We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
Now Audiobook

Now: The Physics of Time - and the Ephemeral Moment That Einstein Could Not Explain

Regular Price:$28.00
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

You are reading the word now right now. But what does that mean? What makes the ephemeral moment now so special? Its enigmatic character has bedeviled philosophers, priests, and modern-day physicists from Augustine to Einstein and beyond. Einstein showed that the flow of time is affected by both velocity and gravity, yet he despaired at his failure to explain the meaning of now. Equally puzzling: Why does time flow? Some physicists have given up trying to understand and call the flow of time an illusion, but eminent experimentalist physicist Richard A. Muller protests. He says physics should explain reality, not deny it.

In Now, Muller does more than poke holes in past ideas; he crafts his own revolutionary theory, one that makes testable predictions. He begins by laying out - with the refreshing clarity that made Physics for Future Presidents so successful - a firm and remarkably clear explanation of the physics building blocks of his theory: relativity, entropy, entanglement, antimatter, and the big bang. With the stage thus set, he reveals a startling way forward.

Muller points out that the standard big bang theory explains the ongoing expansion of the universe as the continuous creation of new space. He argues that time is also expanding and that the leading edge of the new time is what we experience as now. This thought-provoking vision has remarkable implications for some of our biggest questions, not only in physics but also in philosophy, including the ongoing debate about the reality of free will. Moreover, his theory is testable. Muller's monumental work will spark major debate about the most fundamental assumptions of our universe and may crack one of physics' longest-standing enigmas.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©2016 Richard A. Muller (P)2016 Random House Audio

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.4 (115 )
5 star
 (72)
4 star
 (28)
3 star
 (9)
2 star
 (4)
1 star
 (2)
Overall
4.3 (97 )
5 star
 (59)
4 star
 (17)
3 star
 (14)
2 star
 (3)
1 star
 (4)
Story
4.5 (101 )
5 star
 (65)
4 star
 (28)
3 star
 (6)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (2)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Manish Kataria 10-25-16 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
    5
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    13
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A book with good beginning that fizzles out in end"

    This is one of those books which could have been exceptionally good but fails to make it. It started off well and I developed high hopes only to find that as the book progressed it became philosophical ramblings of the author instead of a science book for lay people.

    For example, in the latter part of the book the author starts discussing about soul and makes a point that he feels that he certainly has a soul though he is not sure about other animals. I have just one question for the author - if we have something like soul which other animals don't have , at what point during evolution did we develop it? Every cell in our body is a living thing , so does it mean that your soul is divided among trillions of cells?

    Despite its flaws the book does shine in bits and pieces. Some topics have been explained well.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Teklover 11-17-16
    Teklover 11-17-16
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    12
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Big let down at the end"

    This book isn't about the physics of now, it's about free will and the soul.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Lynn 11-24-16
    Lynn 11-24-16 Member Since 2015

    Writer, painter and unabashed romantic with passion for history and mystery.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    55
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    87
    16
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Bewildering, mind blowing, ultimately enlightening"

    I'm an artist and writer, very right-brained, sadly inept in mathematics and the sciences. Yet I have always been fascinated by Physics. Physics has remained a bewildering foreign language to me. Over the years, I thought if I listened to enough words spoken in the language Physics, I would suddenly understand it. Until this book, my hope has been unfulfilled. However, about half way through this book, my brain experienced an awakening to the notion of symmetry. I can't explain it, but from that moment forward, I understood, haltingly it is true, how and why Physics reveals and predicts the universe and life. I am going to listen to this book from the beginning again and again.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Daniel Simion 11-06-16 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    10
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Interesting but surprising opinion"

    Overall the book is interesting and well written. A few notes though: I think his religious beliefs might distort his way of thinking or at least, at some moment, I felt the author is making an effort to reconciliate faith and reason. I don't agree with him regarding his opinion on free will and the existence of a soul beyond physical body, beyond consciousness. Those have no base other than belief. If it can't be disproved it does not mean it exists. All in all it's worth reading.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Don Dean COLORADO SPRINGS, Colombia 10-05-16
    Don Dean COLORADO SPRINGS, Colombia 10-05-16 Member Since 2016

    Don A … Background in Radiation Oncology and Information systems.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    29
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    53
    8
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "The Physics of Time – Intelligent, Intuitive and a Great Read"
    Where does Now rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    1st… I rarely write reviews, and when I do, it's when I find its a book that has an author that has a very high IQ and is without a massive ego to go along with it. I was very pleased with the scientific content of Richard's book as well as how the story is laid out. For those of you, that enjoy Marcelo Gleiser's books; you'll most likely find The Physics of Time an enjoyable read. I would place this book in the top 3% of the hundreds of science-based audiobooks I've listened to in the last ten years.


    What did you like best about this story?

    While no physicist can fully tell their "story of time" without using advanced calculus, Richard Muller does an excellent job of simplifying the physics without " talking down" to the reader. He also provides his career experience regarding who he has worked with (such as Saul Perlmutter Nobel Prize winner 2011) which helps to make the story more interesting and personal. While the author is fully aware of the "strangeness of quantum mechanics" he eloquently tells the story of time without "falling into the rabbit hole" of absurdity. The author also does an excellent job in carefully helping the reader to understand what an incredible gift science is, but he also helps the reader to understand that science has its limits.I must say this is a refreshing perspective from the many other scientific authors that speak about the scientific method with "evangelical zeal."


    Have you listened to any of Christopher Grove’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    Christopher Grove did a great job narrating this book. A great voice and does a very good job in pronouncing some of the technical terms correctly


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Yes… Very engaging and very well narrated


    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 10-04-16
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Worth the listen"

    I learned a lot and gained some perspective. I have read many physics books but this one has some better first principals explanations.

    Also, nice job calling out physics on its shortcomings.

    I could do without the free will and soul stuff.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Richard S. Zipper 11-07-16
    HELPFUL VOTES
    16
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    9
    8
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Not worth the time"

    This is a feeble attempt to use physics to conclude "a soul" exists.

    The author puts down statements which cannot be tested throughout the first 20 something chapters ... then concludes with a statement which cannot be tested.

    The book was well read and the book does address some of the interesting aspects of quantum physics and time ... but the author goes off the rails at the end.

    There are plenty of other books on quantum physics and time ... I would NOT recommend this one.

    4 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 12-04-16 Member Since 2016
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    12
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "You can stop reading when Muller mentions "the soul.""

    Pretty decent book save for a few chapters. The book has insight about modern physics and takes into account recent discoveries, such as gravitational waves recorded by LIGO. However, Muller then goes on to talk about the soul and a lot of other unscientific nonsense. It doesn't get better from there.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Phillip J. Gaskill New York 11-26-16
    Phillip J. Gaskill New York 11-26-16 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
    7
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    12
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Horrible narrator"

    I haven't finished the book yet, but felt I HAD to try to counteract some of the other reviewers who loved the narrator. I can't remember when I last heard a narrator, especially of a science book, mispronounce so many words. Hell, he can't even pronounce "hydrogen," let alone a ton of other words. VERY distracting. Good voice, good rhythm and all that, but it's impossible in some cases to figure out what word he's trying to say. ¶ I'll add more commentary about the content itself later, after I've finished the book. Muller is one of my favorite scientists; I used to watch broadcasts of his class "Physics for Future Presidents" (i.e., physics in a nutshell, just what you need to know to survive in today's world without becoming a world-class expert in any one sub-field) and absolutely loved them.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kix 11-10-16
    Kix 11-10-16 Member Since 2016
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "brilliant book, truly mind-boggling"

    amazing book. expected nothing less from dr muller. would love to read more from him.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
Sort by:
  • Amazon Kunde
    12/2/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Physicist is incompetent philosopher"

    Finishing this book was arduous.

    The taxing condescending tone doesn't help the incompetent philosophy.

    This book is about 5% interesting physics. The rest is wikipedia level introductory material and religious and political propaganda argued for without any understanding of the philosophical subjects involved.

    This book would never pass peer review. Not that it has to.

    Muller also rants about scientific metaphors using natural language terms, yet transgresses more on that front in this very volume than most.

    May make an interesting read for fans of Chopra, otherwise avoid at all costs.

    Terribly damaging to the intended audience, American High School students, this unclear mess is best forgotten about.

    I suggest you wait for more papers on the actual theory being proposed - ephemerality as another horizon of expanding spacetime, the physics are truly interesting.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Alexander Marinov
    10/28/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "cute"

    interesting story far connected to science and reality.
    worthy listen it at least once. enjoy. learn and study

    0 of 3 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.