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The Rolling Stones Audiobook

The Rolling Stones

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Publisher's Summary

One of Heinlein's best-loved works, The Rolling Stones follows the rollicking adventures of the Stone family as they tour the solar system.

It doesn't seem likely for twins to have the same middle name. Even so, it's clear that Castor and Pollux Stone both have "Trouble" written in that spot on their birth certificates. Of course, anyone who's met their grandmother Hazel would know they came by it honestly.

Join the Stone twins as they connive, cajole, and bamboozle their way across the solar system in the company of the most high-spirited and hilarious family in all of science fiction.... It all starts when the twins decide that life on the lunar colony is too dull and buy their own spaceship to go into business for themselves. Before long they are headed for the furthest reaches of the stars, with stops on Mars, some asteroids, Titan, and beyond.

This lighthearted tale has some of Heinlein's sassiest dialogue - not to mention the famous flat cats incident. Oddly enough, it's also a true example of real family values, for when you're a Stone, your family is your highest priority.

©2009 Robert A. Heinlein (P)2014 Blackstone Audiobooks

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  •  
    David 02-01-16
    David 02-01-16 Member Since 2012

    Indiscriminate Reader

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    "Golden oldie of sci-fi"

    Heinlein's juveniles have always been among my favorite SF - I liked a lot of them more than some of his later novels written for adults. I read The Rolling Stones so long ago I barely remembered it, but some of it came back to me as I listened to it again as an audiobook.

    Alas, the years have diminished my fondness for this light-hearted space romp somewhat. While it was a fun adventure about a wisecracking, hyper-competent family of adventurers seeking their fortune (and something adventurous) out in the solar system, there isn't much to impress the modern SF reader about flying a rocket ship to Mars, Venus, and beyond.

    The Stones consist of Castor and Pollux, trouble-making teenage twins always scheming to get rich and prove they're the smartest people in any room, who drive most of the adventure with their original idea to buy an old mining ship. Somehow their parents are talked into this harebrained scheme, with a little manipulation by Grandma Hazel, who is a crusty old survival of the Lunar rebellion in The Moon is a Harsh Mistress and can continue to hold her own with anyone a fraction of her age. The Stone family is rounded out by teenage daughter Meade and their little brother.

    As in most Heinlein stories, everyone is super-competent: the twins have what nowadays would be considered a graduate-level understanding of mathematics, which their father, the moral center and patriarch of the family despite, by his own admission, having the lowest IQ, demonstrates isn't nearly good enough. Mrs. Stone is a doctor, Grandma Hazel is... well, Grandma Hazel, and even Meade, who does little more than fill in the "girl" box in the story, is smart and accomplished in a few domains.

    The Stone family is a quintessential upper-middle-class white family circa 1952, when this story was written, flying out into space under the wise and benevolent leadership of Father Knows Best. And while Heinlein works out starship physics and planetary travel in great detail (gotta love those slide rules that always make an appearance!), making this story the sort of crunchy, "believable" hard SF that would have thrilled young would-be space pioneers back in the 50s, obviously to us in the 21st century, the idea that people will ever be jaunting about the solar system in private spaceships the way pioneers used to go west with little more than a mule and a pack of supplies certainly seems naive.

    As an introduction to Heinlein's juveniles, with very little that is challenging or novel, but much to excite a young reader who's into space and adventure, I do think this book holds a worthy place in the canon of Golden Age science fiction.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Wayne Matthews, NC 12-22-15
    Wayne Matthews, NC 12-22-15 Member Since 2016

    I love espionage, legal, and detective thrillers but listen to most genres. Very frequent reviews. No plot spoilers! Please excuse my typos!

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    "I still love this book!"

    Heinlein first released The Rolling Stones 63 years ago in 1952 when I was nine years old. My grandchildren are now reading this and other novels in Robert Heinlein's juveniles (now called YA) series. This novels was intended for children in the 9 to 15 age range. It is a great science fiction story about the Stone family as they travel in their own space ship within our solar system. Like all Heinlein novels there are some funny situations and lines as well as some wise and thoughtful ones. I'm a bit outside the target age range, but I enjoyed The Rolling Stones!

    9 of 10 people found this review helpful
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    MidwestGeek 01-07-16
    MidwestGeek 01-07-16

    Love a good mystery, but don't care much for pure thrillers.

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    "Written for YA's, it is a space romp but dated."

    I don't read much sci-fi but bought this Daily Deal as I did recall enjoying Heinlein at a certain time of my life. It's not much of a story, but I'm not sorry I listened. Heinlein goes out of his way to explain concepts of elementary physics necessary to navigate and live on the moon or in space. I found the dialog stilted and the father an exceeding tiresome disciplinarian. The mother, a medical doctor, quietly goes about doing her own thing while seemingly deferring to her husband, as does her mother-in-law. The two teenage twin geniuses are the heart of the book, and I can imagine youngsters identifying with them. Given that it elaborates a vision of the future, it's funny in retrospect to hear them using slide rules and minding their decimal points. Published in 1952, it is even few years before I got my first slide rule. In retrospect, it's hard to believe that we used slide rules all the way through college in the mid-60's. It's a pity Heinlein didnt live to see the impact of LSI, the internet, and smart phones. It's also a pity I won't live long enough to see quantum computers, which may have an even bigger impact on technology than anything we've witnessed thus far. I also wish I could witness the revolution in medical practice that is already underway, moving it from a scientifically motivated guesswork to an informed application of fundamental biological science.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Frank 07-14-15
    Frank 07-14-15

    Ok,so I had the best intentions.I started listening for work, but now I'm re-discovering the classic sci-fi books that I read as a kid.

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    "Good story well told"

    This was a fun listen as I drove between appointments. A story of a family who buys a star ship and the adventures they find.... I just wish there was more to the story.

    34 of 42 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Townsend Pearland, TX, United States 12-21-15
    Townsend Pearland, TX, United States 12-21-15 Member Since 2015
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    "Dated, but still good fun!"

    Who remembers slide rules? Set aside any ideas about how the future turned out so drastically different from Heinlein's vision; read his early YA novels the same way you would H.G.Wells. Long ago, in an alternate universe.......

    The plot: a pair of brilliant twins and their brilliant family buy a space ship and set off on what is supposed to be a simple vacation but turns into an adventure.

    The Rolling Stones is very episodic: it comes across like a 1950s weekly 30-minute TV series. The highly improbable genius family is the stuff of fantasy. The mid-twentieth century sexism is apparent, though somewhat mitigated by two very strong female characters. There is a four-year old who is very poorly and inconsistently written: the kid plays chess but no one thinks it possible to explain that acceleration is going to be uncomfortable. (I allow that even bright 2-year-olds can't be made to behave on an airplane, but 4-year-olds can. Give the kid dramamine or the like, but the treatment used here seems extreme.) I'm a grandmother. I like 4-year-olds. This kid really tries my patience, and the family encourages him. Ugh.

    The main characters are twin teen-aged boys. Their relationship is interesting, and based on my observations of several sets of twins during my teaching years, I'd say it's done well. The way they play off each other is sometimes delightful, sometimes obnoxious, but generally realistic.

    The narration is only so-so. Pretty good for the most part but the high-pitched voice-breaking of one of the twins is annoying, as is the whiny 4-year-old. When I read the book I liked the mother, but in the audiobook her voice is so cloying I kept wanting to slap her. Weiner differentiates voices enough that there is never any problem knowing who's talking.

    Okay, a lot of criticism here, but I still enjoyed it. Heinlein got really crazy later on, and sexist to the point of nausea, but his early stories (up to 1960, pre-Stranger in a Strange Land) are delightful examples of how much fun sic-fi was in the 40s and 50s -- much like the Westerns of that period, uncomplicated, the adventure of life on the frontier, happy endings. It belongs in a different category than the sic-fi of today, not better or worse, just completely different, and (at least for those of us of a certain age) a lot of fun to revisit.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
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    girorv montreal, QC, Canada 06-14-16
    girorv montreal, QC, Canada 06-14-16 Member Since 2011

    To listen to a great book while I knit is heaven on earth.

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    "Cute with a Young Adult feel"

    My title kind of says it all. I had a good time listening to this . I think that all the author intended. Our heroes are 2 teenage boys and they act quite predictably. The family dynamics are feel good. This book was written some time ago and it feels like it. The reader is a great job.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
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    Grandmother librarian 12-20-15 Member Since 2016
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    "Dated, but very enjoyable children's book"

    This isn't a sophisticated, modern science fiction book, but I enjoyed it's humor and the predictions Heinlein made for life in the future.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jim "The Impatient" Springfield, MO, United States 08-29-16
    Jim "The Impatient" Springfield, MO, United States 08-29-16 Member Since 2015

    I am brutally honest. Popular, love everything they read, reviewers are scared to go neg. and risk their ranking. It's your money!!!

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    "TRAMP SPACE SHIP"

    NINETY FIVE INDEED, LAST WEEK YOU WERE EIGHTY FIVE.
    IT'S BEEN A HARD WEEK
    2009 IS THE RENEWED COPYRIGHT. The original copyright was 1952 and there was a condensed version in Boy's Life. I mention this, because I believe this should be a Sci-Fi Classic not a Contemporary. It is a great book, written before Heinlein got into Free Love and when he thought Family and learning were important. There is a lot of math and science in the book, but it is not a dry book. The math and science should encourage children of even today, to take their studies serious. It is also full of lots of humor. No laugh out loud funny, but funny anyways. It has a half way decent story and some great characters. Talk about women's lib, the mother is a doctor and the grandmother a engineer. The grandmother was my favorite character. The father is smart, but the least smart in the family. He knows it, but he has lots of common sense.

    HAND ME THAT SLIDE RULE
    It is dated of course, but still a fun and enjoyable book today. A book good for all ages and all genders. It includes slide rules, Boy Scouts, and Adventure Serials. AS LEGAL AS CHURCH ON SUNDAY.

    NORMAL, THAT'S A WORD WITH NO MEANING

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Angus Fort Collins, CO, United States 06-26-16
    Angus Fort Collins, CO, United States 06-26-16 Member Since 2012
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    "Father Knows Best meet Lost in Space"

    This is a relatively delightful piece from the author of Stranger in a Strange Land, Girl Friday and Starship Troopers. The Rolling Stones, sans Mick and Keith, is a story about the family Stone living in the Lunar Colony. Sporting a family of six plus Grandma they purchase a small cargo cruiser to tour the solar system and have adventures while discovering things.

    Comes across like Father Knows Best meets Lost in Space with real science fiction-fact. The rockets are all NERVAs using Hydrogen as the propellant of choice. They use Hohmann Transfer Orbits to maximize fuel efficiency and experience real zero gravity issues.

    A fun work and though dated still reads true. Three out of five entertainment units.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Gordon 09-28-16
    Gordon 09-28-16 Member Since 2012
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    "Classic young reader Heinlein at its best."

    I'm recommending this to all readers; although it's geared toward younger readers. Pedantics will find the strong father figure objectionable, only until they realize that the strong independent female charcters really control the family.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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