We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
The Mote in God's Eye | [Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle]

The Mote in God's Eye

The Mote In God's Eye is their acknowledged masterpiece, an epic novel of mankind's first encounter with alien life that transcends the genre. No lesser an authority than Robert A. Heinlein called it "possibly the finest science fiction novel I have ever read".
Regular Price:$22.99
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

Writing separately, Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle are responsible for a number of science fiction classics, such as the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning Ringworld, Debt of Honor, and The Integral Trees. Together they have written the critically acclaimed best-sellers Inferno, Footfall, and The Legacy of Heorot, among others.

The Mote In God's Eye is their acknowledged masterpiece, an epic novel of mankind's first encounter with alien life that transcends the genre. No lesser an authority than Robert A. Heinlein called it "possibly the finest science fiction novel I have ever read".

©1991 Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle; (P)2009 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

  • All-Time Best Science Fiction Novels (Locus Magazine)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.9 (4268 )
5 star
 (1349)
4 star
 (1633)
3 star
 (863)
2 star
 (268)
1 star
 (155)
Overall
4.0 (2704 )
5 star
 (999)
4 star
 (959)
3 star
 (508)
2 star
 (167)
1 star
 (71)
Story
4.0 (2663 )
5 star
 (952)
4 star
 (1071)
3 star
 (462)
2 star
 (106)
1 star
 (72)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Michael New Orleans, LA 07-08-12
    Michael New Orleans, LA 07-08-12 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2233
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    285
    144
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1377
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "An Original and Fresh Classic, Despite Its Age..."

    Niven and Pournelle have collaborated in the past, but none as fantastic and addictive as this unique take on alien contact. They've built an entirely different culture, with different motivations, desires, and ideals. Throw in a nightmarish hidden agenda (which side you ask? I'm not telling!), as well as a ancient secret that may mean the destruction of one race over the other.

    If I say more about this awesome audiobook, I'll ruin it for you, and I won't do that. So, take a leap of faith, trust me, and BUY THIS AUDIOBOOK. It's stunning in scope, sweeping in depth, and reads so well, that you'll easily recommend this to others, just like I'm doing to you right now!

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    aldwin Baguio City, Philippines 12-07-09
    aldwin Baguio City, Philippines 12-07-09 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
    12
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    39
    8
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "can't stop listening"

    Found myself on the edge of my seat and can't wait on what will happen.

    A very nice story for Sci-Fi Fans!

    9 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tim Valenta AZ, USA 03-04-10
    Tim Valenta AZ, USA 03-04-10 Member Since 2012

    Tim

    HELPFUL VOTES
    62
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    72
    25
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    2
    0
    Overall
    "Good book, slightly empty"

    I got this book by suggestion of the TWIT podcasts.

    My basic conclusion is that the book has some interesting things to talk about, but in audio form it's somehow hard to follow things that are said.

    Many of the non-essential characters are too similar, such as the crewmen who are always contributing to conversations. I still have absolutely no idea who's who. It doesn't ultimately matter, but it's frustrating to know in the back of your mind you have no idea who half of the cast are.

    After finishing the book, I had to listen to the first segment all over again because of the above problem. Had I read the words on a page, I might have remembered that the opening quote is by a man later introduced in the story. I might have understood better the early hints and discussions concerning Rod's royal family. Somehow I didn't properly digest that fact until the third part of the book.

    Going into this book, you should keep in mind that the story is not meant to dazzle you at thrilling pace with a home run ending fit for pop culture. The book is very much the story of first contact with an alien race. Note that that's very different than being a story about a life-and-death war with an alien race which the humans almost lose their homeworld. If you understand the kind of story being told, the story is excellent.

    My only wish is that the writing style would be more explicit about certain things. After the book takes you through in-depth description of a major event, 2 minutes after the event supposedly ends a character suddenly reveals that the event actually extended hours longer with bits it never even suggested had happened. I sometimes found myself actually tilting my head in my car and saying "..wha?" aloud. I had to rewind a minute or so and listen again to make sure I wasn't going crazy, that I really didn't fall asleep during my commute.

    Good book though. I give it my rating with the glass half full, not half empty.

    24 of 29 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Paul Tulsa, OK, United States 10-12-11
    Paul Tulsa, OK, United States 10-12-11
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Mote in God's Eye first meeting with aliens"
    Would you listen to The Mote in God's Eye again? Why?

    wonderful interplay between humans and aliens, with the aliens holding a secrete that could destroy mankind, with only hints given to the humans of their danger Excellent book!


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Kevin Reiner, common man with an attitude


    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    K. Krieger 07-12-11
    K. Krieger 07-12-11 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    74
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    232
    19
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    3
    0
    Overall
    "Excellent !"

    I don't often give 5 stars but didn't have to think twice about giving them to this book. One of the best SF books I ever read (and I have read many)

    Couldn't put it down and was sorry when it was over already.

    Excellent narrator too, although it took some getting used to in the beginning.

    Highly recommended !

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Alex 06-29-11
    Alex 06-29-11

    alex_799

    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    5
    5
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    1
    Overall
    "Excellent Reading"

    This massive novel is a tour de force of first contact stories. The reader does it justice, using accents and inflections sparingly and when appropriate. I first read this book when I was in my teens, and I've read it several times since, but it never quite came alive for me the way it did with this reading. This 24-hour read actually felt too short to me. Highly recommended!

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    GEVR 05-24-11
    GEVR 05-24-11
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    12
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Excellent through and through."

    This is one of my favorite science fiction novels and now one of my favorite audiobooks.
    The themes and the writing as superb, as is to be expected from Niven and Pournelle, and despite what other reviewers might say, the narration is also excellent; a mix between dramatization and plain reading that adds a layer of interest and helps differentiate the many characters in the story.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David 04-26-12
    David 04-26-12 Member Since 2012

    Indiscriminate Reader

    HELPFUL VOTES
    1414
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    291
    287
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    277
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "The aliens are more interesting than the humans"

    I've read a lot of Niven and Pournelle's collaborations over the years, and at the height of my Very White Space Opera phase (i.e., when I was a teenager with no taste and liked anything with spaceships and aliens in it) Niven was one of my favorite authors.

    The Mote in God's Eye was their first collaboration, and never having read it before, I was expecting something like Footfall. It kind of is, but of course it was written over twenty years earlier. This shows mostly in the fact that like most 70s science fiction, computers are still big clunky shipboard installations, and interstellar communications are formatted like telegrams and decrypted on tape machines. Other than that, though, the SF holds up pretty well; Niven and Pournelle have always written relatively hard SF, and their close attention to astrophysical, engineering, and biological detail makes this a book that, aforementioned computer/communications issues notwithstanding, reads like a fairly contemporary work.

    Sci-fi-wise, that is. Character-wise... oh boy, that's another matter.

    So, let's start with the setting. It's the Empire of Man, some millennial after humans left Earth and began colonizing the stars. There have been collapses and previous empires before now, and the current Empire actually has technology inferior to what bygone space empires had. But in all these centuries, no sentient alien race has ever been discovered. Then an Imperial warship encounters a probe launched from a star system that is a "mote" in a stellar nebula; the probe contains a dead alien pilot, and results in a ship being sent to investigate the system it came from. The crew discovers a race which the humans call "Moties," who appear to be friendly and peaceful and highly civilized. They are actually superior to humans, mentally and technologically, their only disadvantage being that they haven't yet figured out how to build working faster-than-light starships, so they are still trapped in their home star system.

    The rest of the book is mostly told from the human point of view, but sometimes switches to the Motie one. We learn that the Moties, well, aren't so peaceful (surprise!) and they have a few secrets they are trying to keep secret from the humans.

    As a First Contact novel, this is a very good one. The aliens are alien, and don't fall into any easy roles. They're not malevolent, per se, and individual Moties can be friendly (and refreshingly, they are individuals - Moties, like humans, don't all think alike or subscribe to the same philosophies and racial strategies), but they are definitely a threat. When the humans finally figure out the truth, they face a real moral dilemma.

    Where The Mote in God's Eye fails, though, is characterization of the non-aliens. The humans are all straight, and I mean straight, out of 70s Central Casting. You have heroic square-jawed aristocratic naval officer Roderick Blaine, ruthless planet-killing Admiral Kutuzov, the sleazy bad guy Horace Bury who of course is a Muslim Arab, and Lady Sally Fowler, a noblewoman, anthropologist, designated love interest, and the only woman in the book, who at one point informs the Moties that humans have birth control technology but "decent women don't use it." We're supposed to admire the generally lawful and benevolent Empire of Man, even though it's about as socially progressive as Victorian England, and like Victorian England is in the middle of colonizing other human worlds by force. The stereotypes would have been less grating if the characters weren't also so flat; they did little but play their roles.

    So, this is good science fiction, but hardly great literature. If you want interesting aliens and an examination of civilizational ethics, with a decent amount of spaceship action thrown in, enjoy, but there isn't a lot of depth, nor characters you're really going to care about.

    9 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jacob Donley Pekin, IL, United States 07-28-13
    Jacob Donley Pekin, IL, United States 07-28-13 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
    11
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    61
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great Story that's a bit Slow at Times"

    THE MOTE IN GOD’S EYE is a science fiction novel written by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. The main premise of the story is the first contact of humans with a nonhuman alien civilization and all the problems, conflicts, and potential benefits that may come with that encounter. This first encounter comes in the future with technology that is far advanced to that which we have today and in a society that is centuries in the future in comparison to ours, where an Imperial Monarchy exists for humans in an interplanetary civilization.

    While some science fiction creeps heavily on the fiction side when it comes to science, this novel does a good job of incorporating factual scientific theories into the story. Things such as how the 'Motes', the alien civilization, would have or could have evolved are presented in a scientifically plausible way. Also, though the drive and the shield technology talked about quite often in the novel are not explained, other things such as Trojan points, societal technology advancement, and how gravity can be simulated on space ships are quite accurate in theory.

    Overall, the story, while slow at timesand bogged down with periods of explanation, is quite riveting when it arrives at the Imperial politics, rebellion, interaction with the alien civilization, and sequences where naval officers are in a fight for their lives in space or trapped behind enemy lines. I would recommend this novel to any science fiction fan that wants a 'hard' sci-fi read.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ken Mercadante 11-02-12 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    17
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    142
    43
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    4
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A classic, but shows signs of age."

    Definitely a first-contact story with considerable depth. But at the same time the human perspective was a little hard to latch onto, and the overall story was a little dry. But it had moments.

    The narration was okay, but this book needed someone more expressive to bring the material life. Or maybe it was the material itself, I don't think I've heard this narrator elsewhere, so it's hard to judge.

    Overall: worth the listen just for the alien culture.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
Sort by:
  • knuckle
    United Kingdom
    4/13/13
    Overall
    "The one the got me hooked"

    This is the book that kept me past my free trial of audible. Interesting book about humanity's first encounter with an extra terrestrial intelligence.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    Ashington, United Kingdom
    4/7/13
    Overall
    "An absolute cracker"

    It is amazing how SF has changed over the years - I remember reading this book when I was a teenager and was fascinated by the "scary alien" and the biological solution. Modern SF has a much greater technological base, because of the inventions and discoveries we have made since have pushed the boundaries of the fantastic.



    All that said, this book still really intrigued me and I was hooked. It is read well, the characters came alive and I remembered how much I admired Horace Bury.



    Thoroughly recommended.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Fuentes Perivancich Pamela
    2/19/12
    Overall
    "Good book!"

    I really enjoyed this space saga; very intricate story, I didn't get what the Mote problem was until they virtually spelled it to me. Well written and very well read, and very entertaining. This reminded me a lot of good old classics like Bradbury. I can absolutely reccommend this title to sci-fi lovers.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Nick
    Harrogate, United Kingdom
    4/16/11
    Overall
    "Spectacular"

    Had the book for years and never read it. Recently re-read Ringworld and spotted this on Audible so thought I'd give it a go.
    Stuck with it as admittedly it's tough for the first hour but then it got me and I listened whenever I had chance.
    You soon adjust to the reader and the story just takes over anyway.
    Fantastic! Any scifi fan must get this.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Matt Davis
    UK
    10/16/10
    Overall
    "Wonderful story spoiled by bad narration."

    The tale of the Moties and their destructive secret is a wonderful read but a tiresome listen in this version. The narrator gives it his best shot, but it's a classic case of how not to match a narrator with a book.

    Get the dead-tree version and enjoy a truly amazing tale. This iteration may put you off Niven and audiobooks in general, which would be a bad thing.

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • MR
    St Neots, United Kingdom
    5/23/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Extremely dated, very disapointed."

    Fifties American military, society and attitudes in space thousands of years in the future. This book was an extreme disappointment to me after hearing its reputation.

    The technology depicted is laughable... "pocket computers" that whirr and clunk, telexes still in use "Hello mum STOP This was a terrible book STOP Help me STOP". Coding machines that use punched cards!
    There is literally *NO* fore-thought about what technology must be like to get to where they are. Completely missed the computing & communications advances. Fair enough it was written in the 70's but to expect everything to the identical as 70's America is simply ridiculous.

    Next, the attitudes...
    Women are portrayed as simply being there for reproduction, careers dont matter, babies do.
    Women only ever think about sex and marriage a thousand years from now apparently.
    Men are macho military characters, evil schemers or power maniacs

    ...And don't get me started on the Scottish accent!

    Basically, dont buy it... it insults your intelligence.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Christian
    EDINBURGH, United Kingdom
    7/23/12
    Overall
    "Great book - poor performance."

    I have read this book a while ago and been absolutely blown away by it. It is certainly one of the greatest classic SciFi novels ever written. Unfortunately this narration is pathetic at best. Inconsistent pace and intonation and the narrators poor attempts on impersonating different characters (especially his idea of a scottish accent) make it almost impossible to follow the story. If I had not read the book before listening to it, I would not know what it was all about.
    This audiobook is a complete waste of time and money - do not buy.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.