Who Stole Feminism? Audiobook | Christina Hoff Sommers | Audible.com
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Who Stole Feminism? | [Christina Hoff Sommers]

Who Stole Feminism?

Philosophy professor Christina Sommers has exposed a disturbing development: how a group of zealots, claiming to speak for all women, are promoting a dangerous new agenda that threatens our most cherished ideals and sets women against men in all spheres of life. In case after case, Sommers shows how these extremists have propped up their arguments with highly questionable but well-funded research, presenting inflammatory and often inaccurate information and stifling any semblance of free and open scrutiny.
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Publisher's Summary

Philosophy professor Christina Sommers has exposed a disturbing development: how a group of zealots, claiming to speak for all women, are promoting a dangerous new agenda that threatens our most cherished ideals and sets women against men in all spheres of life. In case after case, Sommers shows how these extremists have propped up their arguments with highly questionable but well-funded research, presenting inflammatory and often inaccurate information and stifling any semblance of free and open scrutiny. Trumpeted as orthodoxy, the resulting "findings" on everything from rape to domestic abuse to economic bias to the supposed crisis in girls' self-esteem perpetuate a view of women as victims of the "patriarchy".

Who Stole Feminism? is a call to arms that will enrage or inspire, but cannot be ignored.

©1994 Christina Hoff Sommers; (P)1996 Blackstone Audio Inc.

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  •  
    Kaeli Irving, TX, USA 05-03-08
    Kaeli Irving, TX, USA 05-03-08
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    "Long for an updated edition"

    When I hear women my age proudly claim they are defiantly NOT feminists, I am taken aback. Ms. Sommers does an excellent job of showing just why so many young women are running away from the feminist label. They don't want to be associated with man-haters: women who view every man as a potential rapist and every woman a potential survivor. She highlights many of the events from the late eighties and early nineties that ended up giving feminism a very bad name. Rather than trying to promote equal rights for all humanity (the so-called equity feminists), some feminists (gender feminists) are trying to supplant the patriarchy with a matriarchy. To do so, they overblow poorly done studies and try to silence maleness wherever it rears its ugly head (pun, unfortunately, intended). She does such a good job of pointing out the hysteria and rancor of this sect of feminists, I had to remind myself constantly that I agree with her thesis-those kinds of feminists are bad for feminism. They take away from the social justice that generations of women have fought for; they stray from the goals of the Seneca Falls Convention and forget that many sisters around the world really are being suppressed; they devalue the terms sexual harassment and rape by having them apply to everything. I'm grateful she kept repeating the goals of equality through her book or I would have completely forgotten I wasn't reading the transcripts of a Rush Limbaugh show (a mistake none of us ever wants to make!).

    This book was written in 1995, so I was still in junior high and high school when most of these events were unfolding. I wonder how much of her arguments are simply overblown to give evidence to her thesis, how much was relegated only to certain university campuses, and how much has mercifully blown over in the past decade. I would love to see an updated version of this book. In the meantime, I'll read books like The Mommy Myth and Selling Anxiety.

    8 of 10 people found this review helpful
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    D. Martin Rockville, MD USA 05-09-13
    D. Martin Rockville, MD USA 05-09-13 Member Since 2007
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    "Good book that you shouldn't bother reading"

    This is one of those books that someone had to write, and I'm glad to know it's out there. Sommers carefully documents all of the craziness in the feminist movement in the 1990s, and there sure was a lot of it! Claims that sexual assaults increase massively Superbowl weekend (they don't) or that the leading cause of miscarriage is domestic abuse (not even close) were bandied about wildly without regard for truth. What's more fun is the portrayal of academic conferences and the crazy one-upswomanship: when some of the attendees gathered in a drum circle, others declared that this was an appropriation of their cultural traditions and demanded they stop, which they did reluctantly. It's a delightful image of what happens when claims of marginalization become badges of honor.

    Yes, the book is very dated. This of course makes you wonder whether things have gotten better. I have no idea.

    Ultimately, this is one of those books that needed to be written but that isn't worth reading. Feel comfortable knowing that someone has done the work of collating all the craziness. And yes, Sommers has some affiliation with conservative hacks. That's unfortunate, but to my reading, this doesn't really affect the book.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
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    Travis Calgary, AB, Canada 02-26-07
    Travis Calgary, AB, Canada 02-26-07 Member Since 2005
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    "An excellent and well supported argument"

    Christina Hoff Sommers does an excellent job of presenting her point - that the modern, North American view of "feminism" is being swayed by people that are more interested in political agendas than equality between the genders. By citing specific cases where statistics have been interpreted with bias, where feminist groups promoting a "better way of interacting" have failed to successfully work together, and where the media has been more interested in sensational stories than proper fact verification, "Who Stole Feminism?" is successful at showing the reader that there may be more behind the current feminist movement than the surface suggests.

    While presenting a strong argument for the "equity feminist" view point, I feel the novel still suggests that the reader make their own decision and come to their own conclusion. Christina Hoff Sommers strongly encourages people to review claims made by any feminist group, and to verify results of studies before coming to a conclusion.

    The book makes it clear that, while there is still perhaps a great deal of work left to achieving equality between the genders, headway has already been made and the future is not as dismal as others may make it appear to be.

    As a male that supports equality, this was one of the first books I have read on the subject that has not made me feel like my gender was being stereotyped and attacked for the transgressions of people I have never met.

    7 of 10 people found this review helpful
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    Linzi Tempe, AZ, USA 11-19-08
    Linzi Tempe, AZ, USA 11-19-08
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    "...?"

    I was disappointed that I spent a credit on this book. I would urge those who steer clear from Fox news, Ann Coulter and other quasi-informative political quacks, to treat this material similarly.

    Facts are no doubt important, however, belief frequently overrides the function of truth. By this, I mean that while the fact may be A (say, perhaps that the earth is round), the working rule could be B (the average person long ago BELIEVED that the earth was flat). In the preface, when she determines that "feminists", or "gender feminists" as she later "specifies", she attributes false information as male-bashing and lack of "fact-checking".

    Though the FACTS do not support the information, and the likes of Naomi Wolff, etc., quickly admitted that they were mistaken, editors did not question their "facts". This is because their "facts" were not outrageous, ie, it is plausible for average people (from publishers to readers) to think that spousal abuse is the number one cause for birth defects or that thousands of women die every year from anorexia.

    She probably found it so difficult to find funding for her research because it was taking place a century too late.

    4 of 23 people found this review helpful
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