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Revelation Space | [Alastair Reynolds]

Revelation Space

Nine hundred thousand years ago, something annihilated the Amarantin civilization just as it was on the verge of discovering space flight. Now one scientist, Dan Sylveste, will stop at nothing to solve the Amarantin riddle before ancient history repeats itself. With no other resources at his disposal, Sylveste forges a dangerous alliance with the cyborg crew of the starship Nostalgia for Infinity. But as he closes in on the secret, a killer closes in on him because the Amarantin were destroyed for a reason.
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Publisher's Summary

Nine hundred thousand years ago, something annihilated the Amarantin civilization just as it was on the verge of discovering space flight. Now one scientist, Dan Sylveste, will stop at nothing to solve the Amarantin riddle before ancient history repeats itself.

With no other resources at his disposal, Sylveste forges a dangerous alliance with the cyborg crew of the starship Nostalgia for Infinity. But as he closes in on the secret, a killer closes in on him because the Amarantin were destroyed for a reason. And if that reason is uncovered, the universe - and reality itself - could be irrevocably altered.

©2008 Alastair Reynolds; (P)2008 Tantor

What the Critics Say

"One of the best books of the year." (Science Fiction Chronicle)
"Ferociously intelligent and imbued with a chilling logic - it may really be like this Out There." (Stephen Baxter, co-author of The Light of Other Days)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.8 (1881 )
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4.0 (1370 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Ryan Somerville, MA, United States 03-10-12
    Ryan Somerville, MA, United States 03-10-12 Member Since 2005

    Gen-Xer, software engineer, and lifelong avid reader. Soft spots for sci-fi, fantasy, and history, but I'll read anything good.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "well-plotted but emotionally unsatisfying"

    As hard SF goes, Revelation Space is definitely on the “harder” end of the spectrum. It's a got a complex, ambitious plot, with all sorts of far future tech casually treated as normal fixtures of reality. The novel's vision of dark, mysterious alien powers, which are behind the disappearance of civilizations whose ruins are found throughout the galaxy, is intriguing. The protagonists are the "gritty, complex" sort, driven by their own personal agendas, and not unwilling to manipulate or even betray the others. Reynolds does a good job of writing clearly, conveying a sense of the underlying science without over-examining it. He also deserves credit for writing some convincingly tough female characters, without making a big deal about it. The plot wasn’t uninteresting.

    On the minus side, Revelation Space suffers (in my opinion) from a flaw common to other hard sci-fi, namingly that its intricate plot machinations and cerebral focus don't leave much breathing space for the emotional aspects of the story. Though the main characters are credible enough, it’s hard to care about them, and I found myself wishing that Reynolds would slow down on the intrigues, shipboard politics, and space battles, and offer a little more of the awe and wonder that I read science fiction for in the first place. For example, there's a scene towards the end of the book in which a character penetrates a vast alien artifact, but Reynolds barely gives any attention to what it looks like, or the character's reactions. Talk about a wasted moment. Though it’s been years since I’ve read Dan Simmon’s Hyperion, *he* made such scenes into page-turner material.

    Unfortunately, the audiobook experience adds another flaw: the reader doesn’t leave any space between scene switches! This led to numerous rewinds on my part, whenever I wasn't paying close attention. The character backstories get a little confusing.

    In sum, your opinion of this book will probably depend heavily on whether or not your tastes already include a lot of hard SF (Vernor Vinge, Peter Hamilton). If so, there’s plenty of smart stuff in Revelation Space. However, for other readers, the lack of much emotional resonance might override the other selling points.

    8 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tango Texas 10-08-13
    Tango Texas 10-08-13

    Two great passions - dogs and books! Sci-fi/fantasy novels are my go-to favorites, but I love good writing across all genres.

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    "A worthwhile slog through fog"

    I have two pieces of advice for anyone considering this audio book:

    1. Don't start Alistair Reynolds with Revelation Space. My first Reynolds was House of Suns and I think that's a great one to start with although I haven't yet read all of his work. If I had started with Revelation Space, I don't think I would have finished this book much less read any of his other work and THAT would be a shame.
    2. Find a good plot summary before you start listening to this book. This is one that would be tough to follow in print and even tougher on audio. A good plot summary helps tremendously. I would write one, but fortunately, Jefferson has included a good one in his review so I'd point you there. (Thanks, Jefferson.) There are some others on the internet if you are looking for more.

    Revelation Space was my third Alistair Reynolds novel and it was challenging! However, having read Pushing Ice and House of Suns, I knew I wanted to read most if not all of Reynolds work because I really like his writing. And, Revelation Space is the introduction to Reynolds "signature" universe so I knew I needed the introduction even if it was hard.

    Listening to this book felt a lot like trying to put together a 10,000 piece jigsaw with no picture or border pieces to work with. The first two thirds of the book are totally DENSE with descriptions and concepts and it doesn't seem to quite fit together. The pieces of the plot I could understand were intriguing, but it felt like much of it was just going past me. And, it doesn't help that these are not the best Reynolds characters. All the characters are interesting in a way that unusual things are interesting, but not sympathetic because you can't quite understand their motivations or their goals. They aren't really good or evil - most of them just seem rather duplicitous (lots of hidden agendas here) and amoral so there is really no one to root for/against through most of the book. I will admit that by the end, I was really rooting for Volyova; she is clever, thinks on her feet, and by her standards she's loyal. One of the things I've come to appreciate about Reynolds is that he writes some very good female characters. Although John Lee provides distinct character voices with the narration, it is not as much help as it might be because he uses so many thick accents that it is actually hard to understand some of the dialog.

    If you feel like you are wading through a swamp in dense fog through much of this book, you wouldn't be alone, but it is worth the effort to stick with it. In the final third of the book, it's like Reynolds finally steps in and takes control; he hands you the border pieces and gives you the completed picture to work from and suddenly all the pretty, but meaningless pieces start to snap together in this amazing puzzle and it's quite a stunning picture. You really don't understand much of the plot or the characters or the universe until the final third of the book, but when it culminates, it makes for a grand conclusion.

    Not the best Reynolds novel, but worthwhile if you are up to the slog through the initial fog.

    12 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jefferson 12-13-12
    Jefferson 12-13-12 Member Since 2010

    I love reading and listening to books, especially fantasy, science fiction, children's, historical, and classics.

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    "Sometimes Corny, Often Awesome, Modern Space Opera"

    In the year 2551 as Revelation Space (2000) begins, Dan Sylveste, the 215-year-old, famous science family scion, colony leader, and archeologist, is pushing his team to excavate an obelisk made by the extinct Amarantin, despite the approach of a terrible "razorstorm," because he wants to learn why "the Event" (apparently a stellar flare) suddenly ended the alien civilization some 900,000 years earlier on the planet Resurgam. Meanwhile (in 2543), the small "Ultranaut" crew of Nostalgia for Infinity, a city-sized, ancient and decaying "lighthugger" starship, including Ilia Volyova, the only crew member currently awake, is on its way to Sylveste to make him cure their captain of the Melding Plague (which merges human cells and machine nanotechnology into cancerous hybrid shapes). Meanwhile again (in 2524), Ana Khouri is a successful assassin hired by the idol rich of Chasm City on planet Yellowstone to relieve them from ennui, when the mysterious Mademoiselle has her infiltrate the crew of Nostalgia for Infinity as their new Gunnery Officer to communicate with the starship's apocalyptic weapons) so that she may hitch a ride to Resurgam and assassinate Sylveste.

    Reynolds interweaves the three story lines as he brings Sylveste, Volyova, and Khouri ever closer together in time and space. The three point of view characters might at first seem to be unsympathetic: an arrogant and obsessive scientist, a shanghaiing and loner starship weapons expert, and a coolly efficient assassin. Yet Reynolds forces us to care for them in their various difficult situations by gradually revealing the humanity lurking inside them.

    With its varied humans (conjoiners, ultranauts, chimerics, hermetics, etc.) modified in various ways (longevity techniques, prosthetics, implants, neural transformations, software simulations, etc.) and its enigmatic aliens (Shrouders, Jugglers, Inhibitors, etc.), Revelation Space pushes the boundaries of the human (physically, culturally, mentally), revels in the sublime wonders of the universe (space, time, stars), and unfolds an exciting story.

    Reynolds' imagination is impressive: he conjures up numerous scientific developments, technological devices, alien species, galactic histories, and cultural extrapolations, ranging from the cool to the sublime. And he's good at evoking creepy and fascinating phenomena, like the malevolent Sun Stealer, the vast starship Nostalgia for Infinity, the fate of the alien Amarantin, and the "world" Cerberus orbiting a "neutron star."

    John Lee does his usual efficient job reading the novel. Although his handling of Reynolds' dialogue may rub some listeners the wrong way (like his snide intonations in French, Russian, or Japanese accents), I mostly enjoyed his style and base narration and feeling for the story and characters, and was horripilated by his channeling of the creepy Sun stealer.

    There are occasional corny lines in the novel like this exchange: Khouri: "I'm not sure I like this." Volyova: "Join the club." And sometimes I suspect that Reynolds could have told his story with less dialogue. And I'm still trying to decide whether the climax and resolution of the novel are satisfyingly transcendent or disappointingly explanatory. And I think his House of Suns is a better book. But there are plenty of neat descriptions in this book, like, "Volyova was silent until they reached the human nebula that was the Captain. Glittering and uncomfortably muscoid, he less resembled a human being than an angel which had dropped from the sky onto a hard, splattering surface." And plenty of memorably sublime or horrible scenes that make Revelation Space worth listening to for fans of the dark and sublime space opera of the likes of Iain Banks.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David 05-17-11
    David 05-17-11 Member Since 2012

    Indiscriminate Reader

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    "Good but slow slower-than-light space opera"

    Alastair Reynolds is one of the leading lights writing this generation's space opera, and his perspective (European, a PhD in Astronomy) gives his stories a very contemporary feel. I like the hard SF setting, with slower-than-light starships and ancient, dead civilizations instead of living aliens, and parts of this book were quite spooky and sinister. When the crew is prowling the corridors of the huge spaceship Infinity avoiding "rats" and other creatures controlled by a hostile intelligence, it felt like one of those old sci-fi horror movies.

    Revelation Space is full of great ideas, especially in the conclusion, where it turns out that the small and large intrigues of the main characters have all been leading them to a confrontation on a much larger scale than they imagined: a threat that could end the human race. I like high-stakes stories like this. So this book was basically a recipe for everything I should love in a sci-fi novel.

    So why only 3 stars? Because another crucial ingredient for me (and this is very much my own preference, which is why other people may love this book) is characters who feel real and who I like at least a little. Reynolds's characters aren't as wooden as those of some other hard SF writers, and he gives them plenty of background and motivation and personality, but after describing all those things, he doesn't spend much time letting them live and breathe and reminding you why they are interesting. They just go about their business executing the plot. As soon as the book ended, I was thinking about the story and the technology, but the characters were mostly forgettable.

    Unfortunately, there were also parts of the book that just plain bored me; listening to the audio, sometimes my mind drifted and I didn't catch (or care about) all the details. Also, I just did not like John Lee's narration. He gave everyone an accent, not always distinct ones, and I didn't like all the voices.

    7 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Matthew Richmond, VA, USA 03-26-10
    Matthew Richmond, VA, USA 03-26-10
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    "So big and so good."

    I loved this book. It was my first from audible.com, and I was not only immediately sucked into the story, but I also really enjoyed the narration. Regardless of what other reviewers have said, I found the accents and dialects to be well done, unlike many contrived and corny variations. John Lee's voice acting is subtle and properly punctuated, without all the histrionics that usually ruin audiobooks. Moreover, although lengthy, Reynolds moved the plot along well while dipping into details that thoroughly paint just the right picture. The description and detail is vivid and expansive, and I frequently felt as though I was wandering the Nostalgia for Infinity spacecraft when some corridor or facility was described. The characters were compelling and interesting, and you really want to know each one's story as the plot thickens. And with no real "good guy," I still empathized with the various protagonists, wanting them each to succeed at their respective goal - even when it meant contradicting or conflicting with other characters' motivations. Really great. I'm suggesting it to all my SF fan friends, and moving on to Chasm City.

    9 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Timothy College Station, TX, United States 07-05-11
    Timothy College Station, TX, United States 07-05-11 Member Since 2011
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    "Narrator is awful, couldn't finish it."

    I'm a big sci-fi fan, and was hoping I would love this series (of which this is the first book), and could look forward to a lot of good listening ahead. Unfortunately I was very disappointed and couldn't finish this. It's hard for me to judge the book itself, because the narrator is so bad.

    1. He gives very little distinctiveness to each character's voice, making it very hard to follow who's talking.
    2. There is no pause or any other signal of a change in setting/time/place/etc. This book jumps between very different settings and the reader just reads the text without pause. Combined with the lack of distinction in the voice characterizations, this means that often I will have been listening for 15 min. or more before suddenly realizing that the some major transition took place several paragraphs ago and my mental picture of what's going on is completely wrong. Generally, this means I'm lost most of the time - not a pleasant listening experience.

    I'm sorry to say I will not be trying any more of Alastair Reynolds audiobooks because of this.

    12 of 15 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Carrie Turner Salt Lake City, UT United States 04-19-14
    Carrie Turner Salt Lake City, UT United States 04-19-14 Member Since 2011
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    "Terrible audio book. I do not blame the author."
    What disappointed you about Revelation Space?

    The editor and the narrator were HORRIBLE. I have heard this is a really good book but I will never be able to finish because of this crappy performance.

    There is absolutely no indication that the narration has moved from one character story arc to another. It is very confusing. At one moment you are following along, the next you have no clue what is going on. Then you realize you have moved to a separate story arch. There isn't even a pause in the narration. You could believe they are in the same sentence when they have crossed chapters.

    Unfortunately due to eye issues I won't be able to read this book. I have heard it is a good book from people who have read it.


    Has Revelation Space turned you off from other books in this genre?

    I LOVE this genre


    Who would you have cast as narrator instead of John Lee?

    ANYONE. He is the only narrator that I refuse to listen to again. (I have 150 audible books and maybe 50 more audio books not through audible). He ruined A Feast of Crows by George R R Martin so bad they sent it back and had Roy Dotrice re-narrate it. Unfortunately I listened to the John Lee version. At least I can go back and listen to the remake with Roy Dotrice who is an excellent narrator.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Nurlip 04-09-13
    Nurlip 04-09-13 Member Since 2014
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    "If you like space opera's this is a good one but.."
    Any additional comments?

    ....be prepared to invest some time in the series as each book is long (a 'plus' for me) and the connecting plot ('long plot') is strung out loosely throughout each book. This isn't a 'con' for the series but its not as direct as Peter F Hamilton's Commonwealth Saga/Void Trilogy and could be an adjustment depending on what you are used to.

    I found this to be a good book but i think it was a little tough to listen to b/c the of the way the author used the character names. Maybe it was just me but I found myself confused by characters being called different names at different times w/o being properly linked back to the 'common' name used throughout the rest of the book. Mainly this happened when the author switched from the common last name to the first name in dialogue. Perhaps knowing that upfront, listening to the book will be easier for you.

    Other than that, the story was very entertaining and John Lee did an excellent job. At this point i hardly feel its necessary to mention Lee's performance b/c they are a staple of any audiobook. I don't have any doubts about the 'listening' aspect when i see its John Lee.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jim "The Impatient" Springfield, MO, United States 07-19-12
    Jim "The Impatient" Springfield, MO, United States 07-19-12 Member Since 2015

    I will listen to NO boring book. Old Fav's,Card, King , Hobb. New Fav's, Hill, Scalzi, Sawyer, Interested in Lansdale, Crouch, Konrath

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    "Envious"

    I envy those with the IQ and concentration to be able to follow this story. You are certainly on a higher plain then myself. AR shows that he is very intelligent and has a very strong vocabulary.

    I have been reading Sci-fi for thirty years, but I don't have the ability or stamina to keep track of what is going on in this novel. This is like learning a foreign language. Even thought this is the first of a series it seems like you have walked into the middle of something. There are lots of science terms. The vocabulary is not only deep, it is British English, not American English. Just as I think I know what is happening the characters change. I never could figure out the plot or story or reason for the book.

    To make it even more confusing John Lee has an alien sounding voice. He does accents but not voices, most characters sound the same. When changing from one scene to the next there is no pause. Some scenes change in mid sentence. Lee has done this in other books.

    One of the people I am following likes Terminal World, so I will probably try that at a later date. If it is not better then The Prefect, then I will have to give up on AR.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Colin Detroit 02-19-10
    Colin Detroit 02-19-10 Member Since 2015

    Thanks Audible for your continued support of "This Week in Tech" over at TWiT.tv

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "must read the other books after this one"

    OK so it goes without saying that if you read this book you have to read the other 2 (Redemption Ark, and Absolution Gap) as well as these ones (The Perfect[which is a prequil to all the all], and Chasm City[which is a prequil to RS])

    do you like Peter F. Hamilton? - they you should like these books

    Revelation Space starts off with three seemingly unrelated narrative strands that eventually meet and merge as the novel progresses. This plot device is characteristic of many of Reynolds' works.

    Its the year 2524 on Resurgam, a planet considered a backwater on the edge of colonized human space. Dan Sylveste, an archaeologist, leader of the colony, and wealthy scion of a prominent scientific family, leads a team excavating the remains of the Amarantin, a long-dead, 900,000-year-old civilization that once existed on Resurgam. As a violent dust storm threatens to temporarily shut down the excavation, Sylveste discovers new evidence that the entire Amarantin race was wiped out in a single mysterious cataclysm, which happens to coincide with the Amarantin's advancement to a starfaring culture.

    As Sylveste and the crew of the Nostalgia for Infinity approach Cerberus, Sylveste realizes the massive celestial body isn't a planet at all but rather, a massive technological beacon, aimed at alerting machine sentience to the appearance of new star-faring cultures. It is this beacon, Sylveste belatedly realizes, that alerted a machine intelligence known as the Inhibitors to the presence of the Amarantin, and ultimately caused the demise of that race.

    14 of 18 people found this review helpful
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  • Martin
    Inerness, United Kingdom
    4/10/13
    Overall
    "Start of a fantastic tale.."

    I love this book, just finished it and getting ready to download the sequels (and prequels) set in the same universe. The Narrator is fantastic and I have listened to a lot that he has done, great job done on the narration here and elsehwere by the narrator, who I find very easy to listen to.... I found the following on the Authors website which I think it is worth sharing as the chronology of the publishing dates does not follow the chronology of the story - I really want to pick up where this one leaves me..... so from the Authors website.......... "Of my books to date, five are set in the same universe. The reading order isn't that critical, in my view, but it probably improves things to read REVELATION SPACE, REDEMPTION ARK and ABSOLUTION GAP in that sequence. The other related books, CHASM CITY and THE PREFECT, as well as the collections DIAMOND DOGS, TURQUOISE DAYS and GALACTIC NORTH, can be read at any point (or in fact, not read at all)."

    I hope that someone else finds that info from Alastair Reynolds as useful as I have done - if you like Sci Fi, this series is for you... Aliens, Ancient Relics, super weapons, super humas, Ai, cyborgs, vast time scales, vast distances, vast wars, mystery, plot twists, great characters.......this has all that and some :) happy listener.

    6 of 8 people found this review helpful
  • S. Morris
    London, UK
    4/24/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Disappointed"
    Would you try another book written by Alastair Reynolds or narrated by John Lee?

    This is the first book from Alistair Reynolds I've read having previously read several sci-fi titles from Peter F Hamilton. I felt I wanted to broaden my recent foray into the realms of sci-fi and the sample of Revelation Space was alluring and seemed to hint at intrigue and wonder.

    I have to say that having just finished Revelation Space I was left feeling unsatisfied.

    I felt the plot was rather convoluted and sometimes confusing which also seemed to take very long to get anywhere. The writing was articulate and assured but I really felt Reynolds style far too verbose with often unnecessary reams of dialogue which often tended to slow, confuse or break the flow of the narrative and seemed to just be there to pad out the book in places.

    Over use of metaphor or analogy at times too just added to the feeling of unnecessary detail. Everything moved at a much faster pace in the last quarter or so of the book but the reader was taken on a very round about route to get there. Of course, the journey is part of the story, but I found that Peter F Hamilton accomplished this in a much better way with his more direct style of writing which gave the books from him I've read a much more readable and enthralling narrative.

    I couldn't say that I particularly liked any of the characters either or felt any real empathy or sympathy for them.

    I will give the follow up to Revelation Space - Redemption Ark a go as I don't think one title is fair in judging an author.

    A word on the narration; I like John Lee and he has done sterling work on many other epics I've read. However, I think the production of this title could've been better. Several of the main characters all done with French accents. This was a bit irritating after a while and I would've thought that as these were the main characters for the most part that the narration would not give them accents at all and instead focus on trying to make the sound of the voices different to aid in discerning who was talking - not an easy task at times between the Sylvest and Calvin characters which sounded identical to me and was only made worse by Reynolds style of often having long dialogue exchanges between characters and not letting the reader always know who was doing the talking.

    Reynolds is a clever writer and sometimes too clever because exotic and complex scientific principles are expounded to explain certain things which I felt only served to further confuse the reader or at least throw difficult to digest or visualize concepts at the reader rather than either simplifying the premise or at least not hanging key plot elements on ideas most people simply do not understand.

    Of course, techno-babble is a part of most sci-fi stories to one degree or another and it would be unfair to criticise Reynolds for this in itself. However, other writers either present the concepts in a more digestible way or don't resort to the assumption that quantum physics is a subject all readers are familiar with.

    Can I recommend Revelation Space? Well, if you're an Alistair Reynolds fan and like his style of writing then I'm sure you will like it if, like me, you're not familiar with his work and are thinking of trying this story, then I can suggest you try it but cannot recommend it.


    Has Revelation Space put you off other books in this genre?

    No.


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    Yes.


    Could you see Revelation Space being made into a movie or a TV series? Who would the stars be?

    No.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • PatM
    Marlow UK
    11/11/13
    Overall
    Performance
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    "In two minds"

    This was a good story, some elements where very imaginative, the technological developments where believable and a nice resolution of the fermi paradox. Overall I enjoyed it, however some things did not sit right with me. The author ends each chapter with a POV character on some form of a cliffhanger. The next chapter starts with the said POV character doing something completely different, drinking some coffee, having breakfast, pondering some thoughts... we only discover what happened through a series of flashbacks. After a while this just gets irritating rather than being clever. But overall a good story and worth picking up. I didn't enjoy the narration very much though. John Lee does not do this justice at all. His accents are corny, and he sounded to me like one of those narrators of old WWII newsreel clips, which used to be shown before a movie! I will probably continue with the other books in the Revelation Space series, however I'll be reading them rather than listening to another John Lee narration.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • David
    IPSWICH, United Kingdom
    5/22/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Very disappointng"

    I love audio books and have listened to loads but this was the first one where the narration spoilt the story so much so that in the end I gave up after around 3 hours.

    I might still have carried on if the story had grabbed me but I lost interest and didn't really end up caring what was happening. It all seemed a bit of a ramble and very disjointed. It may well have come together further in the story.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    Glasgow, United Kingdom
    3/24/13
    Overall
    "Terrible Narration!"

    2hr 45mins is all I could manage.



    This is my first Alastair Reynolds and unfortunately it will be the last one I listen to narrated by John Lee. The narrator starts every sentence loudly then gets quieter which means he is either too loud or quiet (if using headphones). I found myself constantly adjusting the volume. More importantly, I struggled to tell which character was talking as dialogue between people sounded so similar. The story jumps around space and time which is fine but there are no pauses in the audio to make you aware of this so you are left playing catch up all the time



    This is the first time I have written a review as I am normally quite happy how the scoring system produces accurate results. This time however, I felt the need to warn people. I currently have 98 audio books in my library and this is the first I simply couldn't finish.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Yevgeny
    West Drayton, United Kingdom
    11/28/12
    Overall
    "Textbook feel with sleep inducing narration"

    The whole book feels like a set-up for the other 2 books in the trilogy. The story only really starts in the last few chapters with certain plot points left ignored in the end.



    I have to agree with some other reviewers, the narration for 2/3 of this book feels like sitting though a lecture. the story jumps between different times and places without so much as a pause for breath or a change in tone. So it is hard to figure out if you are still on the same planet or even in the same century.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Gillian
    Pickering, United Kingdom
    9/21/12
    Overall
    "Deeply disappointed"

    Having enjoyed other works by Alastair Reynolds, I anticipated hours of listening pleasure with this audiobook. Sadly, despite trying several times to get into the story I have found myself neither interested in the plot nor the characters. On the good side, of course, it saves me from bothering to download the sequels.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • AndyMackenzie
    5/8/10
    Overall
    "rev space"

    great story and characters can't wait to hear next bit of the story. narration very good too.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Tom
    West Wickham, United Kingdom
    11/19/09
    Overall
    "Excellent story & superbly narrated"

    This is, I think, easily the best of Alastair Reynolds' "Revelation Space" stories. His style is to weave a set of interlocking narratives together in a very detailed way, building up to a terrific climax and the manner in which he draws the detail of his SF world as it were is very convincing. Translates very well to audio format. Excellent narration too. Stongly recommended.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Roger
    Cheadle, United Kingdom
    3/7/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "You just need to pay attention"
    Any additional comments?

    There are some books that have very simple/predictable plot lines. You can casually listen to these on the move and not miss anything if you get distracted. By contrast Revelation Space requires listening effort, but is worth it. I initially listened too casually and about one and half hours in I had to accept that I did not really know what was going on, so... I started again. I am glad I did.The narration is very good, but you need to pay attention, particularly in the first third of the book, the scenes switch with no warning. In the end I enjoyed this aspect.Interesting story, good science and original.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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