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How Not to Be Wrong Audiobook

How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking

Ellenberg chases mathematical threads through a vast range of time and space, from the everyday to the cosmic, encountering, among other things, baseball, Reaganomics, daring lottery schemes, Voltaire, the replicability crisis in psychology, Italian Renaissance painting, artificial languages, the development of non-Euclidean geometry, the coming obesity apocalypse, Antonin Scalia's views on crime and punishment, the psychology of slime molds, what Facebook can and can't figure out about you, and the existence of God.
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Publisher's Summary

The Freakonomics of math - a math-world superstar unveils the hidden beauty and logic of the world and puts its power in our hands.

The math we learn in school can seem like a dull set of rules, laid down by the ancients and not to be questioned. In How Not to Be Wrong, Jordan Ellenberg shows us how terribly limiting this view is: Math isn’t confined to abstract incidents that never occur in real life, but rather touches everything we do—the whole world is shot through with it.

Math allows us to see the hidden structures underneath the messy and chaotic surface of our world. It’s a science of not being wrong, hammered out by centuries of hard work and argument. Armed with the tools of mathematics, we can see through to the true meaning of information we take for granted: How early should you get to the airport? What does “public opinion” really represent? Why do tall parents have shorter children? Who really won Florida in 2000? And how likely are you, really, to develop cancer?

How Not to Be Wrong presents the surprising revelations behind all of these questions and many more, using the mathematician’s method of analyzing life and exposing the hard-won insights of the academic community to the layman—minus the jargon. Ellenberg chases mathematical threads through a vast range of time and space, from the everyday to the cosmic, encountering, among other things, baseball, Reaganomics, daring lottery schemes, Voltaire, the replicability crisis in psychology, Italian Renaissance painting, artificial languages, the development of non-Euclidean geometry, the coming obesity apocalypse, Antonin Scalia’s views on crime and punishment, the psychology of slime molds, what Facebook can and can’t figure out about you, and the existence of God.

Ellenberg pulls from history as well as from the latest theoretical developments to provide those not trained in math with the knowledge they need. Math, as Ellenberg says, is “an atomic-powered prosthesis that you attach to your common sense, vastly multiplying its reach and strength.” With the tools of mathematics in hand, you can understand the world in a deeper, more meaningful way. How Not to Be Wrong will show you how.

©2014 Jordan Ellenberg (P)2014 Penguin Audio

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  •  
    Michael Walnut Creek, CA, United States 07-02-14
    Michael Walnut Creek, CA, United States 07-02-14 Member Since 2016

    I focus on fiction, sci-fi, fantasy, science, history, politics and read a lot. I try to review everything I read.

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    "Great book but better in writing"

    The title of this book is somewhat misleading (which the author admits). Instead it should have been "how to use math to not feel stupid when you are wrong". The author freely admits the dark truth, most people are not going to use the math they learn. Amazingly this is true even of scientists. Most of the math stuff I learned I don't need, as now I use Excel and Mathematica. Yet this book explains the part of math I do use, and many people don't realize is the important part of math, that is, to extend common sense by other means. This book includes primers of the very basics of calculus and statistics that everyone should know. The stories are humorous, interesting, and make the point that a little math can really help make good decisions.

    Unfortunately, there are some parts of this book that don't translate well to audio. A table of numbers can be compared at a glance, but a bunch of spoken numbers are not easy to compare. If you wonder what good is learning math, this is a great book, but I would recommend the written version. The author's narration is quite good, with a very positive attitude that comes through.

    20 of 21 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Bonny 06-03-14
    Bonny 06-03-14 Member Since 2016

    Mother, knitter, reader, lifelong learner, technical writer, former library assistant & hematologist.

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    "Mathematics is the extension of common sense..."

    I run across a lot of books that I add to my to-be-read list and then forget about until after their publication dates or I stumble upon the book in the library or bookstore. How Not to Be Wrong was initially one of those books, but it sounded so good that I found myself obsessively thinking about it and started a search for a pre-publication copy. Since I'm not a librarian, didn't win a copy via First Reads, and don't have friends at Penguin Press, it took some time and effort, but having procured a copy and read it, I can say that it was well worth my time and $6.00. How Not to Be Wrong is a catchy title, but for me, this book is really about the subtitle, The Power of Mathematical Thinking.

    Ellenberg deftly explains why mathematics is important, gives the reader myriad examples applicable to our own lives, and also tells us what math can't do. He writes, “Mathematics is the extension of common sense by other means”, and proceeds to expound upon an incredible number of interesting subjects and how mathematics can help us better understand these topics, such as obesity, economics, reproducibility, the lottery, error-correcting codes, and the existence (or not) of God. He writes in a compelling, explanatory way that I think anyone with an interest in mathematics and/or simply understanding things more completely will be able to grasp. Ellenberg writes “Do the Math” for Slate, and it's evident in his column and this book that he knows how to explain mathematical ideas to non-mathematicians, and even more so, seems to enjoy doing so with great enthusiasm. I won't pretend that I understood everything discussed in this book, but it's such an excellent book that I also bought the audio version and am listening to it (read by the author himself!) so I have a much more thorough understanding. I've wished for a book like this for a long time, and I'd like to thank Jordan Ellenberg for writing it for me!

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jim Fuqua Hendersonville, TN United States 12-15-14
    Jim Fuqua Hendersonville, TN United States 12-15-14

    Jim

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    "Much Good Information"

    You must have some background with math to appreciate this book. You don't need to be a mathematician, but you need to have some concept of statistics -- not details -- just a basic idea of how statistics work.

    The last half of the book was more interesting to me than the first half. Don't start there, start at the first so you will understand the last half.

    I found his comments on multi-candidate elections where no candidate gets a majority to be particularly interesting.

    There are parts to this book that drag. Some may drag because you might not be interested in the subject he uses to illustrate a mathematical process or principal. When he talks about sports statistics keep in mind that he is illustrating mathematical principles and not focusing on sports.

    You can and will learn a lot from this book and will enjoy most of the book. You might learn more than you want to know about some mathematical subjects, but math is a tool and each addition to our toolkit strengthens us whether we know it at the time or not.

    Jim Fuqua

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael Chicago, IL, USA 02-13-15
    Michael Chicago, IL, USA 02-13-15 Member Since 2005
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    "Best book I've read in a long time"

    Puts into words many ideas I've had my whole life. So glad to have a mathematical basis for them now

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Scott Scarborough, ON, Canada 06-28-14
    Scott Scarborough, ON, Canada 06-28-14 Member Since 2013
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    "Fun for mathies"
    What did you like best about this story?

    So this is the book for those who were always intrigued about how any of high school algebra and calculus would ever be useful/applicable in the real world. From the first anecdote - about how in it was ultimately decided where to place extra armour in bombers during WWII - this book had me. Math was never my best subject but I found this all intriguing and fun - a mix of Freakonomics, Malcolm Gladwell, and trivia rolled into one. Ellenberg - a college math professor - doesn't talk down to the reader and be warned, he takes us through various equations that underlie the real world problems at stake so some fluency in math is helpful but not necessary. I'll be the first to admit I got lost in some of the equations and logical problems which probably make the print edition of this an easier go than the audiobook format. Still, it should not deter you and it all adds up to great fun that is informative and at times, surprising. Ellenberg narrates this himself in a lively manner which makes you wish you had him in place of you fill in the blanks math teacher of your younger days.


    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Frederic Simon HOD HASHARON, Israel 03-22-16
    Frederic Simon HOD HASHARON, Israel 03-22-16 Member Since 2014
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    "Extremely easy to listen to, and feeling smarter!"

    Amazing book, that gave me deep and great data while having a good time.
    I always love to feel smarter after enjoying a book that so ready to listen to.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Andrew 11-13-15
    Andrew 11-13-15 Member Since 2016
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    "Good conversation fodder"

    I listened to this audiobook while getting my doctorate, specifically while taking a quantitative methodology and statistics class. This book had so many applications to social science research, but also to just life in general. I spoke about different topics from the book with friends on hikes, at work, on car rides, and virtually any chance I had.

    10/10 recommend.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jakub Furmaga 09-18-15 Member Since 2015
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    "Great book"

    This is a fantastic book in which the author proves this thesis that mathematics is awesome. He uses a lot of fascinating examples from both history and medicine. I work in medicine and some of the issues he explores are very pertinent to everyday issues. Would recommend this book to anybody who can read.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Aran 08-11-15
    Aran 08-11-15 Member Since 2013
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    "Great!"

    Great math, great stories, great insight. Loved it. I'll use many examples in my classes. should be required reading.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Lowraod 07-12-15
    Lowraod 07-12-15
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    "Interesting but not compelling"
    Any additional comments?

    I read a few pages in a bookstore and was interested. So i bought it on Audible. Turns out the book was different from what I expected. More about some specific ways math can be used or abused, then a more general discussion about the applicability of math. However the subjects covered are interesting, such as how to win at games of chance, how to properly conduct studies, and how to interpret "facts". This book will make you more critical about the so often quoted "studies" that are supposed to prove or disprove something (including the last presidential election). For that it is worthwhile to listen to. I do have to admit getting lost in the more involved discussion of algorithms, but found that it did not detract much from the points being made

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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