A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing Audiobook | Lawrence M. Krauss | Audible.com
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A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing | [Lawrence M. Krauss]

A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing

Where did the universe come from? What was there before it? What will the future bring? And finally, why is there something rather than nothing? Krauss’ answers to these and other timeless questions, in a wildly popular lecture on YouTube, has attracted almost a million viewers. One of the few prominent scientists to have actively crossed the chasm between science and popular culture, Krauss reveals that modern science is indeed addressing the question of why there is something rather than nothing—with surprising and fascinating results.
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Publisher's Summary

Where did the universe come from? What was there before it? What will the future bring? And finally, why is there something rather than nothing?

Krauss’ answers to these and other timeless questions, in a wildly popular lecture on YouTube, has attracted almost a million viewers. The last of these questions in particular has been at the center of religious and philosophical debates about the existence of God, and it’s the supposed counterargument to anyone who questions the need for God. Scientists have, however, historically focused on more pressing issues—such as figuring out how the universe actually functions, which could help us to improve our quality of life.

In this cosmological story that rivets as it enlightens, pioneering theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss explains groundbreaking scientific advances that turn the most basic philosophical questions on their head. One of the few prominent scientists to have actively crossed the chasm between science and popular culture, Krauss reveals that modern science is indeed addressing the question of why there is something rather than nothing—with surprising and fascinating results. The beautiful experimental observations and mind-bending theories are all described accessibly, and they suggest that not only can something arise from nothing, something will always arise from nothing.

With his characteristic wry humor and clear explanations, Krauss takes us back to the beginning of the beginning, presenting recent evidence for how our universe evolved—and the implications for how it will end. It will provoke, challenge, and delight listeners as it looks at the most basic underpinnings of existence in a whole new way. And this knowledge that our universe will be quite different in the future has profound consequences and directly affects how we live in the present. As Richard Dawkins described it, this could potentially be the most important scientific book with implications for supernaturalism since Darwin.

©2012 Lawrence M. Krauss (P)2012 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What the Critics Say

“Nothing is not nothing. Nothing is something. That’s how a cosmos can be spawned from the void—a profound idea conveyed in A Universe from Nothing that unsettles some yet enlightens others. Meanwhile, it’s just another day on the job for physicist Lawrence Krauss.” (Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist, American Museum of Natural History)

What Members Say

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  •  
    Dennis Sweden 01-24-12
    Dennis Sweden 01-24-12 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "If you are new to the subject, listen to it!"
    What did you love best about A Universe from Nothing?

    Let me just say, this book is great! But if you (like me) have gone thru a few books on the subject, for example Stephen Hawkins and Leonard Mlodinow’s The Grand Design (A more extensive look into this subject) this one will not make you much cleverer. But it will not bore you, far from it.

    If you have no prior knowledge on the details surrounding the subject this book offers you great new insight from the world of physics and cosmology on how the universe came to be from absolutely nothing. Let me offer you the short layman formula: First there was nothing but nothing happens to be unstable on the quantum level. This “unstableness” created something that we now know as the Big Bang. Sounds weird? Yes it does, and that is one of many side stories of this book: That the modern understanding of reality goes beyond what we humans might be able to understand, comprehend and prefere. A quote from the book summarize this in seven words: “The universe does not owe us comfort”. And perhaps that is true, but I assure any potential reader that this book will offer you awe and wonder about the nature of reality and perhaps a better understanding of what reality is - and what it is not.


    32 of 33 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael Walnut Creek, CA, United States 04-05-13
    Michael Walnut Creek, CA, United States 04-05-13 Member Since 2002

    I focus on fiction, sci-fi, fantasy, science, history, politics and read a lot. I try to review everything I read.

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    "Great Ideas"

    The author’s narration is completely excellent. The book moves quickly and seemed to have much more information than I would have expected from a relatively short work (5.5 hours). I really felt this had the content of something twice as long.

    This book is packed with interesting ideas about how the universe might have evolved from nothingness. Note the all important “might”. This book is much, much less speculative than many popular physics books, nevertheless it is quite speculative, so should be enjoyed as mind broadening and definitely not science fact.

    Most modern popular physics books share a common weakness. The authors are Relativists, String Theorist, Quantumists, or Informationists, but seldom crossover or generalists. Krauss is a relativist with a nod or two to quantum theory and virtually no string theory or information theory. This is a significant weakness. Relativists often cling to particles and continuums of space-time even though there is good reasons to believe both particles and all continuums merely observer phenomena.

    I would recommend reading “The Trouble with Physics” before any other popular physics books.

    Although the author is good at keeping the ideas interesting while (mildly) mentioning how much we don’t know, there is an afterword by Dawkins which was a bit science-thumping and I found to be a very weak ending.

    9 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mike Koch 09-24-12
    Mike Koch 09-24-12 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
    274
    ratings
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    204
    47
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    "Makes you think!"

    I mostly read or listen to sci-fi/fantasy and leave getting my cosmology, quantum theory, and particle physics to the nice, digestible shows produced by Discovery, the History channel, and the like. I also really try not to use credits on something this short (less than 6 hours!)...but I'm glad I made an exception for this one. I'll admit I had to listen to the book twice (but enjoyed it both times), and that there are still some things this guy says that...I'll probably never comprehend, but wow...this book is interesting. The author also does the narration, which was actually good in this case - he's got this...sort of...animated, smart-alecky attitude combined with true passion and excitement for his work. I also like his attention to detail (or I should say attention to the right details - trying to cram all the details that went into this work would make a book like this completely inaccessible to someone like me) and his overall...take on science - that scientists don't know everything and how they should spend as much time trying to disprove their results as they do trying to prove them, etc.

    Anyway - the book kind of brings you up to speed on where these guys are on figuring out...the universe, and presents some really interesting ideas on where everything came from (spoiler alert: it's in the title :P - but it's not that simple, trust me). If you're at all interested in the subject - get this book. Oh, and one final thing - Krauss doesn't say there isn't a god - just that there doesn't HAVE to be one - but it doesn't take a rocket scientist to be able superimpose god over what's being presented here either [translated: if you believe in god, this isn't going to change your opinion]

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    02-13-12
    02-13-12 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "an overview of nothing"
    What made the experience of listening to A Universe from Nothing the most enjoyable?

    In order to follow the narrator, you will need to be concentrated, the concepts presented in the book are simple only in appearance. I enjoyed the book and added to other books on the subject you can find on audible I believe I had a good introduction to the matter.


    What about Lawrence M. Krauss and Simon Vance ’s performance did you like?

    in some parts, the narration was a bit fast for me, but this of course is very personal and happened only a view times in the entire book.


    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Stephen The Woodlands, TX, United States 02-06-12
    Stephen The Woodlands, TX, United States 02-06-12 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Fascinating!"
    What did you love best about A Universe from Nothing?

    An advanced level of physics in a fairly easy to follow presentation.


    What did you like best about this story?

    It is interesting to consider that something is a more stable state than nothing.


    Have you listened to any of Lawrence M. Krauss and Simon Vance ’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    No


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    No


    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Gary Las Cruces, NM, United States 08-17-12
    Gary Las Cruces, NM, United States 08-17-12 Member Since 2001

    Letting the rest of the world go by

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    "Nothing is Impossible."

    The book is short, simple and full of attitude.

    'Nothing' is impossible. Just as 'nothing' goes faster than the speed of light (two galaxies far away from each other will recede from each other faster than speed of light), 'nothing' is unstable. Virtual particles will be created and there will be a violation of the second law of thermodynamics. He explains way better than I can and this short book is worth the listen.

    The book explains how our understanding of space has been changing over time. They used to say space was a vacuum, then they would add something to the definition until finally they say that the fabric of space is teeming with vacuum energy and virtual particles are constantly being created and destroyed and dark energy floating around.

    I'm a little bit puzzled why this book didn't make a bigger splash after it's publication. The author did such a good job at defending his view points. I guess, part of the problem is his view points on creation aren't mainstream. There is also the little problem of the biggest mismatch in all of science. The 10 to the 120th magnitude difference between what theory predicts and how much dark energy there really is.

    The author is an exception to the rule that the author should never read his own book. He does a very good job.

    The book is well explained, read and concise. Well worth the quick listen and will give you a good explanation for a possible explanation for our place in the universe.

    9 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mike st paul, MN, United States 09-24-12
    Mike st paul, MN, United States 09-24-12 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    3
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    Story
    "Makes you think!"

    I mostly read or listen to sci-fi/fantasy and leave getting my cosmology, quantum theory, and particle physics to the nice, digestible shows produced by Discovery, the History channel, and the like. I also really try not to use credits on something this short (less than 6 hours!)...but I'm glad I made an exception for this one. I'll admit I had to listen to the book twice (but enjoyed it both times), and that there are still some things this guy says that...I'll probably never comprehend, but wow...this book is interesting. The author also does the narration, which was actually good in this case - he's got this...sort of...animated, smart-alecky attitude combined with true passion and excitement for his work. I also like his attention to detail (or I should say attention to the right details - trying to cram all the details that went into this work would make a book like this completely inaccessible to someone like me) and his overall...take on science - that scientists don't know everything and how they should spend as much time trying to disprove their results as they do trying to prove them, etc.

    Anyway - the book kind of brings you up to speed on where these guys are on figuring out...the universe, and presents some really interesting ideas on where everything came from (spoiler alert: it's in the title :P - but it's not that simple, trust me). If you're at all interested in the subject - get this book. Oh, and one final thing - Krauss doesn't say there isn't a god - just that there doesn't HAVE to be one - but it doesn't take a rocket scientist to be able superimpose god over what's being presented here either [translated: if you believe in god, this isn't going to change your opinion]

    12 of 15 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dennis Johnstown, PA, United States 02-06-12
    Dennis Johnstown, PA, United States 02-06-12
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    "Another great book from Krauss"
    Any additional comments?

    Great explanation of how something can come from nothing for the person that does not have a degree in physics. He uses no convoluted math or technical jargon that can not be understood by the layman.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Donald Santa Rosa, CA, United States 01-12-12
    Donald Santa Rosa, CA, United States 01-12-12 Member Since 2008

    ?

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Reach Exceeds Grasp (Not Surprisingly)"

    The first 2/3 of this already short book are given to an overview of more or less recent developments in physics and cosmology, in preparation for the final 1/3, where at last the subject of the book's title is addressed. When the main arguments of the book do arrive, they turn out to be based on somewhat preliminary and speculative physics- very interesting, but nowhere near satisfying or convincing as an explanation of 'how something could arise from nothing.' Also, the author promises to show how the universe(s) could come into existence without 'preexisting' physical laws- his nothing plus ultra- but fails to actually do so. Honestly I would have been quite surprised and impressed if he had; but it illustrates the most frustrating aspect of the book, which is that it purports to sketch out a framework to obviate all manner of prime mover / first cause arguments, but fails pretty resoundingly to do so.

    Still, thought provoking and worth reading. Author reads pretty well- sounds like Andersen Cooper!

    36 of 49 people found this review helpful
  •  
    William Pleasanton, CA, United States 12-23-12
    William Pleasanton, CA, United States 12-23-12 Member Since 2011

    gr8jibe

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Listen twice"

    Step away from following scientists' explanations of the universe for a couple of years, and you'll find yourself years, or lightyears, behind. That's what I did, while I merely inhabited the universe for a while. Krauss does a great job with his own read, just like lectures he gives, explaining what's currently understood about the universe, and the evidence for it.

    Creationists will find some points of argument against their view, but the book is not about creationism or otherwise. It's about observations which explain how the universe got to be what it is now (or was when the light we're seeing now started travelling toward us).

    I started relistening almost as soon as I finished the first time, to bring into sharper focus the ideas which were new. This is one book which may be ideal for Whispersync. I wouldn't want to miss the author/lecturer's audible explanations, but it would be nice to have the print to review ideas already presented.

    This book stimulated me to listen to the humorous and also recommended A User's Guide to the Universe, which helped round out my understanding of current concepts in cosmology.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
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