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The Windup Girl Audiobook

The Windup Girl

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Publisher's Summary

Anderson Lake is a company man, AgriGen's Calorie Man in Thailand. Under cover as a factory manager, Anderson combs Bangkok's street markets in search of foodstuffs thought to be extinct, hoping to reap the bounty of history's lost calories.

There, he encounters Emiko...Emiko is the Windup Girl, a strange and beautiful creature. One of the New People, Emiko is not human; instead, she is an engineered being, creche-grown and programmed to satisfy the decadent whims of a Kyoto businessman, but now abandoned to the streets of Bangkok. Regarded as soulless beings by some, devils by others, New People are slaves, soldiers, and toys of the rich in a chilling near future in which calorie companies rule the world, the oil age has passed, and the side effects of bio-engineered plagues run rampant across the globe.

What happens when calories become currency? What happens when bio-terrorism becomes a tool for corporate profits, when said bio-terrorism's genetic drift forces mankind to the cusp of post-human evolution? In The Windup Girl, award-winning author Paolo Bacigalupi returns to the world of The Calorie Man (Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award-winner, Hugo Award nominee, 2006) and Yellow Card Man (Hugo Award nominee, 2007) in order to address these poignant questions.

BONUS AUDIO: In an exclusive introduction, author Paolo Bacigalupi explains how a horrible trip to Thailand led to the idea for The Windup Girl.

©2009 Paolo Bacigalupi; (P)2009 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

  • Hugo Award, Best Novel, 2010
  • Nebula Award, Best Novel, 2009
  • Best Books of 2009, Publishers Weekly
  • 10 Best Fiction Books of 2009, Time magazine
  • Best Sci-Fi and Fantasy 2009, Library Journal

"This complex, literate and intensely felt tale, which recalls both William Gibson and Ian McDonald at their very best, will garner Bacigalupi significant critical attention and is clearly one of the finest science fiction novels of the year." (Publishers Weekly)

"The Windup Girl will almost certainly be the most important SF novel of the year for its willingness to confront the most cherished notions of the genre, namely that our future is bright and we will overcome our selfish, cruel nature." (Book Page)

"A classic dystopian novel likely to be short listed for the Nebula and Hugo Awards" (SF Signal)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.7 (4705 )
5 star
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3.7 (3003 )
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4.1 (2982 )
5 star
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 (445)
2 star
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1 star
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Performance
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  •  
    Mary Ryan 02-08-11
    Mary Ryan 02-08-11 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
    7
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    "Interesting story, but I never got into it."

    Interesting dystopia story (disease, food controlled by corrupt government, "windup" people and creatures), but I never really got into it. Some graphic scenes were hard to listen to.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    K.D. Keenan Northern California 01-29-11
    K.D. Keenan Northern California 01-29-11 Member Since 2007

    1emp

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    "Couldn't Do It"

    Despite an interesting vision of a dystopic world, I could not finish even the first half of this book. I'm not sure why--it just didn't grip me. And I thought the rape of the windup girl of the title was meant to be titillating even as it intended to repel. It repelled me right out of this book.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jon des moines, IA, USA 06-02-10
    Jon des moines, IA, USA 06-02-10
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
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    4
    1
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    0
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    "Tedious x2"

    I agree with Tess.
    I haven't read the first two in the series and am unable to capture any meaningful flow from this book due to the frequent use of terms\names that are hard for me to keep track of.
    Possibly, I need to go back and start with the first book in the series.

    3 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer Indianapolis, IN United States 02-17-10
    Amazon Customer Indianapolis, IN United States 02-17-10 Listener Since 2004
    HELPFUL VOTES
    4
    ratings
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    14
    1
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    0
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    "I don't stop listening to books"

    I don't, but after five hours I did. I couldn't bring myself to care about a single character. I couldn't figure out who I was supposed to care about or why? The reader was great, but i just couldn't bring myself to give a rip about the story.

    4 of 13 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer Houston 07-20-10
    Amazon Customer Houston 07-20-10 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
    38
    ratings
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    82
    11
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    "Sorry, but no winner"

    The diversity of reviews for this entry is stunning. Are we listening to different books? Yes, the narrative is very rich, and no, I didn't have trouble with the foreign words and names. Reading (or listening to) SF does require a certain degree of mental agility as you are inherently dealing with the unfamiliar. Fair enough.

    No, the problem I have with this work is that, to paraphrase one reviewer, Bacigalupi doesn't seem to have looked at a science book dated after 1970. He blithely ignores existing non-oil-based energy sources in his determination to create his energy-starved dystopia. Ok, other authors have made larger leaps, but Bacigalupi even ignores basic physics laws in describing the stuttering motion programmed into his bio-engineered title character. Any Bio-engineer would immediately spot that such stutter-stop movements would automatically waste far more energy.

    Sorry, but this book takes the audience on a long, slow ride into a nonsensical world that literally does not compute. (With all that broiling sunshine, why isn't Thailand lousy with electricity?)

    I vote to mulch Bacigalupi.

    3 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    William 02-03-10
    William 02-03-10 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Imaginative but ruined by author's poor choices."

    To be fair, the story starts out extremely imaginative and interesting. However, I quit listening during the second rape scene. I was extremely disappointed by the writing, not that it took this turn, but that the author had to be so explicit in describing the rape scenes. I would think an author if this caliber and imagination can convey what he wants to without being so explicit. Not a story many women or men, for that matter, would enjoy unless they have sadist tendencies. Sorry but this books is better clssified as Sci-Fi SDM Porn. A waste of good talent.

    2 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ken Gray 07-25-13
    Ken Gray 07-25-13 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    29
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    Performance
    Story
    "THUMP,THUMP,THUMP"
    Any additional comments?

    I tried I REALLY tried. But to say this story takes a while to get going (like half the time) isn't really fair. I don't mind stories that take a while to get moving. I like back-story and learning about characters and the environment in which they live. So much so, that I rarely look at books under 12 hours and almost NEVER buy them under 10. It's not that it takes a while to get to the point, I just didn't care by the time I got there. I don't think that Jonathan Davis' lack lust performance helped it in any way either. The mono-tone drone didn't help me engage with the characters or story. I liked his work with Neil Stevenson and he does, what I believe, is a good job with Asian accents and inflections but it just wasn't enough for this book.I hate to but, I have to give it a pass.

    1 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    KP Oakland, CA 03-16-12
    KP Oakland, CA 03-16-12 Member Since 2016

    There is no Frigate like a Book To take us Lands away Nor any Coursers like a Page Of prancing Poetry – Emily Dickinson

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    Story
    "The Windup Girl"

    I wanted to like this book. It seemed like it would be exotic, and I was hoping that, like other good sci fi, it would throw light on human nature by examining it from an other-worldly perspective. ( I don???t read that much sci fi, but The Sparrow comes to mind.) Instead, it was boring and needlessly complicated with absolutely no psychological insight.

    For the work of keeping track of all those characters and pseudo scientific info, I expected to be rewarded with an interesting plot, complex characters, or some depth of emotion. Instead, the characters were all flat and unlikeable, and there were too many of them vying to be the main character. Many of their interactions didn???t make sense. Why did Anderson serve up the wind up girl to those horrible men after he seemingly cared for her? And was the main character, Emiko the wind up girl, supposed to have a soul or not? The jury is out on that one, and so it was hard for me to care about her because of that. Also, the narrator's phony Japanese accent for Emiko sounded terrible. I'd rather hear NO accent than such a silly sounding one; that added to my inability to care about Emiko. And the way the story ended for Anderson, who was at least ONE of the main characters, was meaningless as well.

    Then the plot??? there was way too much war-like posing and bombing and running around. At the end, when Emiko is finally on her own, the author makes that scene into only a brief epilogue! That???s when he really could have fleshed her out, so to speak, but it???s more like a plot outline here. And he throws in the Gibson scientist character, and it gets really (but briefly) outlandish then with no follow up or reasoning for it at all.

    I thought the whole thing was unsatisfying, and it amounted to next to nothing.

    1 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tamara 01-29-11
    Tamara 01-29-11 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    89
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    Overall
    "Hugo Award? You've got to be kidding me."

    This book was seriously pretentious. I think the author's description at the beginning where he mentions all the research he did gives a hint of what's to come. In trying to prove his understanding of the East, he mostly leaves the reader confused. It takes place after an environmental collapse, resulting in wars and other calamities. There are various groups of people ranging from the white shirts to the green bands and yellow cards. I couldn't quite figure out exactly how far in the future it's taking place (I think 300 years was mentioned), but it seems that more or less nothing has really advanced. Stranger still, electronic communication is strangely absent. The wind-up girl is really a mystery. They are able to genetically engineer her to organism during a rape and instill obedience, but they couldn't get her to walk correctly? I made it through the first 6 hours, but I gave up in boredom and frustration. Wishing you better luck...

    1 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Noah New York, New York 08-12-10
    Noah New York, New York 08-12-10
    HELPFUL VOTES
    138
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    173
    63
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    4
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    "Amazing (but brutal) novel, inconsistent reader"

    The Windup Girl is a revolutionary work of science fiction. It is one of the few books that transcends the genre, offering not just a compelling vision of a (dark, declining) future world, but a cast of deep, complex, ambiguous characters, and a very true-to-life outsider's take on the Thai culture. In other words, it rocks. If you don't listen to it, read it. Just be prepared for a very brutal, downbeat, heartbreaking story.

    Jonathan Davis, however, was a mediocre narrator. He kept switching the voices that go with each character, so that I kept getting confused as to who was speaking. His accents were also not amazing (granted, Thai and Japanese accents are difficult, but that just means one should err on the side of a lighter accent).

    All in all, despite the brutality of the story and the inconsistent narration, this was the second-best audiobook I have ever experienced (the best being Neal Stephenson's "Anathem"). I definitely recommend it.

    1 of 5 people found this review helpful

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