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Black Sun Rising: Coldfire Trilogy, Book 1 | [C. S. Friedman]

Black Sun Rising: Coldfire Trilogy, Book 1

The Coldfire trilogy tells a story of discovery and battle against evil on a planet where a force of nature exists that is capable of reshaping the world in response to psychic stimulus. This terrifying force, much like magic, has the power to prey upon the human mind, drawing forth a person's worst nightmare images or most treasured dreams and indiscriminately giving them life. This is the story of two men. They are absolute enemies who must unite to conquer an evil greater than anything their world has ever known.
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Publisher's Summary

The Coldfire trilogy tells a story of discovery and battle against evil on a planet where a force of nature exists that is capable of reshaping the world in response to psychic stimulus. This terrifying force, much like magic, has the power to prey upon the human mind, drawing forth a person's worst nightmare images or most treasured dreams, and indiscriminately giving them life.

This is the story of two men: one, a warrior priest ready to sacrifice anything and everything for the cause of humanity's progress; the other, a sorcerer who has survived for countless centuries by a total submission to evil. They are absolute enemies who must unite to conquer an evil greater than anything their world has ever known.

©1991 C.S. Friedman (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

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  •  
    William 01-08-13
    William 01-08-13
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Tedium Ad Nauseum"

    Prelude: A lot of people seem to enjoy this book, so you might as well.

    I almost always finish the audiobooks I purchase, and I finished this one. But it was a chore, not a pleasure. The book failed for me on so many levels, but many devolve to a set of unlikable, boring characters with inexplicable motivations.

    Why does Damien, a warrior priest, instigate the quest to recover Ciani's stolen memories and adept skills? The author tells us it is because Damien is in love with Ciani, but it isn't believable. He hardly knows her at the start of the journey, and once the journey begins, he mostly avoids speaking with her. Sure, he obsesses over her in countless internal monologues, but it's an illustration of puppy love, not the type of love that would motivate a long journey by a mature man to confront a dangerous foe.

    Why does Damien hate Tarrant, the powerful dark adept that joins them on the journey? It could be because Tarrant lacks basic human values, but the author roots the conflict in Damien's religious beliefs. This is emphasized in countless internal monologues, and through some of their interactions. The problem is that the tenets of the religion are never presented. So the conflict, which represents a major plot thread, has no understandable basis. In fact, Tarrant is by far the more interesting and likable of the two characters, which makes Damien's hatred seem churlish.

    Did I mention the countless internal monologues, which go nowhere and reveal little? Half way through the book, my greatest wish was to see Damien die a horrible, horrible death. By the end, I was just happy to be finished with him and the rest.

    There are things to like about the book, such as an interesting and novel world. Unfortunately, I found it to be populated by tedious characters, a poorly explained magic system, and contradictions that made my jaw drop.

    37 of 43 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cyndane 05-27-12
    Cyndane 05-27-12 Member Since 2009
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    "A Different Take"

    The story took me by surprise in that I was not expecting a 'new' spin on such a controversial subject: Religion. You have a group of colonists effectively stranded at the outer edge of the universe on a planet that literally takes their hopes and fears and make them real. The struggle to control the human psyche and the 'monsters' that can be created from it comes down to creating and sustaining a belief system so that they can survive and thrive. However, just like in our own society, there are those that buy into the belief system and those that oppose it. The introduction of an unknown but increasingly powerful villain that requires an equally powerful but somewhat equally distasteful "hero" just makes the story that much more interesting. Imagine the creator of your most cherished and beloved philosophy turning into the very thing you're fighting against. A "creature" that embodies the things you hate and despise the most but, at the same time needing that self same individual to help you save the human race.

    The first book took a little long to get around to the actual story and character development seemed somewhat slow; but, as I listened I became more interested in the underlying story. The narrator, R.C Bray did an excellent job, and I look forward to listening to other books he has done.

    22 of 26 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Yvette Kirkland, WA, United States 02-23-13
    Yvette Kirkland, WA, United States 02-23-13
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    "Nice narration, interesting premise, but bad story"

    The reviewer "William" said it better than I could--this story became a chore to listen to. The story started off interesting and with a cool premise, but by the middle of the story it was becoming clear that the plot was going to progress at a very slow pace, that the characters weren't going to find sufficiently believable motivations, and that the stakes weren't going to be raised any time soon. I consistently found myself asking why this quest was still happening.

    The main character makes decisions that are bewildering, sacrificing his core values--and really, the core values of anyone even trying to be moral, that is, "killing lots of innocent people is bad" for a cause he has all but emotionally abandoned by that point.

    The stakes are assumed to be high, and "people will suffer if we don't finish this" is used as a justification for helping an evil person who must kill countless innocents to survive. The trouble is that despite the book's description, the story never really gives us any evidence that this is true. The main character wrestles with the moral problems of whether or not he can justify working with evil to fight some vague evil, but never stops to wonder what it is he's actually doing or why.

    It just got frustrating.

    16 of 20 people found this review helpful
  •  
    GeekTragedy Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 05-24-12
    GeekTragedy Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 05-24-12 Member Since 2011
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    "Wonderful book raised up even higher by R.C. Bray."

    R.C. Bray adds energy and fresh enjoyment to one of my favorite novels by giving a unique voice to each character, and breathing life into the book as a whole. By adopting firm yet subtle accents and inflections he helps give the sense that the regions the characters travel through, as well as the people they meet within, each have their own history and background, even when that was never hinted at in the narration itself. It's nice to hear a fantasy novel where not everyone sounds like they're all from the same country.

    As well, one of my favorite aspects of Black Sun Rising (and The Coldfire Trilogy as a whole) is its treatment of "magic" within the book. Friedman has spun a rather unique yet understandable take to it, which allows the reader to quickly learn how it works within this world, as well as what its defining laws are. Something I find rare in most fantasy novels, which too often tend to do little more then just say "What? It's magic! It just works!"

    Lastly I enjoy that the each of the characters, while most do fall into some kind of fantasy novel archetype, are all fleshed out, distinct, and well written individuals. They all have flaws as well as strengths just like the rest of us, and even though they live in a world far different from our own, it's very easy to understand both them and their motivations, even if you may not necessarily like or agree with all of them. Most importantly I find that they all consistently stay true to themselves, even when forced to compromise, and are never allowed to suddenly break character just to more easily or expediently further some aspect of the plot.

    Overall I highly recommend this audiobook and will be listening to the rest of the Coldfire Trilogy as soon as possible!

    14 of 19 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Adnan Chula Vista, CA, United States 06-23-12
    Adnan Chula Vista, CA, United States 06-23-12 Member Since 2009
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    "A Dark Epic Fantasy"

    This book is dark, and it is serious. Book has very interesting settings as well as characters. I always wanted to read a book with a vampire type creature in epic fantasy, and this book does a justice to that specific type of fiction. Vampire discussed in this book, is intelligent, powerful and mysterious. This Vampire has done what an intelligent being with such power would do. As evil as this vampire is described to be, it is still not the main bad guy of the book.

    This book is also about conflict, intrigue and pragmatism. A priest that is in conflict within his own church with a lot of intrigue; a conflicted but necessary relationship between a priest and a vampire both of whom cant stand each other, but had to work together to achieve a goal.

    This book has a lot of substance, and it brought to light with a very good narrator. Narration is correctly done that it is not overly dramatic, nor it is too passive for the story.

    I already am on the second book, and I would recommend this book for folks who are interested in reading a fantasy book with interesting settings and with dark background throughout the book.

    10 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Katherine St. Johns, FL, United States 03-20-15
    Katherine St. Johns, FL, United States 03-20-15 Member Since 2014

    I'm the managing editor of the Fantasy Literature blog. Life's too short to read bad books!

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Unique science fantasy"

    Originally posted at Fantasy Literature.

    Black Sun Rising is the first novel in C.S. Friedman’s popular COLDFIRE trilogy. I read Dominion, the prequel novella, a couple of years ago after reading (and loving) several of her science fiction novels. I admire Friedman’s worldbuilding and her writing style.

    The COLDFIRE trilogy feels like traditional epic fantasy, but it would best be categorized as science fantasy because it takes place in the far future on Erna, a planet colonized by humans looking for a habitable world. When they got to this world, they discovered that natural laws work differently. Some force, which they call the “Fae,” feeds on human fears and uses those “vibes” (my word) to influence evolution. This means, for example, that creatures that aren’t real, but that we fear, such as vampires and other monsters, can quickly evolve on Erna. (This is similar to the magic system in Robert Holdstock’s Mythago Wood and Lavondyss.) Also, the Fae interfere with human technology so that it’s nearly impossible for humans to control electricity, firearms, or other technological devices.

    Some humans, called “adepts,” have learned to “work the Fae.” This works even better if they make some sort of personal sacrifice. Shortly after the humans arrived and began getting killed off by the monsters they dreamed into existence, one of them, on his own, decided to make a sacrifice for the colony by destroying their spaceship and its vast store of knowledge. Thus, the humans have essentially cast themselves back to a medieval culture, which is what makes these novels feel more like fantasy than science fiction. I found Friedman’s explanation for why human beings were living in a medieval society on a new planet to be completely believable.

    In Dominion, we met Gerald Tarrant, an undead sorcerer who used to be the most devout and revered prophet of the One True God (essentially the Christian God) on Erna until, seeking power, he made a personal sacrifice that was so evil that it damned him to Hell. Now he is the most powerful human on Erna, but he fears death because he knows he’s damned. In order to stay alive, he had to become a vampire and must feed on human fear and blood. Thus, the man who used to be the holiest and most revered human on the planet has become the most evil and feared monster. This trade-off — the sacrifice Gerald makes in order to gain power and knowledge — is the theme of the trilogy and it produces some fascinating repercussions, ethical dilemmas, and thought exercises.

    Not all of that information is laid out in Dominion, but we get enough of it to make us want to read on to find out what motivates Gerald Tarrant. In Black Sun Rising, he is called “The Hunter” and it is known that his minions scour the streets at night looking for pretty girls to bring to their master. We also meet Reverend Damian Vryce, a devout warrior priest of the One True God who wants to rescue his girlfriend, an adept who has been kidnapped by dark forces. Thinking that Gerald is the kidnapper, he enters Gerald’s forest (which we learned about in Dominion) and finds his castle. It turns out that Gerald isn’t the bad guy (this time) and the two join forces, along with a couple of others, and begin a quest to hunt down the real bad guy (or girl).

    As you’d expect, Damien is not too happy about working with Gerald — he hates the man — but Gerald is the only person powerful enough to help him. Much of the tension in the story involves Damien’s conflicted feelings about working with and not against Gerald. Other tension stems from the hardships they endure on their quest. These involve several typical epic fantasy quest issues such as being attacked by minions of an evil sorcerer, enduring earthquakes, hiking across precarious cliffs, and tunneling through underground mines. Some of their adventures reminded me a little too much of THE LORD OF THE RINGS. There’s even a Boromir-type character and I kept thinking of the “Eye of Sauron” as they entered X--Mordor--X enemy territory. Yet despite these types of Tolkienesque plot elements, Friedman’s characters and the history of her world are completely unique and what I liked best about Black Sun Rising. I look forward to learning more and exploring more of Friedman’s world in book two, When True Night Falls.

    I’m listening to the audio versions of the COLDFIRE trilogy. They’re produced by Audible Studios and are very nicely narrated by R.C. Bray. Black Sun Rising is 24 hours long.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Stephanie Kellum 10-27-14 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "GIVE IT A CHANCE!"
    What did you love best about Black Sun Rising?

    Everything! The story line was great, the characters were well developed and the narrator was amazing.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    One of my favorite scenes was when the first venture into the Hunter’s woods occurred. I will leave it at that to not give out an spoilers for those who really want to read the book.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    I particularly loved how all of the characters had to join forces to overcome an evil despite the fact that they really would have rather killed each other! The control and determination that was portrayed by each of them kept the story going and it really made you want each of them to triumph despite all the wrong some of them had done.


    Any additional comments?

    I am writing this after reading the first two book and I must say that I absolutely love this set so far. I started this set after finishing a more historical fiction trilogy and must say it took a little bit to accumulate to the different nature of the books, but man once I did I was hooked. I was honestly very surprised by all of the negative review. The book opened with a scene that grabbed you and made you hate the character and then it kept going and this character developed into so much more and then you cannot decide of you really hate him or not. Then once you move into the second book the line gets closer and closer together and you hate to love this character, but you just cannot help it.

    I am a very vivid reader and I love making a book come to life and R.C. Bray was AMAZING and helped me do just that! I am so glad that I listened to this as opposed to actually reading because I really think that he made the book have that “it” factor that kept me hooked.

    I loved the buildup of relationships between the characters over the entire series. If you have not read on you really should. The twist and turns and the moral calling between right and wrong is just so intriguing. I listened to the books every they were just one of those books that you don’t want to put it down, or in this case, take the headphones off. I am so glad that I read them and am excited to finish the third!

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Roscoetwo usa 05-23-13
    Roscoetwo usa 05-23-13
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    "A favorite story."
    If you could sum up Black Sun Rising in three words, what would they be?

    Fantastic, imaginative, and fun!


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    The Hunter. He is a true Lawful Evil character and C.S. writes him beautifully.


    Which character – as performed by R. C. Bray – was your favorite?

    So far I'm liking Damien. R.C. Bray is excellent in his art. All the characters are well read.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I rewound a great deal. The story is so complex and compelling just one word mis-interpreted by the listener (me) can actually change a whole scenario. I laughed out loud a few times.What a great world Friedman has created. I want to find people to role play it some day. It would be a D&D world were everyone was a wild mage to one degree or another. That would be my initial interpretation. D&D 2nd Edition rules.


    Any additional comments?

    I read every Friedman book I could ten years ago. I was so happy to find her books on Audible. Life is so busy anymore and not having the time to read, being able to hear the story, remember, and imagine is a great feeling. C.S. Friedman is a favorite and in the upper pantheon of writers in this genre. When Brooks, Martin, Goodkind, and Salvatore play poker Friedman is at the table too.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mark GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN, United States 04-20-13
    Mark GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN, United States 04-20-13 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Long Stretches of Nothing"
    Would you try another book from C. S. Friedman and/or R. C. Bray?

    No


    Has Black Sun Rising turned you off from other books in this genre?

    No


    Would you be willing to try another one of R. C. Bray’s performances?

    Yes


    Could you see Black Sun Rising being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

    No


    Any additional comments?

    This book was interesting at the beginning, with an usual magic system. Then it devolved into endless wandering, with little to nothing happening. C.S. Friedman has a tendency to use the same word over and over again. Malevolence was used so often, that I wanted to throw a thesaurus at her. Not recommended, and I willl not be reading the rest of the series.

    6 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jason United States 06-20-12
    Jason United States 06-20-12 Member Since 2008
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    "Slow start but really quite fun"

    The opening of this book was hard to get through as the setting at first seems alien enough to be difficult to grasp and familiar enough to be generic (it's a post sci-fi fantasy). We immediately meet a character who is committing a heinous act and, with no appreciation for who he is, it's jarring and unpleasant to read. Eventually, the book comes into its own, with the introduction of some very enjoyable characters (although they seem a little flat at first).

    The magic system presented is more detailed than much fantasy but doesn't quite achieve a level of detail where the reader can appreciate the limitations/strengths of the magic characters without being told directly about them by the narration. It doesn't have as much detail as the Mistborn series, but that also means that it doesn't get bogged down by that detail the way that I feel that Mistborn was.

    By the epilogue, I realized that I had actually grown attached to the characters, as I was smiling and chuckling at their actions.

    4 of 6 people found this review helpful
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