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Why Nations Fail Audiobook

Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty

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Publisher's Summary

Brilliant and engagingly written, Why Nations Fail answers the question that has stumped the experts for centuries: Why are some nations rich and others poor, divided by wealth and poverty, health and sickness, food and famine?

Is it culture, the weather, geography? Perhaps ignorance of what the right policies are?

Simply, no. None of these factors is either definitive or destiny. Otherwise, how to explain why Botswana has become one of the fastest growing countries in the world, while other African nations, such as Zimbabwe, the Congo, and Sierra Leone, are mired in poverty and violence?

Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson conclusively show that it is man-made political and economic institutions that underlie economic success (or lack of it). Korea, to take just one of their fascinating examples, is a remarkably homogeneous nation, yet the people of North Korea are among the poorest on earth while their brothers and sisters in South Korea are among the richest. The south forged a society that created incentives, rewarded innovation, and allowed everyone to participate in economic opportunities. The economic success thus spurred was sustained because the government became accountable and responsive to citizens and the great mass of people. Sadly, the people of the north have endured decades of famine, political repression, and very different economic institutions - with no end in sight. The differences between the Koreas is due to the politics that created these completely different institutional trajectories.

Based on 15 years of original research Acemoglu and Robinson marshall extraordinary historical evidence from the Roman Empire, the Mayan city-states, medieval Venice, the Soviet Union, Latin America, England, Europe, the United States, and Africa to build a new theory of political economy with great relevance for the big questions of today, including:

  • China has built an authoritarian growth machine. Will it continue to grow at such high speed and overwhelm the West?
  • Are America’s best days behind it? Are we moving from a virtuous circle in which efforts by elites to aggrandize power are resisted to a vicious one that enriches and empowers a small minority?
  • What is the most effective way to help move billions of people from the rut of poverty to prosperity? More philanthropy from the wealthy nations of the West? Or learning the hard-won lessons of Acemoglu and Robinson’s breakthrough ideas on the interplay between inclusive political and economic institutions?

Why Nations Fail will change the way you look at—and understand—the world.

Download the accompanying reference guide.

©2012 Daron Acemoglu (P)2012 Random House

What the Critics Say

"Why Nations Fail is a truly awesome book. Acemoglu and Robinson tackle one of the most important problems in the social sciences - a question that has bedeviled leading thinkers for centuries - and offer an answer that is brilliant in its simplicity and power. A wonderfully readable mix of history, political science, and economics, this book will change the way we think about economic development. Why Nations Fail is a must-read book." (Steven Levitt, co-author of Freakonomics)

"You will have three reasons to love this book: It’s about national income differences within the modern world, perhaps the biggest problem facing the world today. It’s peppered with fascinating stories that will make you a spellbinder at cocktail parties - such as why Botswana is prospering and Sierra Leone isn’t. And it’s a great read. Like me, you may succumb to reading it in one go, and then you may come back to it again and again." (Jared Diamond, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of the best sellers Guns, Germs, and Steel and Collapse)

"A compelling and highly readable book. And [the] conclusion is a cheering one: The authoritarian ‘extractive’ institutions like the ones that drive growth in China today are bound to run out of steam. Without the inclusive institutions that first evolved in the West, sustainable growth is impossible, because only a truly free society can foster genuine innovation and the creative destruction that is its corollary." (Niall Ferguson, author of The Ascent of Money)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.3 (1053 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Peter Swart 04-30-16
    Peter Swart 04-30-16 Member Since 2014
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    2
    2
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    Story
    "Great story telling and insights"

    Very insightful coverage of events covering the globe and many centuries. Loved how development across cultures are summarized.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 04-13-16 Member Since 2016
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    "great"

    a different view with a global historical basis, sometimes a little confusing, but it worth the time

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Csillaxej 04-13-16
    Csillaxej 04-13-16 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
    4
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    "One of my favourites"
    Would you listen to Why Nations Fail again? Why?

    Yes, and I already did. Especially the summary and conclusion chapters at the beggining of the book are great, give such a good inishgt. The rest of the book is also very interesting, but there mainly for the cases when you are interested in all the small details. Otherwise the early chapters are the best.


    What did you like best about this story?

    The book gives a very wellr rounded and detailed explanation about the ways of the world today. Easy to follow, sound reasoning.


    Have you listened to any of Dan Woren’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    Its ok, although its a "hard material" not being an actual story. He manages to keep the voice acting engaging though. Could certainly be worse :)


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tom 04-07-16
    Tom 04-07-16 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "I wish this would be read by the masses."

    I've always wondered why countries couldn't seem to get it together. They were never designed to is the answer. We have to look deeper than the title of democracy. That's not where the fight is happening.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    sphoorti 04-03-16
    sphoorti 04-03-16 Member Since 2016
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    "terrible book"
    What would have made Why Nations Fail better?

    The author seems to have a view theory in mind and applies it all over the world trying to prove the correctness of his theory. The treatment is shallow and unscientific. The booking is very boring. I gained no insights or knowledge from this audio book.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    20sbuyer 03-24-16
    20sbuyer 03-24-16
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    REVIEWS
    8
    1
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    Story
    "Great book -- but bad audiobook"

    Really interesting content but too academic for an audiobook. The repetitive terms make it hard to follow. There isn't enough narrative or characters to work in this format.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Luis Ro 03-17-16
    Luis Ro 03-17-16 Member Since 2015
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    3
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    "Beyond Entertaining Mind Opening"

    Really enjoyed this book, telling the modern history of development and the why behind the industrialization and rapid growth of Western Nations all in an entertainingly fashion, this is almost Paradigm-Shifting.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Razvan Purza 02-19-16 Member Since 2015
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    8
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    "Good book"

    Excellent points. However the book is very long and could have made all its points in 3/4 of the length.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael WS. Tuscaloosa, AL USA 02-05-16
    Michael WS. Tuscaloosa, AL USA 02-05-16 Member Since 2015
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    "great for understanding foreign pretexts"

    Just an overall great experience to peer into the somewhat objective pasts of lesser known histories.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Walter Hopkins New York 11-27-15
    Walter Hopkins New York 11-27-15 Member Since 2015
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    Story
    "An important book for economics and public policy"

    I studied economics and public policy in college, and I wish this book had been written back then. The authors show that a political and economic institutions - either inclusive or exclusive - should be the focal point in understanding why it has succeeded or failed. The evidence is compelling, and it made me change some previous held views and crystallized others. Five stars without a doubt.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
Sort by:
  • Judy Corstjens
    4/29/13
    Overall
    "History made science"

    Breathtaking sweep across time and geography, flying along on the coat-tails of a theory that is so intuitively acceptable that it almost makes you say 'duh'. A society's institutions, extractive (bad) or inclusive (good) explain the wealth of the society and the health and happiness of the common man (and, if you are really lucky, woman). I hated history at school because it didn't explain: just one damn thing after another. This does, right up to the end where they use their theory to predict the future success of current societies. It explains why 'state building' (e.g. in Afgahanistan) is such a challenge. The UK (a pioneer in modern state building) got properly started on the process in 1215, brought in universal education in about 1890 and gave women the vote in 1928. Mind expanding book.

    27 of 28 people found this review helpful
  • Patrick
    Warrington, United Kingdom
    5/5/13
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    Story
    "Brillianr explanation of the World we see today!"

    Why Nations Fail is one of the most thought provoking books I've ever listened to.

    This book explains in detail the reasons why we see the world as it is today. British, and in particular English creativity and entrepreneurism are at the heart of the story and describes how the actions of those people who wrestled power away from English elite society in the 17th century changed the face of the world for ever.

    Well worth a read if you want to know why the USA succeeded to become the most powerful country in the world and didn't end up as just another failed state.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • julien
    county wicklow, Ireland
    3/28/13
    Overall
    "unconvincing"

    the authors repeat the same argument over and over, stretching vast amounts of historical examples to fit it's frame.



    The reflexion is weak and unconvincing, thus the authors resort to an aggressive and patronizing rhetoric to dismiss other theories regarding the disparity between nations. They seem particularly threatened by Jared Diamonds Gun, Germ and Steal, and rightly so.



    Although they would have us believe that we are responsible for our own misery or prosperity because of the institutions we live by, they then admit that there is no reason for one set of institutions to appear in one place rather than another, their explanation being a parallel between their theory and evolution, small institutional differences brought forward by crisis.



    there is no proper causal description, at best a messy pile of historical examples correlated with economic development. Whatever argument worth mentioning could have been said in a few paragraphs



    the fact that the authors are so pleased with themselves render the all experience rather unbearable.

    13 of 16 people found this review helpful
  • Petros
    3/2/15
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    "Interesting only as a history book"

    Interesting only as a history book. The assumptions of the writers are in most cases based on an one sided interpretation of historical events and they are missing some very obvious points.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • M
    Wakefield, United Kingdom
    9/25/14
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    Performance
    Story
    "Repetitive, but interesting."

    As has been said - repetitively - by other reviewers, this is a very repetitive book. And not just thematically. If you removed the words "inclusive", "extractive", "institutions", "glorious revolution of 1688" and ”creative destruction" the book would be about 9 hours shorter. It's still quite interesting (especially when they zoom in on specific histories, like with Botswana, Uzbekistan and Brazil, about which I knew nothing) and I kept going to the end, but the Grand Theory being espoused doesn't seem all that remarkable, unfortunately. (It can be summarised as: If your public institutions are strong enough to stop the gangsters from getting in charge, you're probably going to be okay, if not, you're screwed.) So, not bad, but not brilliant either. (Did I mention it's repetitive?")

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • John Owen Byrne
    London
    1/28/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great companion to Diamond's work"

    This is a fantastic contrast to Jared Diamond's work on the origins of poverty. This should be required reading for anyone interested in the real sources of inequality. There is a slight danger in the book where anything that happens which is not consistent with the overall thesis becomes a 'contingency' of history. That said, the arguments are convincing and beautifully told.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • rebecca
    8/8/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A book everyone should read/listen to"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    The complexities of how politics, economics , history and sociology affect the forming and falling of every nation on earth is explained in a way that is both easy to understand and engaging.
    Anyone who ever felt frustrated about the state of the world or baffle by politics should read this book which proves when it comes to nations it's not what you have but what you do that counts.
    Truly a masterpiece


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Why Nations Fail?

    learning that having too many natural resources (the curse of oil holds back most of middle east from innovation) can be damaging to a nation state


    What about Dan Woren’s performance did you like?

    the clear explanations were not patronising but informing


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Rami
    7/5/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Well researched and incredibly informative."

    As a beginner to this topic this title answered nearly all of my questions comprehensively. a true eye opener. Definitely give this one a go.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • John
    5/10/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Highly misleading"

    Does not include the role developed countries play in undermining the development of inclusive institutions in developing countries post- independence (neo-colonialism)

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Conor
    5/10/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Excellent, well-argued theory"

    Interesting perspective on national development and global politics. Guns, Germs & Steel a good companion

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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