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The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness | [Michelle Alexander]

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

In the era of colorblindness, it is no longer socially permissible to use race, explicitly, as a justification for discrimination, exclusion, and social contempt. Yet, as legal star Michelle Alexander reveals, today it is perfectly legal to discriminate against convicted criminals in nearly all the ways that it was once legal to discriminate against African Americans.
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Publisher's Summary

In the era of colorblindness, it is no longer socially permissible to use race, explicitly, as a justification for discrimination, exclusion, and social contempt. Yet, as legal star Michelle Alexander reveals, today it is perfectly legal to discriminate against convicted criminals in nearly all the ways that it was once legal to discriminate against African Americans. Once you’re labeled a felon, the old forms of discrimination - employment discrimination, housing discrimination, denial of the right to vote, denial of educational opportunity, denial of food stamps and other public benefits, and exclusion from jury service - are suddenly legal.

©2012 Michelle Alexander (P)2012 Recorded Books, LLC

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  •  
    Rebecca San Diego, CA USA 08-08-14
    Rebecca San Diego, CA USA 08-08-14 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Important, but oh so repetitive..."

    The author has provided a well-researched book on the inequities of the American justice system, and on the broader implications of this inequality. I learned a lot, and was greatly challenged by her argument. Yet, as I listened I often found myself thinking, "Wait, didn't I just here that yesterday, and the day before that...?"

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    augustine Mc Farland, WI, United States 07-21-14
    augustine Mc Farland, WI, United States 07-21-14 Member Since 2010
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    "The Tragedy of the Justice System"

    This is a book that all Americans should read. Be prepared to come away feeling ashamed of being American. Well written and researched, Michelle Alexander minutely details the justice system in America in the aftermath of the War on Drugs. Whatever your politics, you owe it to yourself to understand the economic and social price that we are paying for incarcerating so many of our young black population.

    The narration gives the book just the right amount of pathos.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Erica Atwood Philadelphia, PA United States 05-27-14
    Erica Atwood Philadelphia, PA United States 05-27-14 Member Since 2013

    echobravo1119

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    "The Truth is Hard to Ignore"
    Would you listen to The New Jim Crow again? Why?

    Regardless of you political views or race, this is an important perspective of the history of incarceration in our country.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The New Jim Crow?

    The data.


    What three words best describe Karen Chilton’s performance?

    Yes, and SHE achieves this by walking you thru the historical context of the issue and how it is a systemic issue.


    Any additional comments?

    It is unfortunate that the audible chapters do not match up with the book chapters making it hard to utilize this version as a tool with the hard copy.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Celia Missoula, MT, United States 05-03-14
    Celia Missoula, MT, United States 05-03-14 Member Since 2007
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    "A little repetitive, but otherwise astounding"

    Important information, should make us all uneasy about the future that has been crafted for an entire segment of the population by a combination of the "war on drugs" and commercialization of corrections. My only quibble is that it is a little repetitive. The narration is perfect. Totally appropriate and easy on the ears (if not on the brain).

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tim 04-24-14
    Tim 04-24-14 Member Since 2010
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    "A bit repetitive."

    Seemed like I was listening to the same story several times. This required dedication to finish.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Paige Cordial 04-15-14 Member Since 2013
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    "Excellent, important work"
    Would you listen to The New Jim Crow again? Why?

    Definitely. It was eye opening, informative, and well-written.


    What did you like best about this story?

    This book illuminated a huge social and racial issue in the U.S. It was written in an accessible and understandable way.


    What about Karen Chilton’s performance did you like?

    Her reading is expressive and keeps the listener engaged.


    What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

    I learned a ton about the workings of the criminal justice system that I didn't know.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Richard J. Peach Boston 03-27-14
    Richard J. Peach Boston 03-27-14 Member Since 2013

    RP

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    "Everyone Needs To Read / Agree or Disagree"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    It is an eye opening book and some may not agree with everything written as did I. But there is no doubt the author's take on the War on Drugs is dead on. Makes a lot of good points and you have to be willing to be open minded.


    What did you like best about this story?

    The chapters about the war on drugs. It was spot on


    Which scene was your favorite?

    Wasnt this type of book.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No, it was a pretty deep and thought provoking book. You need time process it and think about it. So I would put it down and come back to it


    Any additional comments?

    As a white male who works in the correctional field I find it eye opening. Didn't agree with everything but there is a lot that makes sense.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Zach Cody, WY 10-03-13
    Zach Cody, WY 10-03-13 Member Since 2011
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    "Recommended with a caveat"

    Michelle Alexander has put together a very well written and well researched book regarding the horrors of the drug war. She goes into great detail about how minority populations (primarily blacks) have been devastated by the unsuccessful war on drugs. She makes a few mentions of how poor whites have recently become affected by the same war on drugs ala "The House I Live In". However, her conclusions regarding the escalation of the war on drugs seem to be biased. She continuously blames "conservatives" for the war on drugs. They bear some blame, no doubt. But to be more accurate, it seems that Republicans (sometimes conservative) would be a better way to describe those who have caused the escalation. Furthermore, she places little blame on Democrats and usually makes excuses for those who contributed.

    In the end, it's clear Ms. Alexander sees the world through a right vs left paradigm. But the truth is that when assessing responsibility for the drug war, a populist vs authoritarian, or libertarian vs statist view would be much better in assessing political blame. After all, a true conservative should believe that a small government is best. The drug war is a result of the exponential increase in the size of government. But again, I will continue to recommend this book to friends with that caveat.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    3rdEye United States 09-05-13
    3rdEye United States 09-05-13 Member Since 2008
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    "A Monumental, Scholarly, Desparately Needed Work!"
    What did you love best about The New Jim Crow?

    What I most deeply appreciate about this work is its depth and fullness, it sincere caring, unapologetic straightforward courage, its clarity, and its point-on focus about one of the greatest, most troubling, and far too often evaded issues this nation faces.

    Michelle Alexander is absolutely brilliant, bold, and a true giant in the struggle for human decency and justice. The New Jim Crow shows how contemporary methods have undergone a careful refinement in order to perpetuate the worn-out racial caste system in America.

    Comparing the "New Jim Crow" to previous forms of control, Michelle shows how precisely this new systems is tailored to match the subtleties of current conditions, conditions not so apt to exhibit or support more overt forms of bigotry. She shows how stereotypical images in the media about people of color in general, and young black men in particular feed an established belief system in the back of the American mind that continues to want to hold that there are some humans that are better, more valuable than others, that people of color are more prone to criminal behaviors than whites, although the facts suggest that crime is committed at surprisingly similar rates among all people.

    What this book clearly shows is that 1. It is much more easier for people of color to get snatched up in the criminal "justice" system than ever before. 2. Once caught, one is stuck in the system for a much longer periods of time than ever before. 3. And once one has paid their debt in this way, one can;t seem to get beyond stigma of the experience of having been incarcerated (loss of rights, inability to get employment, housing, government benefits, etc.).

    Michelle acknowledges and does not excuse the deep pain and overwhelming destruction caused by crime, but she carefully shows how the current system is really not so much about eliminating crime as it is eliminating and disempowering the presence of free people of color in this society.

    This book is well researched, clean and crisp, presenting an abundance of facts upon which it base its arguments. I would recommend it to anyone who has a heart to care and a mind to know the truth, and the conviction that humanity can set a far better example of what it means to be civilized.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    N/A


    What does Karen Chilton bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Karen Chilton does an excellent job narrating this work. She helps keep the focus on the work itself, and her reading is flawless.


    What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

    The enormous amount of knowledge and clarity about this deeply important subject. I plan to listen to it again with more attention to the details.


    Any additional comments?

    I am deeply grateful to Michelle Alexander for putting forth such a great effort and producing a work of such quality and value.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Terre Davenport, IA, United States 03-11-13
    Terre Davenport, IA, United States 03-11-13 Member Since 2011
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    "necessary read"
    What did you love best about The New Jim Crow?

    I found more how prejudice permeates our world still.


    Any additional comments?

    I think everyone in America should read this necessary book. Michelle Alexander is well schooled in this topic and has done her research well. Only God can turn our hearts away from fear and hate but we can educate ourselves in how to recognize the fear in our hearts and the hearts of others.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
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