We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
Call anytime(888) 283-5051
Hallucinations | [Oliver Sacks]

Hallucinations

Have you ever seen something that wasn't really there? Heard someone call your name in an empty house? Sensed someone following you and turned around to find nothing? Hallucinations don't belong wholly to the insane. Much more commonly, they are linked to sensory deprivation, intoxication, illness, or injury. People with migraines may see shimmering arcs of light or tiny, Lilliputian figures of animals and people.
Regular Price:$28.00
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

Have you ever seen something that wasn't really there? Heard someone call your name in an empty house? Sensed someone following you and turned around to find nothing?

Hallucinations don't belong wholly to the insane. Much more commonly, they are linked to sensory deprivation, intoxication, illness, or injury. People with migraines may see shimmering arcs of light or tiny, Lilliputian figures of animals and people. People with failing eyesight, paradoxically, may become immersed in a hallucinatory visual world. Hallucinations can be brought on by a simple fever or even the act of waking or falling asleep, when people have visions ranging from luminous blobs of color to beautifully detailed faces or terrifying ogres. Those who are bereaved may receive comforting "visits" from the departed. In some conditions, hallucinations can lead to religious epiphanies or even the feeling of leaving one's own body.

Humans have always sought such life-changing visions, and for thousands of years have used hallucinogenic compounds to achieve them. As a young doctor in California in the 1960s, Oliver Sacks had both a personal and a professional interest in psychedelics. These, along with his early migraine experiences, launched a lifelong investigation into the varieties of hallucinatory experience.

Here, with his usual elegance, curiosity, and compassion, Dr. Sacks weaves together stories of his patients and of his own mind-altering experiences to illuminate what hallucinations tell us about the organization and structure of our brains, how they have influenced every culture's folklore and art, and why the potential for hallucination is present in us all, a vital part of the human condition.

Permissions Acknowledgments

Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following for permission to reprint previously published material:

American Academy of Neurology: Excerpt from "Anton's Syndrome Accompanying Withdrawal Hallucinosis in a Blind Alcoholic" by Barbara E. Swartz and John C. M. Brust from Neurology 34 (1984). Used by permission of the American Academy of Neurology.

American Psychiatric Publishing: Excerpt from "Weir Mitchell's Visual Hallucinations as a Grief Reaction" by Jerome S. Schneck, M.D., from American Journal of Psychiatry, copyright 1989. Used by permission of American Psychiatric Publishing.

BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.: Excerpt from "Heautoscopy, Epilepsy and Suicide" by P. Brugger, R. Agosti, M. Regard, H. G. Wieser and T. Landis from Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, July 1, 1994. Used by permission of BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

Cambridge University Press: Excerpts from Disturbances of the Mind by Douwe Draaisma, translated by Barbara Fasting. Copyright 2006 by Douwe Draaisma. Used by permission of Cambridge University Press.

Canadian Psychological Association: Excerpt from "Effects of Decreased Variation of the Sensory Environment" by W. H. Bexton, W. Heron and T. H. Scott from Canadian Psychology (1954). Copyright 1954 by Canadian Psychological Association. Excerpt from "Perceptual Changes after Prolonged Sensory Isolation (Darkness and Silence)" by John P. Zubek, Dolores Pushkar, Wilma Sansom and J. Gowing from Canadian Psychology (1961). Copyright 1961 by Canadian Psychological Association.

Elsevier Limited: Excerpt from "Migraine: From Cappadocia to Queen Square" in Background to Migraine, edited by Robert Smith (London: William Heinemann, 1967). Used by permission of Elsevier Limited.

The New York Times: Excerpts from "Lifting, Lights, and Little People" by Siri Hustvedt from The New York Times Blog, February 17, 2008. Used by permission of The New York Times.

Oxford University Press: Excerpt from "Dostoiewski's Epilepsy" by T. Alajouanine from Brain, June 1, 1963. Used by permission of Oxford University Press.

Royal College of Psychiatrists: Excerpt from "Sudden Religious Conversion in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy" by Kenneth Dewhurst and A. W. Beard from British Journal of Psychiatry 117 (1970). Used by permission of the Royal College of Psychiatrists.

Scientific American: Excerpt from "Abducted!" by Michael Shermer from Scientific American 292 (2005). Copyright 2005 by Scientific American, Inc. All rights reserved.

Vintage Books: Excerpts from Speak, Memory by Vladimir Nabokov, copyright 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1967, copyright renewed 1994 by the Estate of Vladimir Nabokov. Used by permission of Vintage Books, a division of Random House, Inc.

©2012 Oliver Sacks (P)2012 Random House Audio

What the Critics Say

"Effective - largely because Sacks never turns exploitative, instead sketching out each illness with compassion and thoughtful prose. A riveting look inside the human brain and its quirks." (Kirkus Reviews)

"Fascinating.... Writing with his trademark mix of evocative description, probing curiosity, and warm empathy, Sacks once again draws back the curtain on the mind’s improbably workings." (Publishers Weekly)

"Sacks' best-selling nonfiction stories based on his practice of clinical neurology constitute one shining reason for thinking that we're living in a golden age of medical writing.... Sacks defines the best of medical writing." (Booklist)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.9 (260 )
5 star
 (80)
4 star
 (100)
3 star
 (55)
2 star
 (20)
1 star
 (5)
Overall
4.0 (209 )
5 star
 (81)
4 star
 (71)
3 star
 (38)
2 star
 (14)
1 star
 (5)
Story
3.8 (217 )
5 star
 (71)
4 star
 (73)
3 star
 (52)
2 star
 (10)
1 star
 (11)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Seren Kihei, HI, United States 01-30-13
    Seren Kihei, HI, United States 01-30-13
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    3
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great material"
    What made the experience of listening to Hallucinations the most enjoyable?

    The book is great. Material is extremely interesting and written well in understandable terms for the layman. Left me wanting more information about the neuro processes involved. Great mix of science and sociology.


    Any additional comments?

    Not the best suited for audio. Difficult to navigate between listening on iPhone and hooking up to car system. Kept resetting to beginning of chapter.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Chris Seattle, WA, United States 01-09-13
    Chris Seattle, WA, United States 01-09-13 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
    12
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "worth a listen but.........."

    Very informative and interesting but gets off topic a bit towards the middle of the book when it becomes a short history of Oliver Sacks early drug experiences. Over all this book is worth a listen.. Its only real downfall is the narration. Why Dan Woren felt the need to give accents to each quote, one will never know. Why, no matter what nationality, every accent performed sounds like Ricardo Montalbán is even more of a mystery.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    geffrey KENT, WA, United States 12-28-12
    geffrey KENT, WA, United States 12-28-12 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    8
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    7
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Quite an eyeful (for your ear)"

    Like Malcolm Gladwell, Sacks rarely misses the bullseye when spinning a great anecdote, and when his sights are tightened on a topic as ripe (and as personally held dear) as this one -hallucinations- you have the makings of a minor masterpiece. Wryly reported and expertly narrated, here is an accounting both personal and academic that begs you to bed early to sneak in an extra chapter, and then later to gaze at your medicine cabinet with curious and longing eyes.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Arnold Warrens, WI, United States 12-28-12
    Arnold Warrens, WI, United States 12-28-12 Member Since 2011
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    8
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A Very interesting publication"
    Where does Hallucinations rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    It ranks very high in the overall contents and presentation.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Hallucinations?

    The massive presentation of sample information of many many people.


    Have you listened to any of Dan Woren and Oliver Sacks ’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    Yes I have listened to their works.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    I think it overall was left me moved with an overview of the subject matter.


    Any additional comments?

    I think it was a very good book and I would like to read the book and listen together
    for a more detailed study.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Micah Shaw ALBUQUERQUE, NM, US 12-11-12
    Micah Shaw ALBUQUERQUE, NM, US 12-11-12 Member Since 2011
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    36
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "If you love hearing peoples' stories."
    What about Dan Woren and Oliver Sacks ’s performance did you like?

    I found Dan Woren's accent shifting (in order to represent the nationality of someone quoted) a bit annoying at first, but I came around to it. His reading style was helpful to keep track of who was talking, and after the first few times, made me smile when he switched accents.

    I love to hear Oliver Sacks read his work. I can sense the excitement and joy in every sentence, and his voice is endearing.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Absolutely, but this is the case for any Oliver Sacks book.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Anne Carmel Valley, CA, United States 12-11-12
    Anne Carmel Valley, CA, United States 12-11-12 Member Since 2009
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    39
    4
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Much to learn about various forms of hallucination"
    Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

    Unless you have a deep interest in the many types of hallucinations discussed in this book, the information may seem overwhelming.


    Was Hallucinations worth the listening time?

    Not for me, even though I am a fan on Dr. Sack's previous work.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Val Stamford, CT, United States 11-15-12
    Val Stamford, CT, United States 11-15-12 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
    41
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    245
    40
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    3
    7
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "I am not sure what I was expecting"

    I don't know what to make of this book. Maybe I simply don't understand the subject matter. I am half through the book and don't know if I have a patience to finish it. I think, going forward I will wait for reviews first.

    At first there were stories describing delusions/hallucinations in extreme details of people other than Mr. Sacks. It was exciting to listen maybe the first two or three of them... Later, he was describing his own hallucinations, because it appears that he was overdosed on drugs most of the time. ... Mr. Sacks celebrated his 32 yo anniversary by injecting opium... As I said, I don't know what to think, nor do I understand this kind of science. Maybe people that experimented with drugs can relate to this book, I can’t. If I want to hear anything wild, I’d rather listen to Sci-Fi, at least there is a story with a beginning and an end.

    I will do my best to finish the book. If it gets better, I will come back and modify my review.

    I believe, narrator is excellent.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Christi Todd 11-12-12 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Not his best work"

    Unlike his earlier concise and vivid case histories of Sacks' earlier works, Hallucinations contains a great deal of "by the numbers" descriptions of different kinds of hallucinations, syndrome by syndrome. I was disheartened by his explanation of spiritual insights and visions as another form of hallucination, dismissing millennia of human experience as having merely physical origins.

    Some might find the author's story of his own experimentation with hallucinogenic drugs of interest, though to me it was more a story of a man's tendency towards addictive behavior than an insight into the way the brain works.

    The narrator attempted to replicate a number of accents and male and female voices, some of which were more successful than others. His attempt at an Australian accent was particularly and inadvertently humorous, learning towards an Outback Steakhouse caricature.

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mary Lou Atwell Greeley, CO United States 12-13-12
    Mary Lou Atwell Greeley, CO United States 12-13-12 Member Since 2009
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    5
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A book by oliver Sacks, another way of "seein thin"
    What made the experience of listening to Hallucinations the most enjoyable?

    experiential and neurological meanings.


    What was most disappointing about Oliver Sacks’s story?

    I want to do further research into auditory and other nonvisual hallucinations.


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    he uses literature, sight, and "stories."


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?


    a little off as respects inflection


    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 11-19 of 19 results PREVIOUS12NEXT

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.