite literal … skin conductance tests … High-reactive introverts sweat more."

    Fabulous. Shoot me now. Yup, this book is all about me. (Except I love Criminal Minds, and when I spent a solid week a while back catching up on Boardwalk Empire and Game of Thrones I tended to walk away from my computer dazed at the enormous body count.)

    I've gone through my life saying – or at least thinking – Don't you see that? Don't you hear that? Well, now I know – they, whoever they are at any given moment, might not see or hear – or feel or understand – whatever it is I do. I've said elsewhere that my sociopathic ex-boss loved to refer to me on every possible occasion as the office's "bleeding heart liberal". And here I learn that that hasn't been entirely a choice with me. I am wired to cry at Hallmark commercials and well up when someone else – even a complete stranger on tv – cries.

    Yay. Bloody amygdala. Bloody pain in the arse amygdala.

    How nice – how calm and unstressful and unteary – it must be to function at a lower level of empathy and heart-bleeding.

    I loved the tidbits about the "Griselda moods" of Eleanor Roosevelt – "named for a princess in a medieval legend who retreated into silence". Rosa Parks and Eleanor Roosevelt – having two such standouts among "my people" makes it all seem a little less dreadful.

    I loved the example of "The Bus to Abilene": "about a family sitting on a porch in Texas on a hot summer day and somebody says, 'I am bored. Why don't we go to Abilene?' When they get to Abilene, somebody says, 'You know, I didn't really want to go'. And the next person says, 'I didn't want to go – I thought you wanted to go' and so on…. The Bus to Abilene anecdote reveals our tendency to follow those who initiate an action – any action." The ones who speak up control the actions of the rest – especially those of us who hesitate to express an opinion.

    This was a fascinating book; it was enlightening; it was clarifying. As I said at some point earlier, it is good in a way to know that, for the most part, I couldn't have handled a great many situations in my life very much differently. I’m wired to behave as I do. Also … knowing I'm not alone in this is, I suppose, also good. The introverts are the ones who don't network and make a splash, which means you can be in a room with ten introverts and two extraverts and it's the latter pair you – and the introverts – will remember later. Whereas each of those ten introverts will go away thinking they were the only ones who were uncomfortable and itching to get out. What a shame. If those ten introverts could get together, they might have a better time. Then again, getting together is antithetical to their nature, so … basically? The upshot? It sucks to be an introvert.

    On the whole, though, I'm not sure what reading this accomplishes. It's startling to read (listen to) a really damned accurate description of my own personality, and to learn that there have been scientific studies done on people exactly like me to find out why we are like me.

    It's nice to have confirmation that there are scientific reasons why to me the word "party" does not mean happy times, and that there are plenty of other people who feel the same way.

    I think I understand better now why some people love Bosch and death metal and bull fights, when I prefer Vermeer and Billy Joel and the Puppy Bowl.

    But I don't really need validation. I'm old(ish). I've (finally) reached a point in my life where I know my limits, know when I can push them and when I'd be better off not, know how to fake it when I have no choice. "Power"? In a world which disregards those who don't push themselves forward? No.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Nancy Waterloo, ON, Canada 01-25-13
    Nancy Waterloo, ON, Canada 01-25-13 Member Since 2014

    I love learning, teaching, and exploring!

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    "Informative for Introverts and Extroverts alike"

    When I decided to read this book, I figured that it would appeal mostly to individuals with introverted personality traits. However, I came to realize that the information presented was helpful to both sides of the introvert/extrovert spectrum. The book included descriptions of many studies on personality and individual/group dynamics and I thoroughly enjoyed these aspects.

    The author presents the case that introverts are an important part of society and should not be asked to conform to the more gregarious ideals of the Western world. It came across almost as a defense for introverted behavior. I would definitely recommend this book to my friends, whether they are introverted or extroverted.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Gary Las Cruces, NM, United States 05-25-12
    Gary Las Cruces, NM, United States 05-25-12 Member Since 2016

    l'enfer c'est les autres

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    "Enjoyable Read."

    An enjoyable read. The author puts herself in the story to good effect. You, the reader, will discover things about yourself that you probably weren't aware of. I recommend taking the introvert/extrovert quiz in the book at the 31:30 mark of the first chapter before you start reading the book. Also, if you don't know where you are on the sensitive/intuitive scale take a sensitive/intuitive quick assessment test you can find on the internet before you start reading the book. The will make those sections of the book all the more interesting.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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