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To the Best of Our Knowledge: Religion 2.0 | [Jim Fleming]

To the Best of Our Knowledge: Religion 2.0

The geography of organized religion in America is changing. Today, more and more Americans identify themselves as spiritual, rather than aligning themselves with a particular religion. They're cobbling together faith and spirituality from sources all over the world, picking and choosing the same way we put together a sub sandwich at fast food restaurant. In this hour. Religion 2.0. We'll find out what spirituality looks like in today's world, from a punk Buddhist to a sufi rapper.
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Publisher's Summary

In this hour, Clark Strand is the author of How to Believe in God, and a contributing editor at Tricycle: A Buddhist Review. He tells Jim Fleming that the United States is unusual among developed nations for its continued religiosity, even while individual Americans increasingly decline to affiliate with any particular religious group, but still consider themselves spiritual people.

Next, Brad Warner is a Japanese monster movie marketer, a blogger, a Zen Buddhist Master and plays bass in a punk band. His book is Zen Wrapped in Karma Dipped in Chocolate. Warner tells Steve Paulson how he found himself a Buddhist at the end of a truly atrocious year and how he values the sacredness in everyday life.

Then, James Carse is the author of The Religious Case Against Belief. He talks with Steve Paulson about the definition of religion and argues that one can be a religious person without believing in God. You can read Steve's interview with Carse at Salon.com.

After that, Tsultrim Allione founded Tara Mandala, a retreat in Colorado, where she teaches students based on her Buddhist training in Tibet. She is also the author of Feeding Your Demons. Allione tells Anne Strainchamps about the practice of feeding one's demons and how it relates to Western therapeutic techniques.

And finally, David Plotz is the editor of Slate Magazine.com and the author of Good Book. He tells Jim Fleming why he decided to read the entire Old Testament, and how the experience has changed his life. [Broadcast Date: July 30, 2010]

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