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Oryx and Crake Audiobook
Oryx and Crake
Written by: 
Margaret Atwood
Narrated by: 
Campbell Scott
Oryx and Crake Audiobook

Oryx and Crake

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Publisher's Summary

The narrator of Atwood's riveting novel calls himself Snowman. When the story opens, he is sleeping in a tree, wearing an old bedsheet, mourning the loss of his beloved Oryx and his best friend Crake, and slowly starving to death. He searches for supplies in a wasteland where insects proliferate and pigoons and wolvogs ravage the pleeblands, where ordinary people once lived, and the Compounds that sheltered the extraordinary. As he tries to piece together what has taken place, the narrative shifts to decades earlier. How did everything fall apart so quickly? Why is he left with nothing but his haunting memories? Alone except for the green-eyed Children of Crake, who think of him as a kind of monster, he explores the answers to these questions in the double journey he takes - into his own past, and back to Crake's high-tech bubble-dome, where the Paradice Project unfolded and the world came to grief.

With breathtaking command of her shocking material, and with her customary sharp wit and dark humour, Atwood projects us into an outlandish yet wholly believable realm populated by characters who will continue to inhabit our dreams long after the last chapter. This is Margaret Atwood at the absolute peak of her powers.

©2002 O.W. Toad, Ltd.; (P)2003 Random House, Inc. Random House Audio, a division of Random House, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"Absorbing...expertly rendered...Virtuosic storytelling [is] on display." (The New York Times) "Chesterton once wrote of the 'thousand romances that lie secreted in the Origin of the Species.' Atwood has extracted one of the most hair-raising of them all, and one of the most brilliant." (Publishers Weekly)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.2 (3316 )
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  •  
    tlnpdx United States 12-17-14
    tlnpdx United States 12-17-14 Member Since 2005
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Good story poor ending."

    It was an interesting story, but ended up leaving you hanging. Even if there were a sequel I would have liked a more satisfying end to this one.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Alcide 12-15-14
    Alcide 12-15-14 Member Since 2015
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    4
    4
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    Story
    "This is my favorite Atwood title."

    I have listened to this through three times. the story is amazing and the narration is compelling. I am really transported to this weird dire world that Margaret Atwood has set this in. I say confidently that this is my favorite book of all time.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Lauren Levine Long Beach, CA 12-10-14
    Lauren Levine Long Beach, CA 12-10-14 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Very interesting dystopian concept"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    I would because it's interesting and makes us think about what we do and value in society today.


    What did you like best about this story?

    The medical aspect of things. How everything grew to be controlled by the advances made in science.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    Towards the end when we saw what happened right before the end of society as we knew it.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No.


    Any additional comments?

    The writing style of the book is not one that appeals to me. I don't like coming in as the reader with little to no context or information, as if I've just woken up on a foreign planet and have no idea what's going on. I feel a disconnect from the story and its characters when I'm given tiny bits of information at a time throughout the story only to finally know what is going on at the very end of the story. For that, I give the book 4 stars out of 5. I can appreciate the use of this style of writing, but it's not one that I personally enjoy at all.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Casey mountain view, CA, United States 11-15-14
    Casey mountain view, CA, United States 11-15-14 Member Since 2013

    caseyjones25

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    "What an bad story that goes no where"

    Half-way into the book and nothing has happened. Just a reflecting of how evil humanity can go and the awful things that we meet there.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Rick Kintigh Chicago, IL USA 10-08-14
    Rick Kintigh Chicago, IL USA 10-08-14 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "definitely a dark dystopic world"

    I think I liked this book, or maybe just wanted to like it enough that it kinda stuck. The biology, sociobiology and psychology is interesting. Marget Atwood has some interesting ideas about the psychological pressures behind the shortcomings of mankind and the traits we can graft from other species to overcome our deficiencies. She also has an absolute fixation on transactional sexuality and the myriad ways one can use/abuse sex. I mean she really digs it. We got a taste in The Handmaid's Tale, but here she super-sexualizes a seven year old (say that five times fast) and has a character that obsessively recount the abuse every few pages. Its totally unnecessary for the reader, or maybe once if that is the lever to the abused characters mind and a second time to reveal the narrator's discomfort, but after that it just feels like the author is trying to be "edgy" or confrontational and not in service to the story. Beyond the sexual disfunction most of the characters fall flat. The Crakers are actually kind of great. Their society, ritual and biology is interesting and well described. Oryx (the sexy child) is at her best in our limited observations of her with the Crakers and Crake himself is mostly a sociopathic cardboard cut-out. We are limited in our understanding of the other principal characters because our narrator is helplessly self absorbed. His interest in Oryx and Crake are simply as a reflection of his own needs, doubts and desires. Jimmy (the narrator) does offer some fun word play and all of his best moments are punctuated with his collection of under-utilized or otherwise enjoyable words.

    I have a curiosity which may prove enough to continue with the series. This is definitely a dark dystopic world, but the science is interesting and the Crakers have significant potential. Jimmy may not be beyond redemption, but it will require him embracing his role in society. He has shown signs, which is all I can ask.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Elizabeth 10-05-14
    Elizabeth 10-05-14 Member Since 2013

    Who would have thought a long commute to work could yield so much fun?

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "The first book of MaddAdam can stand on its own."
    If you could sum up Oryx and Crake in three words, what would they be?

    Psychology of change


    What other book might you compare Oryx and Crake to and why?

    The Giver... in the sense that the end seems to leave you hanging, but not so much in the same way.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

    The best and worst aspects of humanity might not be what you think they are.


    Any additional comments?

    Atwood, as usual, leaves nothing left unsaid. Growth, change, and survival are the primary themes but in the context of humanity's own self-destructive tendencies. Atwood captures possibly the most revealing aspect to being human - how tragedies endured lead to well-intended sacrifice, wisdom lost, strength, and a new myth. Atwood imbues in her three characters a very recognizable three-part person, in which the title character ends up dealing with the difference between reality, the past, and the memory that ultimately overlaps allowing for a means to joy, agony, curiosity, perplexity, and survival, although not in an anticipated way. Of course. The more closely one listens, the more one sees the conclusion unfold in each chapter, a story pre-destined and yet pregnant with 'what if' or 'what might have been', but inexorably leading to the unconditional surrender to 'what is'.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    augustine 09-17-14
    augustine 09-17-14
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Clever Manipulation of Science"

    This book is science fiction, with fiction emphasized. Margret Atwood gets the science of genetics all wrong, but that is part of the fun. It is a parable of sorts, loaded with winks and smiles.

    Unfortunately, one does not feel anything for the characters, nor does one care.

    I was disappointed because I was expecting another Handmaidens Tale. Atwood is a formidable social critic but Oryx and Crake was simply cagey.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Savage Doc Dallas, TX 09-08-14
    Savage Doc Dallas, TX 09-08-14 Member Since 2012

    Savage Doc

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Couldn't get into it"
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    I don't know who might enjoy it. It meandered around with an overly long exposition, and after 3 chapters, I simply couldn't wait any longer for something to happen.


    What do you think your next listen will be?

    A John Scalzi book. Funny, thought-provoking - I always enjoy him.


    What didn’t you like about Campbell Scott’s performance?

    It was OK, but nothing in particular that I would complain about.


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    Might have been going to somewhere interesting. It just took too long.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Wiegand Pinckney, MI, United States 08-17-14
    Wiegand Pinckney, MI, United States 08-17-14 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Depressing and boring"

    This books starts out bad, with a dystopian future, bad family life, and gets worse as the book continues. There are no likeable characters, the plot line is a bit of a stretch in places as the author struggles to get the main characters together. The overall story is almost non-existent, as it can be summed up in a couple of sentences. The narrator delivers the entire story in a monotone, coming off whiny and immature. I made it through the book because I really thought it would eventually get better, but it never did. The ending is also disappointing, as it leaves you hanging with the introduction of new critical characters but no resolution. Surely this is not a setup for a sequel, as I can't believe the author would come up with another book full of the same boring monologue.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    C. Farrell California, USA 08-11-14
    C. Farrell California, USA 08-11-14 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "The Best of the Trilogy"
    What made the experience of listening to Oryx and Crake the most enjoyable?

    Campbell Scott's narration is outstanding, and really made me love the character of Snowman. In fact, I had started reading this book years ago and just couldn't get into it. But the Audible version was great.


    Which character – as performed by Campbell Scott – was your favorite?

    Jimmy (Snowman) of course, as the book is told from his point of view and focusses on him. But even narrating the female voices, Scott does a fine job.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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