We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
To the Best of Our Knowledge: Right Turn Radio/TV Program

To the Best of Our Knowledge: Right Turn

Regular Price:$3.95
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

In this hour, when President Obama took office, the Democratic Party was riding high, and the Republican Party, some thought, was on its way out. No one paid much attention to the Tea Party. Times have changed. Keli Carender is a Seattle area blogger considered by many to be the very first Tea Party activist. She tells Steve Paulson what the first protests were like. One of the early signs of change in the political atmosphere came with "the rant heard round the world" from Rick Santelli. He called up the ghosts of the Founding Fathers in his outrage at contemporary American Government.

Next, Jill Lepore teaches American history at Harvard and writes for The New Yorker. In her new book, The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party's Revolution and the Battle Over American History, Lepore does a reality check on Tea Party claims to the founding fathers. She tells Anne Strainchamps about the moment they entered the Tea Party picture.

Then, these days it doesn't matter whether you are a conservative or a liberal, if you are looking for inspiration you look to Ronald Reagan. You don't have to like his politics, or even know much about them, to be aware that he's remembered as "the great communicator." Julian Zelizer is a presidential historian and professor of history and public affairs at Princeton. He tells Jim Fleming why Reagan's still so relevant today.

And finally, is the war of ideas between red and blue America something new? Columnist David Sirota says no, the war was won in the 1980. By the conservatives. In his book Back to Our Future Sirota says the proof is in the staying power of 80s pop culture. As an example, he tells Steve Paulson about the hit sitcom Family Ties. [Broadcast Date: May 25, 2011]

Want more To The Best of Our Knowledge?

  • Subscribe for one month or 12 months.
  • Get the latest issue.
  • Check out the complete archive.

    (P) and ©2011 Wisconsin Public Radio

  • What Members Say

    Average Customer Rating

    5.0 (2 )
    5 star
     (2)
    4 star
     (0)
    3 star
     (0)
    2 star
     (0)
    1 star
     (0)
    Overall
    5.0 (1 )
    5 star
     (1)
    4 star
     (0)
    3 star
     (0)
    2 star
     (0)
    1 star
     (0)
    Story
    5.0 (1 )
    5 star
     (1)
    4 star
     (0)
    3 star
     (0)
    2 star
     (0)
    1 star
     (0)
    Performance


    There are no reviews for this title yet.

    Report Inappropriate Content

    If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

    Cancel

    Thank you.

    Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.