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Borders of Infinity: Miles Vorkosigan Series | [Lois McMaster Bujold]

Borders of Infinity: Miles Vorkosigan Series

The popular adventures of Miles Vorkosigan, a clever and outlandish science fiction hero for the modern era, continue in these three tales. In The Mountains of Mourning, Miles is dispatched to a back-country region of Barrayar, where he must act as detective, judge, and executioner in a controversial murder case. In Labyrinth, Miles adopts his alternate persona as Dendarii Mercenary Admiral Naismith for an undercover mission to rescue an important research geneticist from Jackson’s Whole.
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Publisher's Summary

The popular adventures of Miles Vorkosigan, a clever and outlandish science fiction hero for the modern era, continue in these three tales. In The Mountains of Mourning, Miles is dispatched to a back-country region of Barrayar, where he must act as detective, judge, and executioner in a controversial murder case.

In Labyrinth, Miles adopts his alternate persona as Dendarii Mercenary Admiral Naismith for an undercover mission to rescue an important research geneticist from Jackson’s Whole. And in the title story, Miles infiltrates an escape-proof Cetagandan POW camp and plays hero to the most deeply distressed damsel of his colorful career.

Lois McMaster Bujold burst upon the science fiction world in 1986 with Shards of Honor, the first of the Vorkosigan Saga novels. She has won the Hugo Award four times and the Nebula Award twice. The mother of two, she lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Hi-fi sci-fi: listen to more in the Vorkosigan saga.

©1989 2007 by Lois McMaster Bujold (P)2010 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What the Critics Say

“Essential for all sf collections.” (Library Journal)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

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  •  
    Melvin Ridgeland, MS, United States 07-10-10
    Melvin Ridgeland, MS, United States 07-10-10 Member Since 2007

    My name is Melvin, I grew up with NLS talking books, so naturally I just love Audible!! My favorite narrator is Grover Gardner!

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    "Borders of Infinity"

    Borders of Infinity is a great stand alone novel for the adventures of Miles Vorkosigan during his early IMSEC missions. As usual, Lois McMaster Bujold is at her best in the world of Barrayar. After enjoying these Heinleinesque adventures of the hyperactive muteeLord Miles, I strongly
    recomend them as soon to be Science Fiction Classics, much in the tradition of Robert A. Heinlein and Hal Clement!

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Clare Vancouver, BC, Canada 08-29-12
    Clare Vancouver, BC, Canada 08-29-12 Member Since 2014

    Historical & SciFi Book Lover, especially Georgette Heyer, Lois McMaster Bujold, Connie Willis (& New Who). Also books for the kids.

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    "Outstanding Stories - Shows Miles' Motivations"

    Borders of Infinity is has 3 stories: "The Mountains of Mourning" (winner of a Hugo Award), "Labyrinth", and "The Borders of Infinity". They are strong, well written stories, A must for any fan of the Vorkosigan Series.

    Firstly - the connective king narrative is the "weak link" in this book, and I almost wish the author had just produced these as the stories/novellas they are.

    Strongly recommended.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Benjamin Yarbro 07-01-15 Member Since 2009
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    "a unique approach but very interesting."

    Aunique approach for Lois but very interesting. It catches us up on a few back stories that we only knew pieces of.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Leanna Seattle, WA United States 06-20-15
    Leanna Seattle, WA United States 06-20-15 Member Since 2008

    I love to read, but I am time-limited. Audible allows me to keep up with all my favorite authors while on the hiking trail. Thanks, Audible!

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    "Chronological Order?"
    Any additional comments?

    Fun collection of short stories. Audible.com recommends this book after Brothers in Arms for their version of the chronological order of these books. At the end of Captain Vorpatril's Alliance, Lois McMaster Bujold lists her version of the chronological order of these books. She puts Borders of Infinity before Brothers in Arms. Either way, just note that some of the stories in Borders of Infinity take place before Miles goes to Earth and some take place after Miles goes to Earth.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Katherine St. Johns, FL, United States 02-26-14
    Katherine St. Johns, FL, United States 02-26-14 Member Since 2014

    I'm the managing editor of the Fantasy Literature blog. Life's too short to read bad books!

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    "Three important stories about Miles"

    Originally posted at Fantasy Literature.

    The Borders of Infinity has a different structure than the earlier VORKOSIGAN books. It’s actually three previously published novellas with a frame story. Simon Illyan, head of Imperial Security, is visiting Miles while he’s recuperating in the hospital after a surgery for bone replacements. Knowing that the government will start asking questions, Simon needs Miles to justify three large vague items in his expense reports. When Miles protests, Simon explains that because he’s the prime minister’s son, Miles must avoid even the appearance of shady accounting practices. And so Miles explains each item and thus we get the stories in the novellas “The Mountains of Morning,” originally published in Analog in May 1989, “Labyrinth,” (Analog, August 1989) and “The Borders of Infinity” (Free Lancers anthology, 1987).

    In “The Mountains of Morning” young Miles is home on the planet Barrayar after graduating from the Imperial Academy and he’s waiting for his first military assignment. One day he is sent by his father to the backwoods to investigate and deliver justice for the murder of a deformed infant. Since Miles was also born with a deformity, Aral Vorkosigan thinks his son will be the perfect envoy — clearly he intends to teach those backward folks that a twisted body doesn’t mean that a person’s brain doesn’t work. This has been a recurrent theme throughout the VORKOSIGAN SAGA.

    This story is a departure from the usual tone of the series. It lacks the humor and frantic pace of the novels, but it represents an important learning experience for Miles. He has to deal with some difficult people in a tragic situation and it’s sure to affect his future behavior. “The Mountains of Morning” won the Nebula and Hugo awards for Best Novella in 1989. In the internal chronology of the entire series, these events occur after the novel Warrior’s Apprentice and before The Vor Game. You can also find this novella as a stand-alone or in the Baen omnibus edition called Young Miles.

    If you want to follow the chronology, the next two stories should be read after Cetaganda and before Brothers in Arms.

    “Labyrinth” tells how Miles (in his guise as Admiral Naismith) and his Dendrarii mercenary fleet go to the planet Jackson’s Whole to grab a geneticist who wants out of his contract with his evil boss so he can work for Barrayar. Jackson’s Whole has got to be the most degraded place in the entire universe. This is where mad scientists set up shop to create bizarre creatures to fulfill all their customers’ sensual desires. They also create clone bodies for rich people who want to transplant their brains into these bodies when they get old (the clones’ brains are thrown away). This is where Miles’s meets future enemies such as Baron Ryoval, Baron Fell, and Baron Bharaputra. This is also where Miles meets the eight foot tall weregirl (if that’s what she is) named Taura. You’ll definitely want to read this funny story before Taura shows up again in Mirror Dance which is my favorite VORKOSIGAN novel. You can also find “Labyrinth” as a stand-alone or in the Baen omnibus edition called Miles, Mutants and Microbes.

    In “Borders of Infinity” Miles infiltrates a Cetagandan POW camp, ostensibly to find and rescue a Barrayan officer who is one of his relatives. He’s disgusted by what he finds there. The Cetagandandans are obeying the letter, but certainly not the spirit, of the universal laws for how prisoners are to be treated. Though he’s the smallest and weakest person among the thousands of prisoners, and though there’s plenty of strong opposition, Miles sets out to better their circumstances. This is an exciting story with lots of laughs and lots of loss. It’s an important part of the VORKOSIGAN series because it explains why the planet Cetaganda wants revenge on Admiral Naismith — an issue later in the series. It also explains some of Miles’ behavior in the novel Komarr. “Borders of Infinity” can also be found as a stand-alone novella and in the Baen omnibus edition called Miles Errant.

    Like the other VORKOSIGAN books, The Borders of Infinity is available in audio format. Grover Gardner is doing such a great job with the narration.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kindle Customer 03-26-13 Member Since 2014
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    "Worthwhile for the insights into Miles's character"

    The three novellas comprising this book are all thought-provoking and disturbing in different ways. All three give wonderful insights into the demons that drive Miles, in a way that maybe isn't as obvious in the novels.

    In "The Mountains of Mourning" we are taken into the Barryaran backwoods to see up close the culture of mutie-phobia that Miles grew up in and that formed the basis of his very difficult relationship with his grandfather.

    In "Labyrinth", we are exposed to a very personal encounter with the products of Jackson's Whole's amoral genetic engineering labs and learn the background of Taura.

    "Borders of Infinity" may be the most powerful of the stories, but is also the one I am least likely to re-read,precisely because it is so searing. In it, Miles wakes to find himself in Hell, no wait, a domed Cetagandan prison camp that might as well be. The story of how he gets out of there is so stained with bitter regret that I expect the experience will forever haunt him, as well as the reader.

    I know the framing story was just tossed in as an excuse to publish these three novellas together, but it was fine and not at all intrusive. The insights into Miles's character that are gained by reading all three novellas at once completely justify the repackaging of them in this format.

    Final note--I am beginning to really appreciate Grover Gardner as a narrator for this series. He doesn't go to great lengths to "do" the different characters as some narrators do, yet it is always clear who is speaking and he does enough with accents to subtly create different characters. It's a somewhat different style of narration than I'm used to, but it has grown on me, primarily because most of these books are largely from Miles's perspective and Gardner does a great Miles, perfectly capturing his rather sardonic wit.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Aryn 01-25-11
    Aryn 01-25-11
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    "Another score by LMB"

    This book harkens back to The Warrior's Apprentice in action and looking into Miles' head. It is a bit more overtly philosophical, perhaps, than the earlier stuff following TWA, but it contains the heart and humor I associate with this series. That being said, the last several books have ended on a 'down' note, and I'm not quite sure what to do with that; hence the four stars rather than five. Grover Gardner is his usual stunning self doing the narration.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Nathan 07-09-10
    Nathan 07-09-10
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    "not as good"

    This book is not as compelling as others by Lois McMaster Bujold. It is the forth in the series (fifth if you count the prequel "Falling Free" that takes place in the same universe hundreds of years earlier), and the second one that centers around the character of Miles Vorkosigan. But it is really just a collection of three short stories about this character, with a few scenes to tie them together. It was interesting only if you care about the Vokosigan character from the last book: "The Warrior's Apprentice." I highly recommend the first two books in the series though: "Shards of Honor" and "Barrayar."

    4 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Adina Andreu Concord, NC United States 06-04-11
    Adina Andreu Concord, NC United States 06-04-11 Member Since 2004
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    "So disappointed"

    I am a die-hard Vorkosigan fan. I downloaded this book months ago and waited until the right time to listen to it in order to savor it as I have the others in the series. I was so sad to find that Lois was obviously uninspired when she wrote this one. It was reminiscent of Winterfair Gifts. In that book Miles was mostly absent. I felt that his spirit was gone here as well. He was described rather than experienced. The last part was thrown in inexplicably. I just don't understand how such an important piece could be handled in minutes. It made no sense. Given my harsh critique I still adore the series and consider it one of the classic character creations.

    0 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mark Toronto, Ontario, Canada 01-23-11
    Mark Toronto, Ontario, Canada 01-23-11 Member Since 2015
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    "Good book, bad reader"

    The Miles Vorkosigan books are good. This reader is painful to listen to, though. Don't recommend it.

    0 of 3 people found this review helpful

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