C-SPAN Q & A: Walter E. Williams Audiobook | Brian Lamb | Audible.com
We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
C-SPAN Q & A: Walter E. Williams | [Brian Lamb]

C-SPAN Q & A: Walter E. Williams

This week on Q&A, our guest is the John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics at George Mason University, syndicated columnist and author Walter Williams. Williams discusses his libertarian views and tells the story of how he came to be a substitute host for the nationally syndicated Rush Limbaugh radio show. He describes growing up in the Richard Allen Housing Project in north Philadelphia, and the segregation issues he confronted after being drafted in the Army in 1959.
Regular Price:$0.95
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

This week on Q&A, our guest is the John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics at George Mason University, syndicated columnist and author Walter Williams.

Williams discusses his libertarian views and tells the story of how he came to be a substitute host for the nationally syndicated Rush Limbaugh radio show. He describes growing up in the Richard Allen Housing Project in north Philadelphia, and the segregation issues he confronted after being drafted in the Army in 1959.

Professor Williams teaches microeconomic theory at George Mason University in Fairfax Virginia. He talks about his rigorous expectations for students, and shares information on the origins of his teaching endowment from the Olin Foundation. He points out that it is “academically dishonest” for professors such as himself to share personal political views in the classroom. He states that social security in The United States has no “constitutional authority.” He says social security is a bad deal for Americans because the rate of return is very low and it penalizes people who have less money by redistributing it to those who have more. He also talks about his position that Americans should be allowed to sell their own organs as an issue of private property rights. [Broadcast Date: March 18, 2012]

Want more Q & A?

  • Subscribe for one month or 12 months.
  • Get the latest issue.
  • Check out the complete archive.

    (P) and ©2012 C-SPAN

  • What Members Say


    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

      There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

    Report Inappropriate Content

    If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

    CANCEL

    Thank You

    Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.