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Red Mars | [Kim Stanley Robinson]

Red Mars

Winner of the Nebula Award for Best Novel, Red Mars is the first book in Kim Stanley Robinson's best-selling trilogy. Red Mars is praised by scientists for its detailed visions of future technology. It is also hailed by authors and critics for its vivid characters and dramatic conflicts.

For centuries, the red planet has enticed the people of Earth. Now an international group of scientists has colonized Mars. Leaving Earth forever, these 100 people have traveled nine months to reach their new home. This is the remarkable story of the world they create - and the hidden power struggles of those who want to control it.

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Publisher's Summary

Winner of the Nebula Award for Best Novel, Red Mars is the first book in Kim Stanley Robinson's best-selling trilogy. Red Mars is praised by scientists for its detailed visions of future technology. It is also hailed by authors and critics for its vivid characters and dramatic conflicts.

For centuries, the red planet has enticed the people of Earth. Now an international group of scientists has colonized Mars. Leaving Earth forever, these 100 people have traveled nine months to reach their new home. This is the remarkable story of the world they create - and the hidden power struggles of those who want to control it.

Although it is fiction, Red Mars is based on years of research. As living spaces and greenhouses multiply, an astonishing panorama of our galactic future rises from the red dust. Through Richard Ferrone's narration, each scene is energized with the designs and dreams of the extraordinary pioneers.

©1993 Kim Stanley Robinson; (P)2000 Recorded Books

What the Critics Say

  • Nebula Award, Best Novel, 1993

"Generously blending hard science with canny insight into human strengths and weaknesses, this suspenseful sf saga should appeal to a wide range of readers." (Library Journal)
"The ultimate in future history." (Daily Mail)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.6 (1031 )
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3.8 (474 )
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3.9 (461 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Tim Br|hlGermany 09-01-09
    Tim Br|hlGermany 09-01-09
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Well researched, needs work by a real writer"

    Some books are long for a reason. This isn't one of them. You could remove two thirds of the words from Red Mars without losing anything. The background of hard science is excellent and fascinating but Robinson can't write his way out of a paper bag. He can't create characters, can't do dialog, can't plot and writes love scenes like a 14-year-old. If it could be completely reworked by someone who can write this could be an excellent book.

    6 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Phillip Lino Lakes, MN, United States 10-01-13
    Phillip Lino Lakes, MN, United States 10-01-13 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Good story w/ outdated science"

    After reading several series focusing on sci fi war, it's nice to listen of a more mellow book heavy on science. There are only 3 issues with the series: (1) Richard Ferrone's performance is completely w/out emotion or conviction, it's like listening to someone reading the phone book; (2) the books show their age in outdated science; and (3) the Mars colony is founded in 2026, we won't land on Mars before 2050 at the rate we're going, and that really depresses me. Robinson never clearly never foresaw the bush years.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jan Encinitas, CA, United States 11-05-10
    Jan Encinitas, CA, United States 11-05-10 Member Since 2007
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    "Tedious"

    Although there are some interesting descriptions in this book, they are WAY too long and get in the way of the story. I found the book so tedious, I simply didn't finish it, which is very rare for me.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Angela Knoxville, TN, USA 10-09-09
    Angela Knoxville, TN, USA 10-09-09 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A true masterpiece"

    Red Mars (and The Mars Trilogy in general) asks big questions: How can we start over and recreate society, taking out the bad stuff and saving the good stuff? Can we escape history and remake ourselves into something that overcomes oppression of women, slavery, racism, greed, militarism, environmental destructiveness? Can we turn our society into a means for giving every member of that society a chance to achieve his or her own potential? These are big questions; they can't be answered with bumper sticker slogans. It takes a lot of detail and careful, thoughtful discussion to address them. So while a lot happens in this series, it isn't Star Trek. Problems aren't easily resolved. Situations are never black and white. The characters change, grow, and even forget how they got to the present.

    For readers who like a lot of meat to chew over, these books are probably among the greatest written in the 20th century - obsessively researched, thickly layered with meaning and analysis; the whole series is something that you can listen to time and again, and hear something different every time. The characters are archetypes; even their names express who they are - but they are also real people, with real emotions, amazingly and skillfully brought to life. The issues discussed are both a comment on the present (and history) and, in the best tradition of science fiction, an analysis of future possibilities. I can't recommend the entire series more highly for the reader who enjoys this sort of thing. But be forewarned - there are bad reviews here, and I'm guessing they are from people who were looking for something different - lots of plot and action, perhaps a little less analysis. I enjoy those books too, so I'm not saying that as a criticism of those who didn't find this to their liking. I'm just saying that there are plenty of other books that fill this role. The Mars Trilogy is something else entirely.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brandon Aurora, CO, USA 08-10-09
    Brandon Aurora, CO, USA 08-10-09
    HELPFUL VOTES
    10
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    "slow"

    I am sure the book is good, But it is slow. A lot of intricate details that do not add to the story.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Steven Hudson, WI, United States 07-31-11
    Steven Hudson, WI, United States 07-31-11
    HELPFUL VOTES
    15
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    "RED planet"

    The physics are way off. This book is more about communism and marxist dogma than science fiction.

    4 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jef Austin, TX, USA 04-25-08
    Jef Austin, TX, USA 04-25-08 Member Since 2002
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Wake me when something happens"

    I love this genre. Loved Ben Bova's story of Mars. Bought this because it was a Nebula Award winner. Must be good, right? This story went nowhere. It was a longwinded description of people living on Mars. Nothing much happened, except for a little anti-terraforming plot that was anti-climactic. There wasn't even much in the way of character development in all those hours of nothing.

    10 of 18 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Bill W. WA 06-29-14
    Bill W. WA 06-29-14 Member Since 2010
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    "A great book, but a poor reading"
    Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

    I have read the book before and enjoyed listening to it as an Audiobook.


    What other book might you compare Red Mars to and why?

    There are a number of sci fi books that cover similar territory, such as Mars, Moving Mars, and The Moon is a Harsh Mistress.


    Would you be willing to try another one of Richard Ferroneā€™s performances?

    I would look for other narrators before listening to another book read by Richard Ferrone. This book, with a large international cast of characters, calls for someone who could do at least basic accents to differentiate the characters. Ferrone doesn't attempt this. Even if you forgive that, he often puts emphasis in strange places that obfuscate the meaning of the words. He also clearly does not have a background in the sciences and much of his technical vocabulary is mispronounced. For a book with as much technical vocabulary as this, that gets really annoying.


    Do you think Red Mars needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    It has one (Green Mars). It also as a prequel (Antarctica), which is unfortunately not available as an audio book.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David Halethorpe, MD, United States 05-17-14
    David Halethorpe, MD, United States 05-17-14 Member Since 2010

    Indiscriminate Reader

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "The first Mars colony"

    Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars trilogy is well-regarded by SF fans, but it didn't really live up to the hype for me, though it's an excellent entry in the hard SF genre. Robinson's prose is not as lyrical as Ray Bradbury's, but it's not as dry as Ben Bova's either. Red Mars seems to synthesize elements from all of Robinson's predecessors — it's a Heinleinesque adventure at times, with hard SF infodumps, but actual characters, and shout-outs to every author who's ever touched Mars, including Burroughs.

    Red Mars is the tale of the first Martian colony, and covers a couple of generations of history. The "First Hundred" who established the original settlement become larger-than-life, almost mythical figures to those who follow after them, but as Mars begins to be taken over by political and economic factions bringing old issues of exploitation and oppression (followed by resistance and terrorism) from Earth, the Hundred are just as conflicted and prone to squabbling and working at cross-purposes as all the other settlers.

    Early on, there is a huge debate over terraforming Mars, eventually becoming a conflict between the "Reds" and the "Greens." Eventually other cultures arrive on Mars and have their own ideas of what it means to be a Martian settler. Muslims make up a substantial segment of the population, as do Russians and other nationalities, all wanting to have an equal stake in Martian society.

    The ending shows the surviving members of the Hundred witnessing what happens after decades of emigration and development on Mars, with much of what has been built up brought down by an uprising among the children of Mars.

    If you are a space exploration geek, and especially if you are one of those who still dreams of a Mars expedition in our lifetime, then Red Mars may fire you up with a realistic view of what emigration to Mars might actually look like. It is almost certainly not an accurate picture of what will actually happen, should we ever get that far, but it's a realistic picture of what could happen.

    I give this book 4 stars for being one of the best Mars books out there, but not 5 stars, because the story and the characters just did not grab me enough to wonder, "What happens next?"

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    jessica MINNEAPOLIS, MN, United States 04-16-14
    jessica MINNEAPOLIS, MN, United States 04-16-14 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "excellent and it sat in my library for 6 years"

    I bought all three of these books years ago and HATED Red Mars. Never finished it and I tried several times. It was boring and way too dry and sciencey. I wasted a small fortune.

    Well last summer I was listening to an old ITunes play list and Green Mars popped on at the end of something else. I was in the middle of a project and wasn't going to stop to change it. The recording started in the middle, talking about how plants survive winter and deal with salinity- a subject lately dear to me, and I was drawn in completely.

    I have listened to the whole series now and I cannot imagine how I didn't like it all those years ago. Its really not very sciencey, I mean sure .. a bit... but the characterizations and the story do not rely on the science. There is much, much more of politics and as much of magic as there is of science in this series.


    The performance is great

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 11-20 of 56 results PREVIOUS1236NEXT
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  • Jason
    LondonUnited Kingdom
    4/23/09
    Overall
    "Boring"

    I note that it is highly rated by many people but I found it over-long with stereotypical characters one couldn't empathise with. The book is often commended for its well researched detail but the amount of detail acts as padding and gets in the way of the story - an encyclopaedia may have lots of well researched detail but that doesn't make it a good novel.

    12 of 13 people found this review helpful
  • Nigel
    Malmesbury, United Kingdom
    8/12/10
    Overall
    "Epic scope, pedestrian delivery"

    Let's start with the positives: the audio production of this recording is excellent and the narrator is top notch.

    The book itself is epic in scope and tells the story of the settlement and terraforming of Mars in great detail. As far as I can ascertain, the author's research is impeccable and the descriptions of Martian geography and scientific processes are inspired.

    So, what's the problem?

    Well, there's the length, and there's the pace of the story. Even if it were only half its current length, this would be a big book. To sustain such a long narrative, you would hope for interesting characters, lively prose and plenty of incident and excitement. Sadly, all of these ingredients are absent.

    The story unfolds at a glacial pace and the author studiously avoids anything approaching adventure. There are storms, but everyone survives them without too much difficulty. There are many journeys, all of them long, during which little or nothing happens. A mystery is solved in a dull and perfuctory fashion.

    Events do finally take a more interesting turn in the final third of the book, but even so, there is too little danger and too much talk.

    The prose is functional and competent but nothing more. The characters are flat and two-dimensional and given to delivering set speeches on scientific and political topics. Many of the minor characters seem to be there solely to provide information dumps.

    There is plenty of New Age philosophising and cross-cultural apologetics along the way, all of which is no doubt very worthy, but this listener soon tired of it and longed for something interesting to happen. Some sections of this book sound like an attempt at dramatising whole articles from Wikipedia.

    So: a long book which is well read and which has some fascinating scientific detail, but which offers little in the way of excitement or interesting characterisation.

    I love science fiction, but I'm afraid that I found 'Red Mars' very dull.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Danielle
    Broendby StrandDenmark
    9/7/09
    Overall
    "Big Snooze"

    The books flits about from one (of the many characters) to another without going into depth and allowing you the chance to empathise. This makes their petty squabbles as to how the planet should be handled irrelevant to the reader. You never really get to understand the reasoning behind each characters stand point only their actions as to what they will do to protect their way of thinking. I also bought the sequels Green and Blue - and it doesn't get any better or more interesting.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Ozzymandias
    Mistworld
    9/26/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "I'd rather read an encyclopedia"

    As a young boy I loved reading about the solar system and looking at the beautiful pictures in encyclopedias. Some time ago I was recommended this series by a fellow researcher and I have to say that this book and series is disappointing.

    The book is stilted and plods, there is no real sense of drama or dynamism. You also never really get a sense of the scene being properly set, there are lots of place names thrown about but little or no descriptive writing that makes you feel anything about the place.

    This also extends to the characters, I couldn't feel anything really positive towards any of them, I frequently found myself thinking so what? They all seem to be petty, small minded and a little annoying or otherwise bland stereotypes.

    Getting through the book was very arduous and painful - even just listening. I have listened to the whole series and they don't get better. The book and series promised lots and delivered very little.

    Bland and uninspired.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    Loughborough, England
    7/9/12
    Overall
    "red mars"

    Promised much but never delivered this book was so slow I gave up on it as not worth the time to listen

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
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