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Studio 360: The Flaming Lips & Theresa Andersson | [Kurt Andersen]

Studio 360: The Flaming Lips & Theresa Andersson

Kurt Andersen talks with Wayne Coyne, the mastermind of the Flaming Lips, about a near-death experience. Marina Abramovic, the self-described "grandmother of performance art," sits silently in a museum atrium for months. And DIY soulster Theresa Andersson brings a garage’s worth of gadgets to the studio for a live performance.
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Publisher's Summary

Back in the 1980s, the Flaming Lips were just an alternative rock band from Oklahoma. They toured for a decade before finally hitting it big in 1993 with their song “She Don't Use Jelly.” It was an ironic grunge anthem that landed them a cameo on Beverly Hills 90210.

Then, in the spring of 2010, visitors to New York’s Museum of Modern Art could find Marina Abramovic, the self-described “grandmother of performance art,” holding court. She sat silently, all day, every day, for three months. Patrons could take turns sitting across from her for as long as they pleased. She had worked with a trainer and a nutritionist to endure long days of sitting. “If it’s comfortable, your mind can just go away. It’s not right. You have to be very aware.”

After that, you probably have a Karim Rashid in your home, and you may not even know it. The industrial designer has 3,000 designs in production — including the Umbra “Oh Chair,” the Bobble Water Bottle, and the “Garbo” trash can — many featuring his signature rounded edges, cast in colorful plastics. “Design is about being very observant of behaviors,” Rashid explains, “the way we do things — and you can see solutions very easily.”

And finally, Swedish-born, New Orleans-based singer-songwriter Theresa Andersson became an internet sensation a few years ago after she posted a video of her song “Na Na Na” to YouTube. Standing barefoot in her kitchen, surrounded by an array of instruments, Andersson plays each one, using a loop pedal to construct a breezy, effervescent pop song with a big sound. [Broadcast Date: April 21, 2012]

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    ©2012 Public Radio International, Inc.

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