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You Are Not So Smart: Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You're Deluding Yourself | [David McRaney]

You Are Not So Smart: Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You're Deluding Yourself

An entertaining illumination of the stupid beliefs that make us feel wise. You believe you are a rational, logical being who sees the world as it really is, but journalist David McRaney is here to tell you that you're as deluded as the rest of us. But that's OK - delusions keep us sane. You Are Not So Smart is a celebration of self-delusion. It's like a psychology class, with all the boring parts taken out, and with no homework. Based on the popular blog of the same name, You Are Not So Smart collects more than 46 of the lies we tell ourselves everyday.
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Publisher's Summary

An entertaining illumination of the stupid beliefs that make us feel wise.

You believe you are a rational, logical being who sees the world as it really is, but journalist David McRaney is here to tell you that you're as deluded as the rest of us. But that's OK - delusions keep us sane. You Are Not So Smart is a celebration of self-delusion. It's like a psychology class, with all the boring parts taken out, and with no homework.Based on the popular blog of the same name, You Are Not So Smart collects more than 46 of the lies we tell ourselves everyday, including:

  • Dunbar's Number - Humans evolved to live in bands of roughly 150 individuals, the brain cannot handle more than that number. If you have more than 150 Facebook friends, they are surely not all real friends.
  • Hindsight bias - When we learn something new, we reassure ourselves that we knew it all along.
  • Confirmation bias - Our brains resist new ideas, instead paying attention only to findings that reinforce our preconceived notions.
  • Brand loyalty - We reach for the same brand not because we trust its quality but because we want to reassure ourselves that we made a smart choice the last time we bought it.

©2011 David McRaney (P)2011 Gildan Media Corp

What the Critics Say

"In an Idiocracy dominated by cable TV bobbleheads, government propagandists, and corporate spinmeisters, many of us know that mass ignorance is a huge problem. Now, thanks to David McRaney's mind-blowing book, we can finally see the scientific roots of that problem. Anybody still self-aware enough to wonder why society now worships willful stupidity should read this book." (David Sirota, author of Back to Our Future: How the 1980s Explain the World We Live In Now)

What Members Say

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  •  
    Ilinca Romania 04-03-13
    Ilinca Romania 04-03-13 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "good one"

    Most of these things are, well, not to say rehashed, but somewhat of a collection of familiar stories. It's pop sociology/psychology, for sure - but I'm giving it four stars because it's well-written and organized, and, as collections go, it's fun and informative to read.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Diane United States 07-23-12
    Diane United States 07-23-12 Member Since 2012
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    "Contradictory in tone"

    This book is presented as a serious journalistic approach to an aspect of the human psyche, specifically the way in which people tend to delude themselves. Points are well explained and the author frequently cites scientific studies to back his claims. But he also uses teenage slang expressions (something "sucks", is a "bummer") and gratuitous profanity (which Audible.com will not allow me to quote) that is incongruous with the general tone of the book. At best, this is distracting for the listener. At worst, it leads me to have doubts about the author's credibility. In sum, a credit could have been better used on a different book.

    6 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    m.emery 04-23-14
    m.emery 04-23-14 Member Since 2015
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    "Complete Nonsense"
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    If you are a narcissistic, self deluded, douchebag, this might be for you. Because that is what this book claims every human being is.


    Has You Are Not So Smart turned you off from other books in this genre?

    No


    Which scene was your favorite?

    None


    Any additional comments?

    Summary... "you think you are smart and that other people idolize you. You think the world revolves around you and that all other human beings are morons. You are wrong. Only the author of this book is that smart. Not you." This book is simply that message repeated about 100 times in different words.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brandon TWIN LAKES, WI, United States 12-30-13
    Brandon TWIN LAKES, WI, United States 12-30-13 Member Since 2014
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    "Psychology Speed Dating"

    A bit like speed dating, just replace the Hunks and/or Hotties with general psych topics centered on self-delusion. The voicing is witty and casual and reads like a somewhat snarky friend who is done taking crap from his co-workers. Chapters are brief and feel more like blog entries than science writing, approaching their topics with sufficient information to communicate the colors and contours of each concept but never getting grittily into details. This makes the book great as a (VERY) quick survey of self-delusion for those who have a slight or budding interest, but less than great for those already familiar with the scientific treatment of self-delusions and who might be interested in a more in-depth treatment. Little to no effort is made to prove points, and much of the information is presented in a "well, just believe me" kind of casual style. This is perhaps frustrating in light of the fact that ALL of the phenomena covered by the book are very well-evidenced in the psychology literature and are grounded on far firmer footing than McRaney makes them seem. With this considered, perhaps YOU ARE NOT SO SMART is best evaluated as Gateway Reading, with its merit lying more in pulling psychological phenomena into public awareness than in explaining or exploring them in any sordid detail.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jami VICTOR, NY, United States 12-15-13
    Jami VICTOR, NY, United States 12-15-13 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "I Feel Smarter Than The Author Says I Am!!!!!"

    This started a little slow for me, but it picked up quickly. There were some interesting psychology principles presented in an easy to understand manner; some of them I was familiar with from undergrad and life, and some were surprising (yet made perfect sense once explained).

    I have to say that the narration was very good. I was highly amused because the author uses the word "asshole" or expressions like "you are not the shit" sporadically. It came far and few between enough so that I chuckled each time. The narrator has this very cultured, proper voice, and that is how I picture him. When he calmly reads "you are not the shit" in the same tone as the rest of the book, it really is quite funny (or I just have a strange sense of humor, which is also quite possible).

    There were some logic games that were fun to do. I also enjoyed the exposure of the logical fallacies that we all (yes, ALL of us) commit. Even your feeling of "I would never fall for that" is not as unique as you think!

    Some of the chapters I enjoyed the most involved the memory and how false memories are created. I had the image that he described of memories being retrieved like files on a disc; however, that is not true. We reconstruct memories based on experiences and the author shows how false memories are created. I also really like the chapter about egocentrism and how you feel that everyone is noticing you - the big zit on your forehead, your new haircut, new outfit, etc. In reality, that is not the case and people are too busy focusing on themselves to focus on you as much as you think. There was a bit about catharsis that I can apply to may daily commute to work. The author explains how you feel good after making a rude gesture to someone after you are cut off in traffic. However, this does not get rid of the negative emotions that the cutting off evokes; what it does do is provide a cathartic effect so it feels good to you. In turn, you seek out that feeling again. Hm, that would explain why I find the need to use "sign language" so often as I drive to and from work!

    I'm sure that most people will have different chapters that they feel are interesting or pertinent to them, but there is enough in this book that I think many people will find several interesting areas.

    I love the chapter on hypochondria and how a hypochondriac uses the excuse of not feeling well to avoid projects that feel overwhelming to them or so that they avoid failure. The author also explains how the self-fulfilling prophecy works and how you can talk yourself into things. On that note, I need to end this review now......suddenly, I'm not feeling well.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Carl West Palm Beach, FL, United States 09-17-13
    Carl West Palm Beach, FL, United States 09-17-13 Member Since 2015
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    "Boy I'm I an idiot but I sure loved the book"

    I've read books like this before but written by the scientists or researchers. David McRaney however is a journalist and therefore makes conveys the information faster, in a more entertaining manner, and in a way that is easier to absorb. In other words he doesn't go on and on detailing experiments, their shortcomings, and so on. He also often talks in the language on a common man, cuss words and all, which drive home the points and makes them easy to relate to. Great fun but sometimes a bit depressing to know how dumb I am. Of course there is the famous saying that goes... "The more I know, the more I know I don't know". Loved it

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brad Barker Cana Va 06-08-13
    Brad Barker Cana Va 06-08-13 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Now I know how smart I ain't...."

    I really enjoyed this book. Each chapter discusses some condition, brain quirk or tendency we all share, and makes us all, "Not So Smart". There's a new show on National Geographic Channel that touches on many of the same topics you can find in this book. If your interested in such things, or just want a book to point out that you aren't nearly as smart as you think you are, (and who doesn't love that), this is definitely worth the read.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Gail jackson, NJ, United States 03-18-13
    Gail jackson, NJ, United States 03-18-13 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Not What I Expected"

    Read like a list of hypotheses, that I had no interest in ... or any reason to be. I kept hoping for the "list" to stop, so that the author would provide me with a reason to find any of it layperson compelling.. I couldn't make it through this one. I'm sure,however, a textbook read like this will be of value to some. The title and packaging drew me in (brilliant marketing), but was left yawning.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    dean TEMPE, AZ, United States 03-15-13
    dean TEMPE, AZ, United States 03-15-13 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "User's Manual for Your Brain"
    What did you love best about You Are Not So Smart?

    It has such interesting insights into why we do what we do, which is often different from what is popular belief. Every idea is backed up by an experimental study which has results that are counter-intuitive, or at least interesting. Highly recommend this one!!


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    A. Alexander Texas 02-20-13
    A. Alexander Texas 02-20-13

    turlene50

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Not good"
    What would have made You Are Not So Smart better?

    A different narrator. Don Hagan almost put me to sleep with his lackluster voice. As far as the content, I found some of the information enlightening. But after about 45 minutes of listening, I couldn't go any further and will not finish the audiobook. It was a waste of my money. Sorry...


    Would you recommend You Are Not So Smart to your friends? Why or why not?

    No


    How could the performance have been better?

    Dick Hill would have been much better!


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 11-20 of 92 results PREVIOUS12310NEXT
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  • BlackApple
    Windsor, United Kingdom
    12/23/12
    Overall
    "Interesting and accessible psychology"

    This books deals with aspects of the way we make sense of things and does so without saying "cognitive psychology" too often. We all live in our own heads and so understanding how and why we simplify, distort and just generally make things up is both informative and entertaining. At the end of this book you may never see advertising quite the same way again and it may even have you doubting your own memory (hint: all memory is a construct and not very reliable)



    I really enjoyed is book and it's short chapters make for great short snippets while driving/commuting.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Wicked
    England
    12/13/12
    Overall
    "I loved this book"

    At least I think I did!

    This book makes you question everything you think and even how you think. Presented in a very entertaining way, it uses research and evidence to back up and explain every point brilliantly. The narration was wickedly dry and humourous. It will challenge and some people might find that too difficult but if you allow yourself to look at your own behaviour with the knowledge from this book, you might just laugh at what you see. Fantastic listen, highly recommended.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Alex
    MILTON KEYNES, United Kingdom
    2/2/12
    Overall
    "Disappointing read"

    The title and synopsis sounded so interesting, but the further I got through it, the more I resent having lost hours of listening to this book.

    Initially the book's premise is interesting, however the further you progress the more you realise that there's a good reason that people in general don't notice these subtle flaws in human nature -- because its easier to progress through life not beleiving you are as selfish, egocentric and predictable as everyone else.

    Sadly Don Hagen's narration is monotonous and uninspiring as the book. My main critism is that the author glosses over good nature and avoids giving recommendations to become better people - which seems like a missed opportunity in such a negative book.

    My advice: Go read a cheerful book full of escapism and good nature instead. You might be less enlightened, but you'll feel better for it.

    7 of 14 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 11-13 of 13 results PREVIOUS12NEXT

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