To the Best of Our Knowledge: Stories of You Audiobook | Jim Fleming | Audible.com
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To the Best of Our Knowledge: Stories of You | [Jim Fleming]

To the Best of Our Knowledge: Stories of You

Who are you? A man? A woman? Are you a success? A parent? An athlete? A wallflower? A Christian? A baker? If we are only a collection of stories about ourselves... what's the truth of who "we" are?
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Publisher's Summary

In this hour, so if our identities are just stories... what does that mean for our lives, our memories, our mental health? Jonathan Adler is a psychologist who studies narrative identity. He tells Jim Fleming that his research found that our sense of well-being is based on the tone of our internal narratives rather than the stories themselves.

Then, Sara Nics explains the impetus behind this show... a lifetime of attempting to make peace with the stories we tell ourselves.

Next, press your thumb to the bridge of your nose. Now draw it slowly over the crown of your head to about where you might have a ponytail. That area under your skull is where "you" are. Research suggests that region houses the web of neurons that holding our narrative identities.

After that, Antoinetter Varner - also known as Gangaji - says she spent decades wrestling with and reshaping her narrative identity. But when she met her true spiritual teacher - a Hindu man vaguely alligned with the nondualist tradition - he told her to stop all stories. Gangaji says that's when she was finally able to connect with the "I" that underlies our selves. Steve Paulson asked Gangaji about her story, and the end of stories.

Finally, Jonathan Harris is the creator behind We Feel Fine, I Want You to Want Me, and other projects using new media to reflect human experience. In his latest work, he’s bringing together a community of storytellers in the hopes that combining individual stories might reveal the ecstatic truth of human life. Harris talked with Anne Strainchamps about learning from our common stories, myths, and sagas. [Broadcast Date: February 8, 2013]

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