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The Lost Fleet: Dauntless | [Jack Campbell]

The Lost Fleet: Dauntless

Captain John "Black Jack" Geary's legendary exploits are known to every schoolchild. Revered for his heroic "last stand" in the early days of the war, he was presumed dead. But a century later, Geary miraculously returns from survival hibernation and reluctantly takes command of the Alliance fleet as it faces annihilation by the Syndics.

Appalled by the hero-worship around him, Geary is nevertheless a man who will do his duty. And he knows that bringing the stolen Syndic hypernet key safely home is the Alliance's one chance to win the war. But to do that, Geary will have to live up to the impossibly heroic "Black Jack" legend.

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Audible Editor Reviews

Why we think it's Essential - If there's ever a space war, the Lost Fleet series could well be the military's manual. Author Jack Campbell, a former Navy officer, infuses the first book, Dauntless with the kind of details that make "Black Jack" Geary's futuristic exploits seem as if they're ripped from today's headlines. Narrator Christian Rummel gives this blood-and-guts adventure just the hard edge it needs. —Steve

Publisher's Summary

The Alliance has been fighting the Syndics for a century, and losing badly. Now its fleet is crippled and stranded in enemy territory. Their only hope is a man who has emerged from a century-long hibernation to find he has been heroically idealized beyond belief.

Captain John "Black Jack" Geary's legendary exploits are known to every schoolchild. Revered for his heroic "last stand" in the early days of the war, he was presumed dead. But a century later, Geary miraculously returns from survival hibernation and reluctantly takes command of the Alliance fleet as it faces annihilation by the Syndics.

Appalled by the hero-worship around him, Geary is nevertheless a man who will do his duty. And he knows that bringing the stolen Syndic hypernet key safely home is the Alliance's one chance to win the war. But to do that, Geary will have to live up to the impossibly heroic "Black Jack" legend.

BONUS AUDIO: Author Jack Campbell explains how the legend of King Arthur, the Greek historian Xenophon, and other writings influenced the Lost Fleet series.

Get Lost! Listen to the rest of the Lost Fleet series.

©2006 by John G. Hemry writing as Jack Campbell; (P) 2008 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"The best novel of its type that I've read." (David Sherman, co-author of the Starfist series)
"Military science fiction at its best." (Catherine Asaro, Nebula Award-winning author of Alpha)

What Members Say

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  •  
    crazybatcow East Coast, Canada 03-02-13
    crazybatcow East Coast, Canada 03-02-13 Member Since 2012

    I like Jack Reacher style characters regardless of setting. Put them in outer space, in modern America, in a military setting, on an alien planet... no worries. Book has non moralistic vigilante-justice? Sign me up! (oh, I read urban fantasy, soft and hard sci-fi, trashy vampire and zombie novels too)

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    "Perfect example of decent military sci-fi"

    It is military science-fiction - definitely science-fiction in that they are in spaceships, in the future. Definitely military in they they are at war - in their spaceships which are treated like naval ships would be, complete with marines and officer rankings - with a human enemy.

    It is a bit space-opera-y in that the characters will be recurring in future installments, and the overall plot encompasses multiple planetary systems and characters. The story doesn't really end at the end of the book - just the first leg of the journey was completed, not the entire trip.

    There is a bit of character development in the main character, though the rest of them are pretty much cardboard cut-outs. Mostly, they are there for the main character to reflect his own thoughts off. Fortunately the main character is actually pretty interesting. He has a bit of conflict both within himself ("will power corrupt me?") and with the other ship captains ("is he corrupt?" or "will he get in my path en route to glory?")

    I quite liked the story, and how Black Jack's history was brought into the story, and how this history is used to make him who he is. I have bought the next couple in this series.

    The narration is un-obtrusive (i.e. at points I sorta forgot it was narrated). There is no graphic anything (sex, violence or language). And, while there is a tiny bit of moralizing (i.e. "this" is right/moral), it was not excessively so.

    27 of 32 people found this review helpful
  •  
    JLM Oakland, CA, United States 05-22-14
    JLM Oakland, CA, United States 05-22-14 Member Since 2014
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    "Stop Explaining..."

    I really wanted to like this. I wanted it to be a rip roaring space adventure-hopefully with some identifiable or with some luck, interesting characters. But not really....'Black Jack' Geary is not lovable, he's completely self obsessed, so you are always hearing him repeating lots of inner dialogue about 'woe is him'...because everyone worships him... We also hear,ad nauseum, how far away everything is in space and exactly what the time lag is for each and every maneuver. Sounds like he's describing a video game screen or trying to 'teach' us about what it would be like, really, to fight at faster than light speeds. These never ending reflections during 'battles' actually makes the fights strangely disjointed: They fire on the enemy and...now let's stop and remember, "they really fired this over 3 minutes ago because they are 3 light minutes away, so it's already happened....and Now -back to the action....
    Didn't work for me- and I love good space opera, give me some Old Man's War, or some Larson over this any day.

    7 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Paul 05-28-13
    Paul 05-28-13 Member Since 2014

    Sci-fi/Fantasy geek :)

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    "Just The Facts, Rinse, Repeat"

    I didn't care for this book at all. In fact, I got so disillusioned with it that I almost quit listening several times, but kept going so I would be sure I had given it a fair try. The only good thing was the obvious knowledge that the author has about naval inner-workings. There were no descriptions about the look-and-feel of anything or anyone. While some authors can overdo this aspect, this author gave us none of it. It was clearly written by someone who is a very straightforward thinker who thinks explaining how anything looks, smells, feels, etc. is a waste of time. Same for the characters, at the end of the book you know about as much about them as you did by the end of the 2nd chapter.

    The author repeated for many chapters that the hero is reluctant, to the point where I physically yelled out "I get it already, I get it!"

    The author showed us all of the thoughts in the head of the characters, then made us sit through reading them again as they spoke their thoughts to the other characters.

    The characters are mostly simplistic and one-dimensional. There is almost no mystery, at least none that lasts more than about 5 minutes.

    So, if you like being spoon-fed a dry story from simplistic characters without getting emotionally invested and without seeing/touching/hearing/tasting/smelling anything, this is the book for you.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Deano Thousand Oaks, CA United States 11-04-12
    Deano Thousand Oaks, CA United States 11-04-12 Member Since 2012
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    "Kind of tedious."
    What disappointed you about The Lost Fleet: Dauntless?

    I'm don't think I'll continue past the first book in the series. There's not too much depth to the characters and the plot seems like it's going to be a long, drawn out journey home.


    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 05-31-12 Member Since 2015

    I value intelligent stories with characters I can relate to. I can appreciate good prose, but a captivating plot is way more important.

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    "Childish and unpolished"

    I was shocked by how bad this book was, considering the incredibly good reviews it has received.

    There is something incredibly amateurish about the way the plot unfolds. There is no nuance to be found anywhere. Here's the main character: he is unambiguously good. Here's the enemy: they are unambiguously evil. Here are all the other ship commanders: they are ALL UNBELIEVABLY stupid.

    It felt as though the dialog was written by a high school student. There was no subtlety to be found anywhere. All the characters spoke like robots, and explained (and re-explained) every action or decision with mechanical precision. You kind of expect ever conversation to end with: "Okay, reader: did you get that? are you following?"

    The only good thing I have to say about the book is that it was clever in its handling of time-dilation as it would relate to space battles. But this alone was not enough to save this train-wreck of a plot.

    Don't waste your time or money on this book.

    [spoilers below:]

    The book is about a commander who has been given control of a fleet which is part of an army which, in the span of just 100 years has lost all institutional discipline... never mind that those traditions stretch back for millenniums, and that all of history shows us that even the most primitive armies thrive on discipline in the absence of any other tools.

    Our commander quickly shows us that he's an idiot, as in the face of unforgivable insubordination, he fails to discipline the captains working under him. And we're told that this fleet is accustom to "loyalty purges"... so why the commander doesn't use that tool is a mystery.

    I don't know anything about commanding an army, but it took me about 2 minutes to figure out that what he needed to do was execute some of his more insubordinate captains, and replace them with people who followed him out of blind hero worship. Unfortunately, the main character never learns this lesson, so he spends the entire book trying to play politics with his own fleet. As a result, he never gets to properly train them, and in battle they are so undisciplined that it actually costs lives and ships. And even after all this, the main character STILL doesn't rule with an iron fist- which is CLEARLY the ONLY thing that can save the fleet.







    7 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kelt Ashland, OR, United States 03-12-12
    Kelt Ashland, OR, United States 03-12-12 Member Since 2015
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    "Disappointing"
    Any additional comments?

    This book has a great premise, but it gets completely bogged down in worthless details. Not useful details, like how many ships in the protagonist or enemy fleets (unbelievably never mentioned), but relentless descriptions of people's facial expressions. Usually

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Justin Berryville, AR, United States 08-09-13
    Justin Berryville, AR, United States 08-09-13 Member Since 2013
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    "Kinda boring, mostly tedious, and frustrating"
    Would you try another book from Jack Campbell and/or Christian Rummel and Jack Campbell ?

    Probably not, I foresee more of the same.


    What was most disappointing about Jack Campbell’s story?

    The main character had no character. He was like a cardboard cutout of some idealized naval officer, with zero personal motivations or character traits. He also handles the political situations in his fleet with a disappointing lack of chutzpah. He never says what he's really thinking when speaking to other officers, especially the annoyingly stupid ones who oppose his command of the fleet (I say stupid because they are stupid, not because they oppose him). By the time the book was finished, I was aching for a good old fashioned public smack-down of the leader of this adversarial group. The final few scenes even played like a lead up to a big charismatic speech where Black Jack would lay down the law and put some ridiculously insubordinate officers in their places. It never happened. What a let down.


    What do you think the narrator could have done better?

    I think the narrator could have given the main character some more vitality, he sounds like an awfully dull person, not a charismatic legendary hero.


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    The space battle, the one space battle in the book, was well described and interesting in the way it played out. Sort of.


    Any additional comments?

    The book makes it clear that in the hundred years of warfare since Black Jack was turned into a popsicle, everything ever known about military tactics has been abandoned or forgotten. I find it somewhat arbitrary and highly unrealistic that two militaristic cultures, fighting one another for a hundred years, would both settle on the same tactic of just plowing into one another until one side is completely wiped out. That's pretty stupid. We're supposed to believe that Black Jack is, literally, the only person in the universe that has any kind of grasp of tactical maneuvering. Many of the officers in his fleet are constantly pissed (and bitching about it in staff meetings), that they haven't been allowed to make straight shot suicide runs at enemy ships. I get that it's been a long war, which in my mind would encourage developments of new strategies and tactics; I mean, that's the history of warfare right there. Side A comes up with something unique, so Side B has to develop a counter tactic. Warfare does not move in the opposite direction of "Beat with Club until Dead".

    The other part of the book that was extremely frustrating was the near complete lack of discipline of the fleet officers. They argue and fight with each other constantly, and basically pick and choose the orders they want to follow, and only on one occasion does this result in any kind of disciplinary action by the Fleet Commander Black Jack. And then, in this one case, he handles it extremely delicately, afraid to annoy any of the other officers. I would have stripped the bastard in question of his command, and busted him to ensign. He was firing on a group of friendly marines, and refused orders to cease fire like four times! Bam! Hang him from the Yard Arm I say!

    Meh. It was a frustrating experience listening to the whole thing. I really like Space Navy stuff, this was a poor showing in that genre. Sorry Mr. Campbell, I wanted to like this book, but the characters were just no bueno. I liked the premise though, as a consolation.

    14 of 17 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ethan M. Philadelphia 04-23-08
    Ethan M. Philadelphia 04-23-08 Member Since 2005

    On Audible since the late 1990s, mostly science fiction, fantasy, history & science. I rarely review 1-2 star books that I can't get through

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    "Fun military SF that falls prey to cliche"

    This book is solid enough military science fiction, delivering some dramatic space battles and heroic actions, but at the same time falls prey to almost every genre convention. It delivers some of the most awkwardly motivated descriptions of how technologies work that the science fiction world has to offer; the main character is (of course) a hero from another time, providing an excuse for yet more info-dumps from the author, characterization tends to be pretty one-dimensional, and so on. Not terrible stuff, but it started to drive me a bit crazy after awhile.

    In fact, it reminded me constantly of Rosenfelder's essay "If all stories were written like science fiction stories":

    "Do you think we'll be flying on a propeller plane? Or one of the newer jets?" asked Ann.

    "I'm sure it will be a jet," said Roger. "Propeller planes are almost entirely out of date, after all. On the other hand, rocket engines are still experimental. It's said that when they're in general use, trips like this will take an hour at most. This one will take up to four hours."

    ... if the tedious explanations don't bother you, and you like military SF, this is a fine choice. Otherwise, you can do better.

    17 of 21 people found this review helpful
  •  
    breckoz 12-15-12
    breckoz 12-15-12 Member Since 2015

    Audiobook Junkie... Love all types of Science Fiction

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    "A Great Start To A Space SciFi Series"

    This audiobook ranks up there with the Prince Rogers, Miles Vorkosigan, and Honor Harrington series. There seemed to be more space battles in this story than the others; so if that is what you like in a space novel, then this book is for you. However, the best part is a strong character whom you can cheer on. Captain John Geary is a man out of time having recently been rescued from stasis after a long time lost in space. He is a battle hero from his days and is worshiped by many of those in the fleet that picked him up. However, timing is bad for Geary as the fleet has headed into an ambush deep in enemy territory. This is the line of events we are thrust into at the very beginning of the book and may be a little confusing at first. This story is about how Captain Geary must take hold of the fleet and save it from destruction with the goal to get everyone back home to safety. Enemies and difficulties may not only lie out in space but in the fleet itself. A long time of war has changed the hearts and minds of those that serve in the Alliance fleet and Geary must come to terms and live up to everyones expectations or find control of the fleet to slip out of his hands. The reader did an excellent job. I had no problem distinguishing characters. This is one of those books that made me want to download the follow up right away.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Aaron Westwood, NJ, United States 08-31-13
    Aaron Westwood, NJ, United States 08-31-13 Member Since 2014
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    "Idiocracy in Space, Almost as Funny"
    What disappointed you about The Lost Fleet: Dauntless?

    It's hard to believe that a war fought by so many people hell bent on self destruction could possibly last 100 years. Perhaps in the previous 99 years, a very large battle is fought every 10 years that literally destroys every space going warship in each fleet. Then, the next 10 years are spent rebuilding said fleets. Rinse, repeat. This must be the case given that modern tactics require throwing all assets into a battle with little to no thought given to tactics. Any future fleet officer with an IQ greater than 60 is either forcibly removed from command or assassinated. Such a waste that the writer attempted to make his main character look like Caesar by making everyone else as head-smackingly dumb as Gomer Pyle. The space battles are quite thrilling and seem realistic enough despite the unbelievable carelessness off the enemy or for that matter all of the captain's subordinates.


    Would you ever listen to anything by Jack Campbell again?

    I have. I'm a space fight junkie and the space battles in these books were good enough to keep me running back for more. Up to a point anyway. Careful though. The last book in the series was the weakest.


    What about Christian Rummel and Jack Campbell ’s performance did you like?

    The narration was great. Not surprisingly, the main character is voiced powerfully and believably. The rest are passable which is quite impressive given the material.


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Lost Fleet: Dauntless?

    Every scene where the captain is talking to anyone but himself.


    Any additional comments?

    If you've read this book, watch the movie Idiocracy.

    9 of 11 people found this review helpful
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  • William
    7/22/09
    Overall
    "the lost fleet book 1"

    Don't be fooled by talk of physics, The Lost Fleet; Dauntless book 1 is pure space opera. You've got good guys, bad guys and plenty of battles and things blowing up. And don't forget the love interest (ok you do have to wait to book 2 buts its fairly obvious). The premis of the book is fairly simple - the Alliance fleet was suckered into a trap and badly mauled. All the leaders have been murdered and it up to a hero to save the day. The book is exciting and well paced. The physics of space travel are fairly consistant and true to life from what i remember of the subject. On the negative side, the way the book and author goes on about it can grate at times, after all the author didn't seem to mind making up the faster than light stuff, so why preach? The only other main flaw, to my mind, was that i found it hard to believe that a military force would lose it capability to use tactics. That aside, its well worth a listen to.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • MR
    STAINES, United Kingdom
    4/8/13
    Overall
    "Hard SF Naval combat in space."

    As the author says in his preface, this is a retelling of the classic 'sleeping hero returns in his country's hour of need' Arthurian style story - but, of course, 'In Space'. Captain John Geary finds himself in command of a battered fleet needing to get home the hard way, but helpfully also in possession of fleet combat skills lost to his side by a century of war. He also finds his command weakened by the shining example of his own tactics in his last battle, and his 'outdated ideas' on morality.



    The most unusual thing about this series is the hard scifi treatment of relativistic speeds and distances. Fleets of ships must act like WW2 bomber squadrons - as a lattice of fields of fire. Commands take time to reach the edges of the formation. Ships take time to turn. Arriving ships take time to be seen. etc. It works rather well.



    The narrator is excellent - managing to make all the characters distinctive and instantly recognisable.



    The story's narrative is entirely from Geary's POV, and is well written but maybe lacks the masterful touch - possibly because it is so simply done.



    This is a reasonably short book, made shorter by the fact that it is gripping enough to blast through in no time. Fortunately there are plenty more in the series.



    Recommended.







    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    8/24/11
    Overall
    "Best SciFi I've read in years"

    As they used to say a "rip roaring yarn". Superb piece of space opera. No deep philosophical navel gazing in this book, just good old space warfare and petty political backstabbing.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Peter Death
    London, U.K.
    5/25/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "good space opera"

    a great space opera / military story. easy to follow with a small number of indepth characters.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Meranda James Bucks
    malvern, uk
    5/4/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Enjoyable Spacitime (maritime adventure in space"

    loved it and bought the following book it was easy listening and fun regards Meranda

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    Whetstone, United Kingdom
    12/12/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A truly stunning read about a space journey home."
    What did you like most about The Lost Fleet?

    In The Lost Fleet: Dauntless, you are introduced to Captain Black Jack Geary and the one hundred year war between the Alliance and the syndicates.

    Still recovering from his stint in survival sleep, he is thrust into command of the Alliance fleet when all higher ranked officers are killed, he is forced to try and save the fleet using long forgotten tactics in an endless journey home.

    Jack Campbell is an excellent author who knows how to keep the suspense going whilst telling a great story that the reader just has to keep reading.

    The way he describes the space battles is a skill that I just envoy as it is so simple but brilliant at the same time.

    Alison Laura Goodman


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Lost Fleet?

    The way he describes the space battles


    Which scene did you most enjoy?

    The fact that the characters are human and show it with all of their faults.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    No as I enjoyed the whole book.


    Any additional comments?

    No.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • John
    Saltdean, United Kingdom
    8/2/11
    Overall
    "The Lost Fleet: Dauntless"

    Sadly I found this audio book very predictable and unoriginal. I am a big fan of Alastair Reynolds style of mind blowing techno and wild character settings, and thought this may be similar... but this book is just like out takes of old Battlestar Galactica or Star Trek. I could not even finish it!

    1 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Robert
    Marlow, United Kingdom
    6/21/12
    Overall
    "Should be in the children's section"

    Great book, if you're a 12 year old boy.

    Self gratifying 2 dimensional tedium.

    I think that about sums it up.

    0 of 3 people found this review helpful

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